Skip to main content

Full text of "Illinois democracy : a history of the party and its representative members--past and present"

See other formats


' » 






MiSjjt 







iXfiBk 



< HI J '■ ■ 



ra 



I 
















m^ 



r 




V 
/ 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://www.archive.org/details/illinoisdemocrac03town 



JUmotH lemorranj 



A History of the Party and Its Representative 
Members — Past and Present 



WALTER A. TOWNSEND 
AUTHOR 

CHARLES BOESCHENSTEIN 
SUPERVISING EDITOR 



Volume III 




ILLUSTRATED 



COPYRIGHT 

DEMOCRATIC HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, Inc. 

Springfield, III. 

1935 



3^?- 3 

/ 3 





IIEXKY IIORXER 



Jlltats lemorranj 



HENRY HORNER 



Henry Horner, who is now serving his first term as governor of the state 
of Illinois, holds the distinction of being the third democratic governor of the 
state in the last forty years, his two predecessors having been Altgeld and 
Dunne. During the period in which he has held this high administrative office, 
he has demonstrated rare executive ability in affairs of state and in the conduct 
of those numerous and responsible duties which are assigned to him. 

Henry Horner was born in Chicago, Illinois, on the 30th of November, 1878, 
and is a son of Solomon A. and Dilah (Horner) Horner. His earliest education 
was obtained in the public schools of his native city, after which he studied 
at the Chicago Manual Training School and the South Side Academy. He 
entered the Chicago Kent College of Law and received his Bachelor of Arts 
degree therefrom in 1898. He was admitted to the bar in 1899. Governor 
Horner also holds the Doctor of Laws degree from both the Lincoln Memorial 
University of Tennessee and Knox College of Galesburg, Illinois. 

In 1899, Governor Horner established himself in practice in Chicago, in 
partnership with Frank A. Whitney, whose father, Henry C. Whitney, was a 
law partner of Abraham Lincoln. The reputation of the state's present gover- 
nor as a young lawyer quickly grew and his ability in litigation became widely 
recognized. He became vitally interested in civic affairs, and studied thor- 
oughly the problems which entered into the social and civic life of the city. 
Naturally he became a figure before the public, and in 1911 he was made a 
member of the Chicago Charter Convention. In 1914, he was nominated by t In- 
democratic party of Cook county for probate judge and was elected. For five 
terms thereafter, each of four years, he was reelected, each time with increasing 
majority, which is indicative of the character of his regime. Many innovations 
in court procedure were made by him during his tenure of office, many of his 
ideas now being put into effect in probate courts of other states. Among 
these may be mentioned the Horner Plan, which provides tor care of all war 
veterans' estates entirely without legal costs, expenses or attorney's fees to 
the beneficiaries. Labor troubles and other conflicts provided other fields in 
which he could manifest his ability as an arbitrator, and he was a leading 
factor in the work of many commissions which had to do with social and public 
welfare problems. Naturally, these activities of Judge Horner led to bigger 
opportunities. His worth became known all over the state and as early as 1931 
the movement to place him in the governor's chair started. By an overwhelming 
vote in the April primaries of 1932, he won the democratic nomination, and on 
November Sth following he was elected by a landslide vote. 

Governor Horner is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois 
State Bar Association, and the American Bar Association. He belongs to the 
Chicago Historical Society, the Chicago Art Institute, the Association of Com- 
merce, the Lincoln Centennial Association, the Masonic Order, and the Law. 
City, Chicago Literary, Mid-Day, Standard, Iroquois, Covenant, Collegiate, 
Illinois Athletic, Lake Shore Country, and Chicago Riding clubs. .Mention has 
been made in a preceding paragraph that Governor Horner's first law partner 



6 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

was the son of a former partner <>l Abraham Lincoln, who became an authority 
on Lincoln's life and career. Governor Horner became intensely interested 
in the life of the Greal Emancipator and during the intervening years has 
collected Lincolniana, his possessions now ranking among the best in the 
country. 

PATRICK A. NASH 

As chairman of the Cook County Democratic Central Committee and as a 
member of the National Democratic Committee, Patrick A. Nash, well-known 
construction contractor of Chicago, Illinois, holds an eminent position in the 
party in Illinois, and is known as one of the most able, sincere and energetic 
adherents of the party in this state. 

Patrick A. Nash is a native of Chicago, his birth having occurred there on 
the 2d of March, 1863. He is a son of Thomas and Mary (Hallinan) Nash, who 
came to Chicago in the year 1852. Thomas Nash was a pioneer in contracting 
work in this city, and was an honored citizen and member of the democratic 
party. Both he and his wife passed away in Chicago. 

In the Chicago public schools, Patrick A. Nash received his education and 
when a young man became associated in the contracting business with his 
father. Likewise, his brothers, Richard J. and John R., became affiliated with 
their father, all of them having received their training in the business from 
their worthy sire. The firm is now known as Nash Brothers, and is one of the 
leading concerns of its type in the state. A general contracting business is 
conducted, for tunnels, subways, foundations, conduit, sewer, and water systems, 
and many other kinds of construction work. Much municipal construction has 
been done by the firm. 

For many years, Patrick A. Nash has been a worker for the democratic 
party. His allegiance has never been questioned and he has utilized every 
honorable means within his power to enhance the success of democracy in his 
home city, county and state. In 1916, he took the office of county assessor, in 
which he served for sixteen months. He was then elected in 1918 to the Cook 
County Board of Review, and there he remained for six years. His present 
position as chairman of the Cook County Democratic Central Committee was 
assumed in 1932, and his membership on the national committee was taken to 
succeed the late Anton J. Cermak in 1933. 

Patrick A. Nash was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Kelley, who was 
born and reared in Chicago. To their union there have been born the following 
children: Mary M. ; Thomas, who is a graduate of Notre Dame University and 
now associated with the firm of Nash Brothers; John R., also a Notre Dame 
graduate and with the firm; and Helen, who died at the age of ten years. 

Mr. Nash is a member of the Western Society of Engineers, the Chicago 
Athletic Club, and the Crystal Lake Country Club. 



THOMAS J. COURTNEY 

By sheer force of his ability as a lawyer and as a state senator, Thomas J. 
Courtney, now state's attorney in Chicago, Illinois, has achieved high rank in 
democi'atic circles, and his record as a champion of the rights of Chicago and 
Cook county in legislative halls is one of which he may be justifiably proud. 
Aggressiveness and natural leadership have characterized his career, all with 
a background of real sincerity. 

Thomas J. Courtney is a native of Chicago, his birth having occurred on 
December 23, 1894. Securing an education was not an easy task during his 
youthful years. He worked his way through the Visitation grammar school and 
St. Rita's high school, then took up the study of law in the evening classes 
of the Chicago Kent College of Law. His legal career was interrupted in 1917 
by his enlistment in the military service of his country. After his return to 
civil life and his profession, recognition was quickly accorded to him. For 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 7 

a number of years, he was chief clerk and sergeant-at-arms of the city council 
of Chicago, and in these capacities he acquired a thorough and valuable know- 
ledge of civic affairs. Eventually he resigned from his position with the council, 
and for a period engaged in the private practice of law, with ever increasing 
reputation and prestige. 

In 1926, Mr, Courtney was elected to the state senate from the Eleventh 
(Englewood) district, and in this legislative body he quickly assumed a place 
of leadership. In fact, he became democratic leader of the senate, and was 
appointed to the important committee of Criminal Procedure and the Judiciary 
Advisory Council. In this Fifty-fifth session, he was also a member of the 
following committees: agriculture, livestock and dairying, canals, waterways, 
civil service, public utilities, license and miscellany, highway transportation, 
insurance, railroads, reapportionment, Congressional, and senatorial. It is 
interesting to note at this point, that he was elected to the senate in 1926 by 
the small majority of four thousand votes, but on the strength of his record 
in this succeeding session he was reelected in 1928 by the large majority of 
twenty-three thousand votes. 

It is a matter of accredited history that many of the advancements in 
criminal justice in Illinois which have been made during recent years have been 
made by those legislative bodies in which Senator Courtney served. He fought 
hard against any legislation which he considered detrimental to the public- 
welfare. Among the bills which he opposed vigorously were those providing 
for the first gasoline tax and the traction legislation of 1927. In his fight 
against these bills he was victorious. Particularly did Senator Courtney use 
his efforts for the benefit of Chicago and Cook county, and among his accom- 
plishments along this line was his struggle for reapportionment of the state to 
insure equal representation for Chicago and Cook county. 

In 1928, Senator Courtney was the democratic candidate for the office of 
attorney general of Illinois, and now, in his responsible position as state's 
attorney in Cook county, he has manifested extraordinary understanding of 
criminal procedure and is conducting his duties along the same capable and 
thorough channels as he used in his legislative incumbency. He now serves as 
judge advocate of the James ('. Russell-Blackhawk Post of the American Legion, 
and holds an abiding interest in the welfare of the veterans and of legislation 
to benefit them. 

Thomas J. Courtney is married and lias a daughter, Rita. The family 
residence is situated at 9958 Green street. 



BRUCE ALEXANDER CAMPBELL 

Bruce Alexander Campbell, of East St. Louis, Illinois, and who became 
chairman of the Illinois Democratic Central Committee in 1!K>4. has been 
actively and prominently identified with democratic politics for many years. 
and today is one of the most influential and capable men in the ranks of the 
party in this state. 

Bruce A. Campbell was born in Albion. Edwards county, Illinois. October 
28, 1879, and is a son of .Indue Joseph N. and Amabel i Thompson) Campbell. 
Mr. Campbell's great-grandfather came to Wayne county before Illinois had 
been created as a state and when Wayne county was a part of Edwards COUntj . 
He was one of the real pioneers of the southern pari of the state, and was a 
democrat of high standing. He was a member of the Second General Assembly 
in 1820, in which body he introduced and had passed the act creating Wayne 
county. The county seat was stated in the act to be at his home, until the 
regular location had been determined. He was reelected to the assembly in 
bs22. and was also sheriff of Wayne county at one time. .Mr. ( Jampbell 's grand- 
father, Alexander Campbell, was likewise sheriff of Wayne county and a mem 
ber of the legislature in the '.~>0s. 

Judge Joseph X. Campbell, father of Bruce A., was very active i'i demo 



8 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

eratic politics. Although he lived in a strongly republican county, be was 
county judge of Edwards county from 1873 to L886, master in chancery for 
Edwards county for a quarter century, and president of the board of education 
for over twenty years. During the Civil war. be was a second lieutenant in 
Company (J, Eighteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and after the war closed 
he stalled practicing law in Albion and so continued until 1918. 

Bruce A. ( ampbell's maternal ancestors were also pioneers of southern 
Illinois. His maternal grandmother was born in Albion in 1821, daughter oi 
Henry Bowman and wife, who were original settlers in the English colony 
in Albion in 1818. Ilis maternal grandfather, Dr. Frank B. Thompson, came 
from England to Albion in 1929 and. with the exception of the time he spent 
in the Black Hawk. Mexican and Civil wars, practiced his profession there 
for nearly a half century. 

Bruce A. Campbell went through the grade and high schools of Albion, hav- 
ing graduated from the latter in 1894. He then attended the Southern Col- 
legiate Institute in Albion, and graduated in 18!<7. His higher studies were 
then taken up at the University of Illinois, and he received therefrom his 
Bachelor of Arts degree in 1900. It may he noted here, that in the university 
.Mr. Campbell first took an active pail in politics, and was lor two and a half 
years president of the Students Democratic Club. Beginning in 1894, Mr. 
Campbell studied law with his father, continued during his school vacations 
and until his admission to the bar in December, 1901. lie practiced his pro- 
fession in Albion until 1905, then moved to East St. Louis, where he associated 
with E. ( '. and 11. .1. Kramer. On June 1, 1906, the firm of Kramer, Kramer & 
Campbell was organized, and existed for over twenty-five years, or until the 
death of E. C. Kramer in 1931. 

One of Mi-. Campbell's early offices was that of village attorney of Albion 
in 1903-04. Governor Deneen appointed him as a member of the committee to 
recommend changes in law practice and procedure in the state. In 1902, he 
ran unsuccessfully on the democratic ticket for the General Assembly, but in 
1904 be was nominated and elected representative from the Forty-eighth dis- 
trict, which was made up of Crawford, Lawrence, Wabash, Edwards, White. 
Gallatin, and Hardin counties. Then, after moving to East St. Louis, he ran 
unsuccessfully for Congress in 1910. .Mr. Campbell's next bid for public office 
was in 1932, when he was a candidate for the governorship in the democratic 
primary and made an extraordinarily fine showing. Mr. Campbell has been 
a delegate to practically e\t>iy state convention since 1900, was < list rid dele- 
gate from the Twenty-second District to the Baltimore convention in 1912, 
delegate-at-large from Illinois to the New York convention of 1924, at the 
Houston convention in 1928 and at the Chicago convention of 1932. He was 
temporary and permanent chairman of the democrat LC slate conventions in 1922, 
1926 and 1!»:!2. also temporary chairman in 1930. In the campaign of 192S, he 
was vice chairman of the Central Region of the Democratic National Com- 
mittee, which covered eight slates, in 1913. he was offered the place as attor- 
ney-general of the United Slates, but declined, also in l'.)'^ he declined a position 
on the War Frauds Commission. In 1934, finally, he was made chairman of 
the Illinois Democratic Central Committee. 

In 1!M).">. Mr. Campbell was married to Miss Beulah Wilson Campbell, 
whose father. Dr. .1. M. Campbell, was a pioneer physician of St. ('lair county. 
Illinois. Mr. and .Mrs. ( lampbell have a son. Joseph Bruce ( 'ampbell, of ( IhicagO. 
Mis. Campbell is also devoted to the interests of the democratic party. In 1!>24 
and in 1926, she was the nominee of the democratic party for trustee of 1 he 
University of Illinois. 

Mr. ('ampbell is a xrry prominent member of the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and has held many important positions in the lodge. He was 
exalted ruler of the lodge in Easl St. Louis in 1909-10, and president of the 
Illinois Elks Association in 1 f M 1 - 1 12 . He belonged to the National Elks War Be- 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 9 

lief Association from 1918 until the termination of its service, and since the year 
1921 he has belonged to the Elks National Memorial Headquarters Commission, 
and its successor, the Elks Memorial and Publication Commission. This latter 
organization built the National Memorial Building in Chicago and conducts the 
Elks Magazine. Mr. Campbell is vice chairman of this commission. He is like- 
wise chairman of the Illinois Elks Association Crippled Children's Clinic, 
which has over sixty clinics in the state and a hospital in Chicago. Mr. Campbell 
has taken the Scottish Rite degrees to the thirty-second in Masonry and also 
belongs to the Knights Templar. He holds membership with the Modern Wood- 
men of America. He is a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon collegiate fra- 
ternity and the Phi Beta Kappa honorary scholarship fraternity. Although 
Mr. Campbell maintains his office and business connections in East St. Louis, he 
has his permanent home, which he built in 1926, at 21 Oak Knoll, Belleville, 
Illinois. 



JOHN STELLE 



The career of John Stelle, of McLeansboro, as a business man, a farmer. 
a lawyer and as a public office holder has been constructed on a basis of real 
achievement, and he is rated as one of the formost democrats of the state. As 
assistant state auditor and in 1934 the successful democratic candidate for 
the responsible position as state treasurer, he has gained a position of eminence 
in his party, all enhanced by his meritorious service in the United States Army 
during the World war. 

John Stelle was born August 10, 1891 in McLeansboro, Hamilton county. 
Illinois, and is a son of Thompson B. Stelle, an outstanding lawyer of the 
state. His ancestry dates back one hundred and seven years in Hamilton 
county, and he is of English, Irish, French, and German lineage. 

The public schools of McLeansboro supplied Mr. Stelle with his first edu- 
cation and then, inspired by the success of his respected father in the legal 
profession, he took up the study of law in the Washington University Law 
School in St. Louis, which conferred upon him his law degree in 1916, in which 
same year he was admitted to the bar. 

Mr. Stelle 's legal career was interrupted in April, 1917, when he enlisted 
in the United States Army, war having been declared against the German 
Empire. He became a first lieutenant in Company B, One Hundred and Fif- 
teenth Machine Gun Battalion, Thirtieth Division, in France and served seven- 
teen months overseas with this notable combat unit. He was wounded and 
gassed during the conflict. 

After receiving his honorable discharge, Mr. Stelle returned to McLeans- 
boro, where he resumed his farming and law practice. He also became connected 
with a dairy products plant, which is one of the foremost industries at present 
in Illinois. From the time lie reached his majority, Mr. Stelle has been an 
earnest and stanch adherent of the democratic party, and has always been 
a diligent worker in its behalf. For sixteen years, he was active in Hamilton 
county and reached a high rank among the democratic forces of that section of 
the state. In 1928, he assisted in the organization of the Downstate Democratic 
Organization, and in 19)50 he helped with the management of the downstate 
campaign for James Hamilton Lewis, who was running for the United States 
Senate. He also aided in the campaign at this time of Mr. Barrett, candidate 
for state treasurer, and William II. Dieterich, candidate for congressman-at- 
large. Two years later, he was director of organization for the Democratic 
State Central Committee, and in this capacity cooperated with Bruce Camp- 
bell and other party leaders in managing the downstate campaign for President 
Roosevelt and the democratic state officials. Then, in 1931, Mr. Stelle was 
appointed assistant state treasurer by Edward J. Barrett, then newly elected. 
He held this position until Mi-. Barretl was elected auditor of public accounts, 
and he then became assistant state auditor. In 1934, Mr. Stelle was named as the 



10 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

democratic nominee for the office of stale treasurer, ami was duly elected by 
the people on November 6, 1!<34. His record in public office and his sincerity 
and honesty in the conduct of his affairs make him a very popular candidate 
mi the democratic state ticket. 

All-. Stelle was united in marriage in 1912 to Miss Wilma Wiseheart, of 
Shawneetown, Illinois, and they have become the parents of two sons. 



THOMAS FANNING DONOVAN 

Thomas Fanning Donovan, who now holds the high position as lieutenant- 
governor of the state of Illinois, has had a distinguished career in the practice 
of law and has been one of the most eminent members of the democratic party 
for many years, also lias held important posts in the service of the party. 

Thomas F. Donovan was born on a farm in Livingston county, Illinois, 
December 17, 1871, of Irish descent, and is a son of Patrick and Kachael 
' Purcell) Donovan. The father was a native of County Cork, Ireland, and came 
To the United States with his father, James Donovan, in 1854. From 1857 until 
1866, they resided on a farm in Knox county. Illinois, then moved to Livingston 
county. Rachael Purcell Donovan was horn in County Tipperary, Ireland, and 
came to American shores in 1854. She was married in New York state, and a 
tew years later came to Illinois. By her marriage, she was the mother of eight 
children, of whom Thomas F. is the seventh in order of birth. 

On the home farm near Chatsworth in Livingston county, Thomas F. Don- 
ovan was reared. He was a student in the Chatsworth high school, and in 1889 
entered Valparaiso University in Indiana. He studied in that institution for 
five years, and received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1893, and his Bachelor 
of Laws in 1894. His collegiate work was interrupted for several intervals 
when he engaged in teaching. He was principal of the schools in Danforth, 
Illinois, from 18!)1 to 1893, and he also studied law under the preceptorship 
of Free P. Morris in Watseka. Mr. Donovan was admitted to the Illinois bar 
in the year 181)4 and for the following eleven years engaged in practice in 
Kankakee, lie was city attorney there from 1897 until 1901. Politics at this 
time claimed much of his attention, and he was a member of the Democratic 
State Central Committee from 1896 until 1904. 

In 190.">, Mr. Donovan took up his law practice in Joliet, Illinois. He is 
now senior member of the firm of Donovan, Bray & Gray of Joliet and Chicago, 
which is one of the foremost legal organizations in northern Illinois. Real 
i state and railroad laws have been the special field of Mr. Donovan's practice, 
and he is universally recognized as an authority on them, lie is the author 
nf ;i widely used reference hook on real estate and railroad law. He has gained 
a splendid reputation likewise as a speaker, and has lectured much, principally 
on historical subjects. 

Mr. Donovan's hist public office was that of city attorney of Kankakee, 
which he received in 18!)7, as previously noted. In 1923, he was chairman of 
the Joliet Fire & Police Commission, and in 1924 he was the democratic 
candidate for the office of attorney-general of Illinois, hut was defeated. From 
1912 until his election to his present position, he was a member of the Demo- 
cratic State Central Committee, and he was chairman of this committee from 
I!»22 until 1934. In 1928, he was elected a member of the Democratic National 
Committee, and on April 12, 1932 he was nominated for the high office of 
lieutenant-governor on the democratic ticket, and was duly elected. The com- 
pleteness and efficiency of his regime is typical of his whole career and he has 
brilliantly discharged the duties which he has assumed. 

On -Inly •"), 1894, Mw Donovan was married to Miss Alice Aaron; her death 
occurred November 8, 1901. To this union there were born two daughters. 
Grace and Gertrude, both of whom studied in the Illinois Normal University 
and were teachers. Grace is now married to George T. Scully of Chicago, and 




THOMAS F. DONOVAN 



ILLINOIS DEMOCEACY 13 

they have five children. Gertrude is the wife of Carl Kinstler of Kalamazoo, 
Michigan, and they have three children. 

Mr. Donovan was married secondly on June 25, 1905, to Miss Gertrude 
M. Nugent. They have become the parents of two sons, Thomas J. and James. 

The religious faith of Thomas F. Donovan is that of the Roman Catholic 
Church. He belongs to the Will County, the Illinois State and the American 
bar associations, and is a member of the Knights of Columbus and the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. 



HON. JOHN TOMAN 



Hon. John Toman has left the impress of his individuality and ability 
indelibly upon the history of Chicago. For two decades he served as a member 
of the city council and is now sheriff of Cook county, also has held other 
official positions in which he has demonstrated his unfaltering loyalty to munici- 
pal welfare and all that pertains to public progress, improvement and upbuild- 
ing. A native of Czechoslovakia, then Bohemia, where he was born May 12, 
1876, Mr. Toman has lived continuously in Chicago since 1883, having been a 
little lad of but seven years when brought to this city. His educational oppor- 
tunities were extremely limited, as he left school in the third grade and began 
to earn his living, selling papers on the streets of Chicago from 1886 until 1889. 
Each step in his career has been a forward one, however, and actuated by a 
laudable ambition, he has pushed steadily forward. For a time he worked as 
a cash boy with Dennis F. Kelly in the Mandel Brothers store, receiving a wage 
of two dollars per week. In 1889 he obtained a position as an office boy in the 
Chicago public library and remained in the library until 1912, winning various 
promotions, each one with added responsibilities. He attributes his real edu- 
cation to the contacts that he made when in the library and to the opportunities 
which he utilized of learning from both books and people. His life is indeed 
an exemplification of the trite but forceful expression "a self-made man," 
and as he has advanced he has made his work of greater and greater usefulness 
to his fellowmen. 

Interested from early life in politics, Mr. Toman was elected alderman on 
the democratic ticket from the old thirty-fourth ward in April, 1912, and con- 
tinuously served as a member of the council until 1923, when Mayor Dever 
appointed him a member of the board of local improvements, which position 
he occupied for two years. In the meantime the redisricting' of the city had 
changed the thirty-fourth to the twenty-third ward, and following the death 
of Joseph 0. Kostner on February 25, 1925, Mr. Toman succeeded him as alder- 
man of the twenty-third ward, a special election being held to fill the vacancy 
in May of that year. From the beginning of his connection with the city council 
his service has been of value in municipal affairs. During his first term he had 
tlie unusual distinction of being appointed chairman of the water committee, 
for it is unusual for an alderman in his first term to be made the head of any of 
the important committees. His influence has long been a potent factor in pro- 
moting the best interests of the municipality and he has served on all of the 
important committees of the council, including those on License, streets and 
alleys, track elevation, local industries and the Chicago com mission on the 
liquor problem. He has ever studied carefully and thoroughly every question 
having to do with the general good, and further recognition of his important 
service to the party is indicated in the fact that at the primary of lf»:!4 lie was 
nominated for the office of sheriff of Cook county, and elected in the following 
November by an overwhelming vote. He was an alternate delegate at large, 
with George E. Brennan, William E. Dever and James Hamilton Lewis to the 
democratic national convention at Houston. Texas, in 1928, resulting in the 
nomination of Alfred E Smith of New York for president, and Senator Joseph 
T. Robinson of Arkansas for vice president. He represented the sixth con- 
gressional district of Illinois at the democratic national convention held in 



14 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Chicago in 1932, which resulted in the nomination and election of Franklin 
Delano Roosevelt for president and John N. Garner of Texas for viee president. 
Mr. Toman was elected a delegate to the Illinois repeal convention meeting in 
the city of Springfield on July 10, 1933, at the state capitol, for the purpose 
of repealing the eighteenth amendment to the constitution of the United States, 
popularly known as the "prohibition amendment." 

Mr. and Mrs. Toman, the latter having been Miss Bertha Sefcik before her 
marriage, have a family of two daughters and a son: Irene, who is now the wife 
of Dr. Elmer Witous and has a son, E. J. Witous; Dr. Andrew J. Toman, resi- 
dent physician at the Cook County Hospital; and Lucile, who is completing 
her education in the Carter H. Harrison high school. 

Mr. Toman is prominently known in Masonic circles and is a past archon 
and member of the state advisory board of Lafayette Chapter, R. A. M. He 
is also identified with Columbia Commandery, K. T., with the Shrine, the Grotto, 
the Camels, and with the Medinah Athletic (Tub. He belongs as well to Chicago 
Lodge Xo. 4, B. P. 0. E., and the Knights of Pythias, and he still retains con- 
nection with the land of his birth through his membership in the Bohemian 
(lull. His social qualities have made many friendships and his political contacts 
have gained for him the respect and admiration of his fellow workers, who 
attest the unsullied character of his Americanism and give him [dace among 
Chicago's leading citizens. 

WARREN H. ORR 

Mr. Justice Warren H. Orr, of Carthage, Illinois, attained extraordinary 

recognition in the legal profession when just a young man and during the 
subsequent years progressed steadily until he reached the Supreme Court of 
the state, an achievement worthy of the ability and talent lie possesses in 
tin- law. Mr. Justice Orr was born in Hannibal, Missouri, on November 5. 
1896, and after graduating from high school there he entered the University 
of Missouri, and from that institution received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 
1909 and his Bachelor of Laws in 1911. He earned his way through the uni- 
versity chiefly by doing newspaper work. He became editor of his college paper, 
and he was one of seven students chosen for a senior honorary society. 

After his graduation, Mr. Justice Orr was admitted to both the Missouri 
ami the Illinois bars. He first established himself in practice at Quincy, 
Illinois, and later, in 1911, moved to Hamilton, Illinois. He was elected city 
attorney of Hamilton in 1913 and held the office for five years with a most 
creditable record. In 1918, he was elected county judge of Hancock county, 
re-elected in 1922, and again in 1926, the last time without opposition. As a 
judge, he manifested exceptional qualities, and often, while county judge, he 
was asked to preside in the county and probate courts of Cook county and in 
the municipal courts of Chicago. In 1923, he was elected president of the 
Illinois County and Probate Judges' Association, and on June 2. 1930 lie was 
elected to the Supreme Court of the State, and is still a member. In this digni- 
fied position he has rendered distinguished service, and has served as chief 
justice of this court. 

In 1914, Mr. Justice Orr was united in marriage to Dorothy Wallace oi 
Hamilton, and to them have been born three sons, whose names are Wallace 
Warren and William. 



JOSEPH L. GILL 

Joseph L. Gill, clerk of the municipal court of Cook county, has been a 
lifelong resident of Chicago. His parents were Richard and Bridget (Sweeney 
Gill, the former a native of Ireland who on coming to the new world settled on 
the north side of Chicago. The public schools accorded Joseph L. Gill his early 
educational opportunities, and he afterward attended the Metropolitan Busi- 
ness College. Much of his life has been devoted to public service, and endorse- 
ment of his official activities has come to him in the large majorities given him 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 15 

when he has been a candidate for positions of public trust, He served as chief 
clerk in the county treasurer's office from 1914 until 1918, and from 1919 until 
1926 was comptroller for the Forest preserves of Cook comity. In 1926 he was 
made valuator for the Forest preserves and continued to act in that capacity 
until 1930. It was also in 1926 that he was elected a member of the Illinois 
house of representatives from the thirty-first district and after serving during 
the fifty -fifth assembly he was reelected for a second term of two years, con- 
tinuing in the legislature until 1930. In November of that year he was elected 
clerk of the municipal court of Cook county, which office he now holds. Since 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise he has been unfaltering in his 
allegiance to the democratic party and for ten years he served as the secretary 
of the Cook county central committee. He was also a committeeman of the 
forty-sixth ward and in 19)52 he was a delegate to the democratic national con- 
vention in Chicago from the ninth district. 

On the 23d of December, 1924, Mr. Gill was married to Bertha Fogarty, 
of Springfield. The family attended St. Sebastian Catholic Church for forty 
years and are now communicants of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church. Mr. 
Gill belongs to the Knights of Columbus and also has membership with the 
Ancient Order of Hibernians, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
the Lake Shore Athletic Club, the Chicago Athletic Club, the Butterfield 
Country Club and with the Iroquois Club, which draws its membership from 
supporters of the democratic party. 

KICHEY VIVIAN GRAHAM 

Richey Vivian Graham, member of the Illinois senate, of which he was 
president pro tern in 1933 and 1934, and a well known business man of Chicago, 
was born in Gait, Ontario, Canada, November 22, 1886, a son of John Alexander 
and Lyda Campbell (Richey) Graham. The removal of the family to Chicago 
enabled him to pursue his early education in the public schools of this city, 
while later he attended the Danville Military Institute at Danville, Virginia. 
In preparation for a professional career he entered the Chicago-Kent College 
of Law, which institution conferred upon him the Bachelor of Laws and the 
Master of Laws degrees. He has continuously engaged in active practice since 
February 13, 1930, and occupies a creditable position at the bar but has not 
confined his efforts entirely to this held, for he is the president of Cerniak & 
Serhant, Inc., having assumed the duties of the position on the 15th of April, 
1934. He is also vice president of the Homan Building & Loan Association, of 
which he has been a director for the past fifteen years. His spirit of enterprise 
enables him to carry forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes 
and thus he has steadily advanced in his professional and business career. 

Mr. Graham was a graduate of the First Officers Training Camp at Fort 
Sheridan and was commissioned second lieutenant of infantry. He was assigned 
to the Three Hundred and Forty-fourth Infantry at Camp Grant, Illinois, was 
promoted to first lieutenant of infantry and was assigned to the Eighty-sixth 
Division, known as the Blackhawk Division, with which he was overseas for 
seven months. In fact he was a member of the United States Army from May 
15, 1917, until October 1. 1919, when he received an honorable discharge. 

About the time of his enlistment Mr. Graham was married in Chicago, 
June 23, 1917, to Miss Lillian Cerniak, daughter of the late Anton J. Cerniak. 
who was Chicago's mayor and the recognized leader of Illinois Democracy. 
Their children are Vivian Cerniak, Anton J. ('.. Richey V., Jr., and Roberl John 
Graham. 

Mr. Graham's religious faith is that of the Presbyterian Church, lie belongs 
to the Chicago liar Association, the Illinois Bar Association, the American 
Bar Association ami the Phi Alpha Delta, a law fraternity. He is a thirty 
second degree Mason and a charter member of Cicero Lodge, No. 1510, B. P. < ». 
E. His social nature finds expression in his membership in the .Medinah Countrj 
Club, the Medinah Athletic Club, the Illinois Athletic Club and the Chain of 



16 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Lakes Country Club of Antioch, Illinois. Be is ;i past commander of Lawndale- 
Crawtord t'OSl No. 98 <>l the American Legion, ;i trustee of the Forty and 
Eight Convalescent Camp for Disabled War Veterans at Palos Park. Illinois, 
and a member of the Iroquois Club of Chicago. The last named indicates his 
political preference. He has always voted the democratic ticket, is a member 
and vice chairman of the county central committee of Cook county and is 
district leader of the town of Cicero. For four years, from May 2, 102:5, to 
.May 2, 1!H'T, he was superintendent of the Chicago House of Correction and was 
assistant to the president of the board of county commissioners from May 3, 
1!>27. to January 8, 1929. [n the latter year he took his place as a member of 
the house of representatives, serving for the two-year term, and in 19:51 he 
became senator from the nineteenth district, serving until December 31, l!t:54, 
and acting as president pro tern in the upper house in 19:5:5 and 1!):54. He has 
proved a fair and unprejudiced presiding officer and wielded a wide influence 
in support of progressive public measures put forth by the democratic leaders 
of the commonwealth. 



ANTON JOSEPH CERMAK 

For a number of years an outstanding figure in connection with the his- 
tory of the democratic party not only of Chicago but of the entire state, and 
to a considerable degree of the nation, Anton Joseph Cermak rose from ob- 
scurity to prominence and wielded a wide and beneficial influence over the 
destinies of the metropolis with which he was connected. Bohemia was his 
native land, his birth having occurred at Kladno, a small town about fifty miles 
from Prague, on the 9th of May, 1873, but he was only a year old when brought 
to the new world from Czechoslovakia, as his country is now known. The 
attractive stories which his father heard concerning the United States and its 
opportunities led him to desire to give his family the chances here afforded, 
and crossing the Atlantic, he came at once to Illinois, settling near Braidwood, 
where he worked in the mines. It was there that Anton Cermak was reared, 
and when only eight years of age he began working in the mines, gaining 
experiences that shaped his entire after life. He knew what poverty was, both 
because of the financial condition of his own family and that of the people 
about him, and he never ceased to feel the keenest interest in those who were 
struggling to gain a financial foothold. His opportunities to attend school 
were naturally limited, but all through Ins life he possessed keen powers of 
observation and discrimination that gave him a knowledge not gained from 
books. Moreover, a spirit of ambition developed that caused him to leave 
Braidwood and seek his fortune in the larger city. With his worldly goods 
tied up in the proverbial red bandanna, he left his home town at the age of 
seventeen years and came alone to Chicago. He had no money and it was 
necessary that he find immediate employment, which he did by hiring as tow- 
boy for horse-drawn Street cars, riding the extra horse that helped to pull a 
car up the grade on the Line Island avenue viaduct. Not far from where he 
worked was the plant of the International Harvester Company, and as he went 
to and fro he saw huge bonfires in the yards, made by burning the waste wood 
from the planing mills. This attracted his attention. He had been taught the 
strictest economy and he could not endure to sec the waste of this material when 
his neighbors so needed firewood. At Length he bought a rickety old wagon 
and an old nag and arranged with the McCormick works and the Tegtmeier 
Lumber Company to haul away their waste wood, which they were glad to 
gel rid of. This he sold at fifty cents a load to the pool- people of the district, 
and it was in this way that Anton Cermak really made his initial step toward 
fortune. Again his powers of observation enabled him to recognize the fact 
that men were gaining wealth through investment in real estate, and as his 
business »Tcw from wood hauling and teaming contracting, he invested his 
surplus earnings in property which in time assumed major proportions and 




ANTON J. CERMAK 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 19 

came to occupy most of his attention. He then turned his teaming activities 
over to his lather and a brother and concentrated his efforts upon real estate 
and private banking. He became one of the organizers of the Lawndale Build- 
ing and Loan Association and helped many a family to home ownership in 
that section of the city. 

On attaining his majority Mr. Cermak was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Horejs, who was then eighteen years of age and who passed away in 1928. 
They were parents of three daughters: Mrs. Riehey V. Graham, whose husband 
is a member of the state senate and is mentioned elsewhere in this work; Mrs. 
Frank J. Jirka, whose husband is head of the state health department through 
appointment of Governor Horner; and Mrs. Floyd Kenley. There are also 
six grandchildren, and Mr. Cermak 's devotion to his granddaughter. Vivian 
Graham, constituted one of the outstanding characteristics of his life. His love 
and affection seemed to center in this granddaughter and he found his greatest 
happiness in her society. 

Upon becoming a resident of Chicago, Mr. Cermak took a keen interest in 
the sokols, societies that are to the Bohemian race what the turnvereins are 
to those of German nationality. This greatly broadened his acquaintance, 
and wherever he went the sterling worth of the young man was recognized and 
he was called to leadership. It was but natural that he should enter the 
political field, for he always was a man of strong convictions and was tear- 
less in their support. In the early days he stood strongly in opposition to pro- 
hibition and became identified with the United Societies, in the work of which 
he took an active part for personal liberty. He was made secretary of the 
United Societies for Local Self Government and he advocated that the organi- 
zation become a political factor. At length it became a recognized fact that 
in certain sections of the city no candidate could be elected if he did nut have 
the endorsement of the United Societies. As the years passed Mr. Cermak 
grew in power and influence and for four successive terms was elected to the 
state legislature, in which he opposed the Anti-Saloon League and local option 
at a time when older and more cautious politicians thought his course a most 
unwise one, but Mr. Cermak always fought in the open and did not hesitate to 
support his convictions. Chicago recognized his ability and his merit by elect- 
ing him to the city council. In an article in The Chicago Daily News, written 
after his death on March 6, 1933, it was said: 

'When national prohibition became effective the city's revenue of one 
thousand dollars a year each from hundreds of dramshops stopped immediately. 
He introduced an ordinance for widening the scope of the license bureau which 
brought one hundred thousand dollars into the city treasury within two months. 
nearly three million dollars in the following year and more than double that 
amount in recent years. 

""As chairman of the city council committee on railway terminals he 
helped clarify the lake front ordinances for electrification of the Illinois Cen- 
tral suburban train service and opening up of Chicago's front yard on the 
lake — Grant park, where the 1933 Century of Progress is to open on June 1. 

"The Chicago athletic commission, supervising professional sports, grew 
out of a Cermak ordinance and became a model for the state law. 

'When he became head of the county government, he faced what seemed 
an unbeatable combination. He fell heir to a deficit of two million, twenty 
thousand dollars, and he, a democrat, had to manage a board that was republican 
in majority. In three months he controlled a voting majority and had started 
the commissioners upon a program of retrenchment in expenditures and revenue 
solidification. Eventually the deficit was cleared away and the county was 
placed upon what he termed a cash basis as far as operations were concerned. 
At the same time the charitable and institutional facilities ol th • county were 
enlarged and improved. 

"In spite of the fact that county appropriations lor charitable purposes 



20 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

and public service were increased from lour million, five hundred and ninety- 
six thousand, eight hundred and five dollars in 1!I22 to seven million, seven 
hundred and seventy-six thousand, six hundred and eighty-four dollars in 1930, 
more than a fifty per cent jump, the county tax rate remained virtually at the 
1922 level. 

'The Cook County hospital, the Juvenile court and detention home, the 
Oak Forest infirmary, the children's hospital, and the new jail and Criminal 
Courts building- were regarded by Cermak as models for the world to shoot at 
in public service, structure and organization. 

•Through all of his work in political office, Cermak had continually been 
accused of being a spoilsman. Although he had used public office as a means 
of providing jobs for worthy members of his party, charges of personal graft 
had never been proved against him. 

"When he succeeded to the presidency of the county board, methods of 
taking care of the public business were in a mess. Vital property and human 
records were a Chinese puzzle. Taxes were extended and bills addressed by 
hand, and the county's finances were straitened. 

"Appearing before the judges of the Circuit court and revealing the finan- 
cial condition of the county, he demanded a curtailment. The judges, who 
designate the number of employes in fee offices, told Cermak coldly to support 
his contentions with evidence. In thirty days he presented preliminary results 
of a survey of every fee office under the county government. 

"Then began a real fight. He wanted modern mechanical recording and 
addressing systems, but he faced stubborn resistance from members of the 
board of review and the assessors. Labor-saving devices eliminated jobs, and 
jobs eliminated meant weakening of political organizations. Cermak, a politi- 
cian of the old school himself, was just as obstinate as were the assessors and 
reviewers. 

"He vetoed appropriation bills and successfully rode three cases through 
to the state supreme court. One of them would have had the county finance 
prohibition officers in enforcement work on the highways. Cermak maintained 
that through his riding herd on the board a minimum of one million, five hundred 
thousand dollars annually was saved. 

"Four years ago he had a survey made of the whole county government 
by nonpolitical experts. It produced some startling deductions. The report, 
known as the Jacobs report, said that between thirty-five million dollars ami 
seventy million dollars annually could be saved to the people of Chicago and 
Cook county through consolidation of the four hundred and more separate 
tax-spreading bodies within the county, elimination of overlapping effort, 
and so on. 

"Cermak approved that action for the county and had made some effort 
at consolidation of city departments, although not with marked success. 

"When Anton J. Cermak was inaugurated as mayor on April 28, 1931, the 
nation had been in the throes of a depression for eighteen months and the city's 
finances were in a hazardous, not to say dangerous, state. Three years earlier 
a reassessment of Cook county real .-state had been ordered by the state tax 
commission. 

"High assessments had resulted with greatly increased tax bills, with the 
result that a taxpayers' strike was under way. That was a hazardous con 
dition, even with the billing of taxes two years behind time. 

"It was a thankless task, being mayor of Chicago, and vrry little glory in 
prospect. Previous administrations had overburdened the city with bond 
issues for public improvements, governmental costs were high. If Cermak had 
wanted to be a spoilsman, the opportunity did not exist. He could not raid 
the city treasury, had he been so minded: he could not put faithful democrats 
at work in city jobs, because the jobs did not exist; there was no money to pay 
salaries. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 21 

■"There have been charges by political opponents that he flouted civil ser- 
vice by discharging employees under that classification and replacing them with 
temporary appointees. Perhaps that was done to some extent, as previous 
administrations have done, but still Cermak was faced with one terrific job — 
) educing expenses. He made a start on that task. The work is unfinished, for it 
was something that could not be accomplished over night. 

"Cermak pledged himself to reduce municipal costs, but he had a holdover 
school board to contend with. He promptly declared war on that board, but 
was unable to gain control himself until a year later. In his first budget mes- 
sage he provided for city cost reduction of fifteen million dollars. 

"Relief of unemployed in the city was imperative. The mayor sought help 
in a special session of the state legislature, without avail. As a democratic 
administration went into power in Springfield with the beginning of the pre- 
sent year he renewed much more vigorously his demand for emergency legis- 
lation and at the time of his death realization of that aim was well under way. 

"Another inherited evil was the power of hoodlum gangs in Chicago. The 
mayor declared war upon the outlaws through his police department, which he 
turned inside out. The war against the hoodlums had not been won by any 
means when he relinquished control of city affairs, but their fangs had been 
pulled." 

Tired out with the complex task of straightening out Chicago's affairs, 
the mayor sought rest in Florida, intending also to there have an interview 
with Franklin 1). Roosevelt, then president-elect, between whom and Cermak 
there had sprung up a strong friendship. A bullet aimed at the incoming 
president by a fanatic struck Mr. Cermak. The story of his last illness is too 
well known to need repetition here. He had served as host to both national 
party conventions in 19:}2 and had been an ardent supporter of Roosevelt in the 
election campaign. The president-elect took him in his own car to a hospital, 
and when the end finally came he said: "It is needless to say that the news of 
the death of Mayor Cermak affects me very deeply and very personally. Aside 
from the tragic chain of events of which his death is the result, a very warm 
friendship and a very high respect for Mayor Cermak's ability, friendship and 
loyalty to his friends would have made his loss a heavy one to me under any 
circumstances. The brave fight he made shows clearly the wonderful courage 
of the man. The country at large and the great city of Chicago in particular 
will miss a strong and resolute character." 

Funeral services for Mayor Cermak were held in the Chicago Stadium, on 
which occasion eminent men from all sections of the country were present, 
while thousands and thousands of the common people were there to pay their 
tribute of respect. In a biography which Paul R. Leach wrote for The Chicago 
Daily News, he said: "Anton Joseph Cermak. mayor of Chicago in her most 
troublous time, is dead, his work of restoring the good name of the city un- 
finished. With his passing today at .Miami. Florida, victim of a bullet fired by 
a crazed anarchist at president-elect Roosevelt on the night of February 15. 
was terminated one of the most colorful political epics in American history. He 
had served almost two years of his term. His progress from immigrant mine boy 
in the coal fields of Braidwood, Illinois, to the chair of government in the second 
largest city of his adopted land, was not a meteoric rise. Rather it was a steady, 
uphill climb. It was a fight against poverty, against the odds of poor educational 
opportunities, through the old roughneck battle grounds of polities in ( 'hieago's 
southwest side. His business and political success came through long hours of 
plodding, hard work." 

In an editorial The ( 'hicago Daily News wrote :" In an hour of grave crisis, 
when the discharge of executive duties demanded physical courage and moral 
stamina. Anton J. Cermak proved himself and won the respect and loyally of 
the people of Chicago. His life was snuffed out by a bullet intended for another, 
but throughout his term of service as mayor of this city he walked daily, cour- 



22 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

ageously and fearlessly, under the menace of a bullet intended for himself. 
But the ever-present shadow of possible assassination never swerved him from 
his ceaseless warfare upon the forces of the underworld which he bad challenged 
and roundly beaten in every encounter. I erinak was not only mayor of Chi- 
cago; he was the unchallenged leader of his party in Illinois, and as such was 
subjected to constant pressure to employ both patronage and public money tor 
partisan purposes. Against that insistent demand he stood throughout like 
a stone wall. Threats of political reprisal at the bands of discharged office- 
holders and disappointed office seekers seemed only to arouse to greater degree 
his fighting spirit. Before be was laid low by an assassin be had reorganized the 
government of Chicago, bad reduced its operating expenses by nearly one-third, 
and was bard at work on plans that promised eventual financial recuperation 
and rehabilitation for the city." 

Such was Cermak, the mayor. Cermak, the man, was a most kindly spirit 
who never torgot his own difficulties and hardships of early life and therefore 
never ceased lo sympathize with the poor and downtrodden. Countless in- 
stances ot Ins practical sympathy have been cited, all characteristics of the 
kindly spirit that made him a devoted husband and father and a faithful friend 
who was constantly extending a helping band to those who needed assistance. 



KDWAKI) J. HUGHES 



Among those lllinoisians who have achieved high rank in democratic 
political circles is Edward J. Hughes, a native of the state, and now holding 
the office of secretary of state. For over twenty years he has been in public 
service and has made an enviable record in every incumbency which he has 
filled. 

Edward J. Hughes was born July 26, 1888. He received his first education 
in the public schools, and then studied law. However, instead of entering the 
practice of this profession he went into engineering, and became the executive 
head of the the Northern Bridge Company, which organization made a specialty 
of structural steel and bridge construction work. 

Mr. Hughes first political position was that of state senator from the 
Twenty-first Senatorial District, in which capacity he served for four terms. 
He was first elected in 1914, and was re-elected in 1918, 1922 and 1926. Tax 
legislation was the field of his greatest and most important work in the 
legislative body, and he gained an outstanding reputation in this particular 
phase of law-making, with the result that he was elected in November, !!>•'!(). 
as a member of the Cook County Board of Review. It may be noted that he 
was still a member, and with five years to serve, when he assisted in the 
passage of the Kelly Bill which eliminated bis office. Mr. Hughes was demo- 
cratic floor leader in the house for a long time, and while such was instrumental 
in developing the now famous Illinois Research Hospital in Chicago. Later. 
he became deputy commissioner of public works in the city of Chicago, and 
while serving as such was nominated on the democratic ticket for secretary 
of state, to which office be was elected in November, 1932. Mr. Hughes has 
proved his worth in this high state position beyond all question, and his duties 
have been performed in a manner which has won the commendation of his 
supporters and political contemporaries. 

Mr. Hughes was married in the year 1920 to Winifred Ronayne of Chicago. 
and to their union there has been born a daughter, Mary Elizabeth. The 
family residence is situated at '-V-V-V.) Fulton Boulevard in the city of Chicago. 

Mr. Hughes is a member of the Western Society of Engineers, the 
Germania Club, the Chicago Athletic Club, and the Art Institute of Chicago. 



EMMETT WHEAL AN 

Emmett Whealan has 1 n a member of the Cook county board of com- 
missioners lor the past fifteen years and its president since 1931, and, at the 




EDWARD J. HUGHES 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 25 

primary election of April 10, 1934, he won the democratic nomination for mem- 
ber of the county board of tax appeals and was elected November 6, 1934. He 
has been a lifelong resident of Chicago, Illinois, born March 4, 1875, to James 
and Johanna (Dewey) Whealan. In the acquirement of an education he at- 
tended both public and parochial schools and also completed a course at Powers 
Business College of Chicago. Thereafter he was connected with the printing 
industry for more than a quarter of a century, being principally engaged in 
newspaper work prior to entering the real estate field. He is now a member 
of the well known real estate firm of Whealan & Byrne, with offices at 6239 
South Western avenue in Chicago, and is also a director of the McKeown 
Transportation Company of this city. 

Aside from his business interests Mr. Whealan has devoted considerable 
attention to political affairs as a supporter of the democratic party. He was a 
delegate from the third congressional district of Illinois to the democratic 
national convention at Houston, Texas, in 1928 and also a delegate for Illinois 
to the democratic national convention at Chicago in 1932. He has served as 
ward committeeman of the twenty-ninth (now fifteenth) ward of Chicago and 
in 1919 became a member of the Cook county board of commissioners, of which 
he has been president for the past three years. 

On the 8th of November, 1905, Mr. Whealan was united in marriage to 
Miss Catherine McDonald, of Chicago, and they are the parents of a son, James 
Emmett. The scope of his interests and activities is indicated by his member- 
ship in the Field Museum of Natural History, the Art Institute of Chicago, 
the Old Time Printers Association, the Typographical Union, the Knights of 
Columbus, the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the National Union, the Royal 
League, the Lake Shore Athletic Club and the Laramie Golf Club. 



ADOLPH .J. SABATH 



Adolph J. Sabath occupies an eminent position not only in democratic 
circles in Illinois but has also long been regarded as an outstanding figure in 
Washington, where he has the distinction of being dean of the congress, having 
served for twenty-eight years as representative from the fifth Illinois district. 
He has long exerted a widely felt influence over public thought and action 
and he has always been regarded as a close and discriminating student of 
vital governmental problems. A native of Czechoslovakia, he was born April 
4, 1866, and was a youth of fifteen years when he emigrated to the United 
States. His parents were Joachim and Barbara (Eissenschimmel) Sabath, who 
were also natives of Czechoslovakia, whence they came to the United States in 
1892, settling in Chicago, Illinois. 

Adolph J. Sabath began his education in his native country and continued 
his studies in night school in Chicago. He determined to become a member of 
the bar and matriculated in the Chicago College of Law. which conferred upon 
him the LL. B. degree at his graduation in 1891. The same year he was ad- 
mitted to practice at the Illinois bar and entered upon the active work of his 
profession. He pursued post-graduate work in Lake Forest University in 1892 
and he remained in the private practice of law until 1895, when he was elected 
a judge of the municipal court and served upon that bench for twelve years 
oi- until 1907. He had also become identified with the business interests of 
Chicago as a real estate dealer before entering upon active law practice, and 
lie has long enjoyed a position of leadership in professional ranks as a member 
of the well known law firm of Sabath, Perlman, Goodman & Rein, with offices 
at 10 South LaSalle street in Chicago. 

In recent years Mr. Sabath has given his attention largely to his public 
duties. He early allied himself with the democratic party and for four years 
was chairman of the central and executive committee of the democratic party 
of Cook county. Appreciation of his ability led to his selection in 1906 as the 



26 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

nominee of the fifth Illinois district for the sixtieth congress and at the sub- 
sequent flection he received the endorsement of the public, being accorded a 
large majority. He has been sent by popular suffrage to all subsequent con- 
gresses and for twenty-eight years has represented Ins district in the national 
halls of legislation, being now a member of the seventy-third congress. He 
was a close adviser to President Wilson during the World war. He has served 
as a member of the foreign affairs committee in the national house of repre- 
sentatives and on the emigration committee, and he was a member of the 
house committee that reported out the declaration of war with Germany. 
The congressional records bear testimony of the important part which he has 
played in shaping the history of the nation during the past twenty-eight years, 
as he has been active in promoting many measures of wide benefit. He has 
attended as a delegate all the state and national conventions since 1896 and he 
rode in the carriage with William Jennings Bryan when the Nebraskan was 
nominated for the presidency. There are few men in the entire country who 
have as wide an acquainance among the lawmakers of the nation and the 
political leaders of the United States as has Mr. Sabath. He is classed as a 
progressive, independent democrat. In a word he thinks for himself, studies 
closely all important legislative questions and supports the measures in whose 
value he has firm faith. In community affairs in an earlier day he was active 
and served as police magistrate from 1897 until 1907. His opinions carry great 
weight among the voters of Jewish and Bohemian blood. 

On the 31st of .December, 1917, in Chicago, Mr. Sabath was united in 
marriage to Miss May Ruth Fuerst, daughter of Otto and Anna Fuerst of this 
city. Her father was a well known writer for Bohemian newspapers and was 
an independent democrat in politics. Mr. Sabath belongs to the Washington 
Boulevard Temple and he is a prominent figure in fraternal and club circles. 
He is a Royal Arch Mason, a Knight of Pythias and a member of the Turners, 
the Royal League and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. His club 
relationships are with the Iroquois, the Standard, the Congressional Country, 
the Idlewild Country, Bohemian, Covenant and Press Clubs. He has left the 
impress of his individuality upon every organization or movement with which 
he has become associated, and working along constructive lines, he has builded 
wisely and well. What he has accomplished represents the opportunities Amer- 
ica furnishes to the foreign-born — but opportunities which are open only to men 
of ambition, of ability and of ideals. 



JOHN E. CASSIDY 



John E. Cassidy, a very popular and able attorney of Peoria, was appointed 
state director of the National Emergency Council for Illinois by President 
Franklin I). Roosevelt in January, 1934. He is yet a comparatively young man. 
but his position in professional and political circles is one of leadership. Mr. 
Cassidy was born in Ottawa, LaSalle county, Illinois, January 31, 1896, and is 
the son of Andrew I), and Margaret (Fox) Cassidy. His father and mother 
were also born at Ottawa, Illinois. His father's parents were John G. and Mary 
(Canty) Cassidy. The great-grandfather was Andrew Cassidy, a resident of 
Illinois for many years, the family having long been associated with the de- 
velopment of the state. He and his sister and four brothers, the former of whom 
died, crossed the Atlantic to the province of Quebec, Canada, about 1820 with 
their parents. They settled near Shipton and from that district Andrew 
Cassidy, great-grandfather of John E. Cassidy, came to Illinois, establishing 
his home near Caledonia, Illinois, but later moved to Livingston and then to 
LaSalle counties, this state. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Judith 
Riley, was born in Ireland. They had seven children. One of the sons, John 
G., was the grandfather of John E. Cassidy. 

The paternal grandmother of John E., the subject of this biography, was 
Mary (Canty) Cassidy. She came to the United States from Ireland about the 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 27 

year 1840 with her parents, Daniel and Mary (Hurley) Canty. They first 
settled in Ohio and then later moved to Illinois, making tlieir residence in this 
state before the Civil war. Daniel Canty, great-grandfather of John E. Cassidy, 
served with Illinois troops in that war and was killed at the battle of Atlanta. 
John G. Cassidy, grandfather of our subject also served with Illinois troops 
during the war. John G. Cassidy and Mary (Canty) Cassidy were married at 
Ottawa, Illinois about 1868. They were the parents of two children; Andrew 
I)., the father of John E., and Mary Cassidy, the wife of Adam Keim, a resident 
of Chicago. 

Margaret Fox, wife of Andrew I)., and mother of John E., married at 
Ottawa. Illinois, about 1894. Margaret (Pox) Cassidy was the daughter of 
Owen and Mary (O'Connell) Fox, both natives of Ireland, who settled at 
Ottawa in their early youth. They acquired farm lands and after the death of 
Owen Fox, when the large family were still children, the grandmother and 
older sons continued in that occupation near Ottawa, in LaSalle county. Andrew 
D. and Mary (Fox) Cassidy became the parents of a son and a daughter, John 
E., of this review, and Margaret, a resident of Chicago, Illinois. 

Public and parochial schools of Ottawa accorded John E. Cassidy his early 
educational opportunities and his later training was obtained in the university 
of Notre Dame, where he qualified for law practice, receiving his LL.B. degree 
in 1917. The same year he was admitted to the bar in Illinois. In May, 1917. he 
enlisted for service in the World war and was sent to Fort Sheridan. It was 
while en route from college to camp that he took the bar examination. At 
Fort Sheridan he was commissioned as second lieutenant and then sent over- 
seas to France, where he was put in a machine gun school at Chattalon Sur 
Seine. Having completed the required course of instruction he was assigned 
to duty with the 101st Machine Gun Battalion, 26th Division. He took part 
in every major combat of the A.E.F., served at Chemin dos Dames and also 
participated in the fighting in the Toul sector, the Battle of Chateau Thierry, 
in the Aisne-Marne offensive, and in the battles of St. Mihiel and both Argonne 
drives, being wounded in the second Meuse-Argonne Drive. In 1919 he was 
mustered out of the service at Camp Deven, in Boston, and was awarded the 
decoration of the Purple Heart, given only to wounded soldiers. This order 
was created by General George Washington and the first of the Purple Heart 
medals were given to wounded soldiers of the Revolutionary war. 

Mr. Cassidy began his law practice in Chicago, Illinois, where he was 
connected with the legal department of the Aetna Life Insurance Company. 
He was transferred to Peoria, Illinois, by the Aetna Life Insurance Company 
in 1920, continued one year, then in 1921 took up private practice in Peoria. 
Through the intervening period he has built up a clientele of large proportions. 
He has been connected with much litigation that has had to do with the courts 
of his district and his powers in forensic combat are widely acknowledged. 

Mr. Cassidy was married to Miss Susan C. Casey, who was born in Pe >ria, 
Illinois, a daughter of James J. and Isabella (Mellon) Casey. They have become 
the parents of six children, John, James, Susanne, Marilyn, Thomas and Colleen. 

Mr. Cassidy is a member of the American Legion and was a delegate to the 
convention for the repeal of the Illinois prohibition law, acting as committee 
chairman. He has always voted with the Democratic party and is recognized 
as one of its forceful and effective leaders. In 15)^2 he was elected as a district 
delegate from the sixteenth congressional district to the democratic national 
convention. In January, 19:54, he was appointed state director of the National 
Emergency Council for Illinois and thus assumed large responsibilities, to which 
he was most faithful. He belongs to the Peoria Country Club; the American 
Business Club of which he was the second president in Peoria, also for one 
year district governor; the University Club of Peoria; the Creve Coeur Club; 
the Knights of Columbus, in which he has taken the fourth degree; and the 
Spalding Assembly. He holds unswervingly to high professional standards 
and is a member of the Peoria, Illinois State and American Bar Associations. 



28 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

JOHN CUNNINGHAM MARTIN 

Descended trom ancestors who engaged in banking and having thorough 
training for many years himself as a banker, .John Cunningham Martin is par- 
ticularly well fitted for his present office as treasurer of the state of Illinois, and 
he has demonstrated in every manner this fact by his conduct of the financial 
and commercial duties of his position. 

John Cunningham Martin was born April 29, 1880 in Salem, Marion county, 
Illinois, where both the Cunningham and the Martin families lived since early 
years of the nineteenth century. Stanch ancestors on both sides of his family 
did much to hasten the development of that section of the state, and the his- 
tories of Marion county have much to say concerning them. Mr. Martin at- 
tended the public schools of Salem, then took up his higher studies at the Illi- 
nois College in Jacksonville. He returned to Salem after receiving his diploma 
and thereafter made that community his home, although in his capacity as state 
treasurer he is temporarily living in Springfield, the capital. 

After his return home, Mr. Martin immediately entered the banking busi- 
ness. He became associated with the financial institution which had been 
founded by his grandfather, John Cunningham, and of which his uncle, Gen. 
James Martin, and his father, Benjamin E. Martin, had served as president. 
John C. Martin himself later assumed the presidency of this bank. His work in 
banking soon became widely known and his reputation as an astute financier 
became greater each year. He was elected director of the Federal Reserve 
Bank in St. Louis in 1922 and was the incumbent until he resigned to take the 
office of state treasurer, to which he was elected in November, 1932, on the 
democratic ticket. This is the first public office held by Mr. Martin, as he 
never sought political preferment, rather choosing to be a strong supporter of 
the party and its principles. 

Mr. Martin is married, his wife's maiden name having been Margaret Bills, 
of Oak Park, Illinois. They have become the parents of three children, namely: 
.Mary Ann, John, Jr., and Barney. 

Mr. Martin is a member of the American Bankers Institute, the executive 
committee of the Boy Scouts of America, the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, the Masonic Order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the 
Rotary Club. His religious affiliation is with the Methodist P^piscopal Church. 



RT. REV. JOHN CIIANLER WHITE 

No man identified with Illinois Democracy holds a more respected and 
revered position than the Rt. Rev. John Chanler White, of Springfield, who 
is the Bishop of the Springfield Diocese of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 
His long service in the church and his personal character have brought to 
him a general recognition as a man of splendid endowments, of high faith, and 
deep understanding of his fellowmen. 

Bishop White was born in Laurens county, South Carolina, on the 21st of 
May, 1867, and is a son of Thomas Grimke and Martha Phoebe (Edings) White. 
The bishop is of distinguished ancestry, the first of his paternal line to come to 
America having been Col. Sir John White of Canterbury, England, who came 
across the Atlantic with William Penn. His wife, who was a Quaker, was, in her 
maidenhood, Mary Blake. His son. Blake Lee White, married Elizabeth Bour- 
quin, who was a cousin of General Lafayette, of Revolutionary war fame. One 
of their sons. James J. B. White, was a general in the army. John Blake White, 
another son. became famous as an artist and as a writer. He was born in 1781 
and died in 18.")9. He studied art in England, and was a pupil of the noted 

Benjamin West. Medals were received by him I'roi any sources in honor of 

the notable canvasses which he produced, and also for the plays which he 
wrote. His dramas were the first ever produced in South Carolina. It is 




JOHN C. -MARTIN 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 31 

interesting to note that he was likewise educated for the law. but devoted his 
life to artistic pursuits instead. John Blake White was twice married, his first 
wife having been Eliza Alston. He was married secondly to Anna Rachel 
Driscoll, and to this latter union there was horn Thomas Grimke White, the 
father of Bishop White. He was first a doctor in Bufort, South Carolina, and 
later engaged in the practice of law. He was a captain in the < lonfederate Army. 
South Carolina troops, during the Civil war. Thomas G. White was twice 
married, his first wife having been Ella Louise Edings, and to them there was 
born one son. Mr. White married secondly Martha Phoebe Edings. a sister of 
his first wife, and to this marriage there were born ten children, of whom one 
is Bishop White. Along other lines of his family, the bishop also is related to 
(Jen. Francis Marion and John C. Calhoun. 

Bishop White received his Bachelor of Arts degree from St. Stephen's 
College in Annandale, New York, in 18$$, and then graduated from the 
General Theological Seminary in 1891. His Doctor of Divinity degree was 
received from St. Stephen's S.T.D. General Theological Seminary. He was 
made a deacon in the church in 1891 and a priest in 1892. and then became 
rector of St. Paul's Protestant Episcopal Church in Rantoul, Illinois. Prom 
1891 until 1893, he was in charge of St. Thomas Church in Thomasboro, Illinois. 
From 1893 until 1897, he was chaplain and private secretary to Bishop Seymour 
and also had charge of Christ Church in Waverly, Illinois. From 1898 until 
1900 he was rector of tin 1 Holy Trinity Church, in Hartwell, Ohio, and of St. 
Paul's Church in East St. Louis from 1900 until 1909. His theological work 
was most thorough and his influence in the councils of the church became 
broad and enlightening. In 1909-10, he was general missionary of the Spring- 
field Diocese, and from 1916 until 192-1 he was rector of the Trinity Protestant 
Episcopal Church in Lincoln. Illinois. On February 19, 1924, he was elected 
Bishop of the Springfield Diocese and consecrated as its fourth bishop on 
May 14. 1924. Bishop White's diocese embraces a total of sixty counties in the 
state of Illinois and extends as far south as Cairo. 

On September 10, 1891, John Chanler White was united in marriage to 
-Katherine Dresser of Springfield, whose grandfather was the Rev. Dr. Charles 
Dresser, first rector of St. Paul's Episcopal Church of Springfield. He officiated 
at the wedding of Abraham Lincoln and built and sold to Mr. Lincoln the 
Lincoln Home on Eighth street. Springfield. To Bishop and Mrs. White have 
been born two children. Lieutenant Thomas Dresser White, who is military 
attache for the Air to the Oca Embasse, at Moscow 7 , and Katherine Virginia 
White. The Bishop is a thirty-second degree Mason and a member of the 
Knights Templar. His fraternity is the Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



HON. .JAMES M ANDREWS 

With many years of faithful service in public office and with a record of 
important ami beneficial achievements to his credit, the Hon. James McAndrews 
of Chicago, Illinois, holds eminent ranking in the democratic party of the state. 
His record in congress is one of which he may well he proud and the satisfaction 
it lias given to his constituents is well indicated by the number of years he has 
represented them in Washington, D. C. 

Mr. McAndrews was born in Chicago and here reared to young manhood, 
his home having been at Washington Boulevard and Western Avenue. In the 
public and parochial schools, he received his education, and as a youth he became 
associated with his father in business, which he continued to operate after the 
latter 's death. 

Political affairs, particularly on the West Side of the city, became matters 
of absorbing interest to Mi-. McAndrews when he was a young man. and he 
very soon became a figure in democratic circles. He displayed exceptional apti- 
tude in politics, and in 1894 was named as building commissioner of Chicago. 
He served in this capacity until the following year, hut was in this office again 



32 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

from 1897 until 1901. For over twenty years he was a member of the Democratic 
Central Committee, and for a decade was chairman of the West Side district, 
lie was also chairman of the executive committee of the central committee. 

In 1900, his popularity having grown by leaps and hounds, he was given 
the democratic nomination for Congress from the Fourth District, and he was 
elected. He served in the Fifty-seventh Congress, beginning in 1901, then was 
re-elected in 1902, and served in the Fifty-eighth Congress, representing the 
Fifth District. He retired in March, 1905, but in 1912 he was again elected, to 
represent the Sixth District, and by repeated elections served in the Sixty-third, 
Sixty-fourth, Sixty-fifth, and Sixty-sixth sessions, then retired in 1921. How- 
ever, his Congressional record was such that in 1932, after he had moved to the 
North side of Chicago, his friends again brought him forth as the democratic 
candidate for Congress from the Ninth district, and he was nominated but was 
defeated by Congressman Britten. Again, in 1934, he was nominated for the 
seat in ('ongress and elected November 6, 1934. Mr. McAndrews' committee 
record, particularly on the appropriations committee, was an outstanding feature 
of his years in Congress. He formed numerous friendships in Washington, even 
with such political opponents as Joseph (i. Cannon, and in every contact he 
made he inspired confidence and respect. On January 31, 1934 the Illinois Liquor 
Control Law was approved, and immediately afterward Mr. McAndrews was 
appointed as a member of the Liquor Control commission. 

Mr. McAndrews is married and has three children, the family residence being 
situated at 2440 Lake Vier Avenue in the city of Chicago. 



HON. CORNELIUS J. HARRINGTON 

One of the younger democrats of Cook county, Illinois, who has won con- 
spicuous success in public affairs and in political circles, is Cornelius J. Har- 
rington, who has recently been elected to the circuit court bench in Cook county, 
and who has made remarkable progress during the years since he entered the 
practice of law. He well exemplifies the spirit of modern democracy, the will- 
to-win which has carried the party to the forefront in the state, and has given 
added prestige to the party made famous by such men as Douglas, Altgeld 
and Dunne. 

Cornelius J. Harrington is a native son of Chicago. His birth occurred in 
this city on the 5th of August, 1897, and his parents were natives of Ireland. 
The parochial and city schools supplied him with his first education, but his 
studies were suddenly interrupted after the United States declared war against 
Germany. When nineteen years of age, he enlisted in Battery I). One Hundred 
and Forty-ninth United States Field Artillery, which unit had formerly been 
the First Illinois Field Artillery, and was attached to the famous Rainbow 
Division, destined for overseas duty. Judge Harrington went overseas with his 
outfit in October, 1917. and thereafter was in France and Germany for a period 
of eighteen months. He saw real service. He was engaged in five major 
offensives and defensives, including the Chainpagne-Marne, the Aisne-Marne, 
St. Mihiel, and the Meuse-Argonne. The armistice having been signed, he was 
honorably discharged on May 1!), 1919, and returned to the United States. 
Having long previously decided upon the law as his life's work, he resumed his 
legal studies at De Paul University College of Law, and from this institution 
received his Bachelor of Laws degree in 1921 and his Master of Laws in 1922. 
Judge Harrington began the actual practice of law in Chicago in 1921. when 
he became associated with the well-known law firm of McCormick, Kirkland, 
Patterson & Fleming. With this highly reputable firm he gained valuable and 
important legal experience for himself, for his later work before the bar. 
Litigation of importance was assigned to him, and in all cases he acquitted 
himself brilliantly. He eventually became a member of the board of election 
commissioners for the city of Chicago and for one year specialized in cases 
dealing with election contests. In 1923, he was appointed master of chancery 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 33 

in the superior court of the city of Chicago to Judge John J. Sullivan, 
and in 1929 he received his appointment to this responsible position for the 
fourth consecutive time. He was also counsel for the Board of Assessors as for 
the democratic party in Cook county. His election to the bench of the Circuit 
Court of Cook county, is tribute to his proved ability in legal affairs and popu- 
larity among his fellow-citizens. 

Judge Harrington was married to Miss Carolyn Speer, and to them have 
been born three children, namely: Cornelius, Robert, and James. 

Judge Harrington is a member of the Phi Alpha Delta law fraternity, and 
belongs to the Knights of Columbus, the La Salle Assembly, the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, the Illinois Athletic Club, and the Crystal Lake 
Country Club. Civic affairs of Chicago have always received his devoted atten- 
tion and he has always been a contributor and cooperator in all affairs pertaining 
to the public welfare. 



HON. J. PAUL CALIFF 

The record made by the bench and bar of Illinois constitutes a most important 
chapter in the history of the state. The representatives of the legal profession 
have on the whole held to high standards and in this connection mention should 
be made of Hon. J. Paul Califf, of Aledo, who is now circuit judge, having the 
distinction of being the first democrat ever elected to this office in the fourteenth 
circuit. Back of his service on the bench he had broad experience in law 
practice, having been connected with much of the most important litigation 
heard in the courts of western Illinois for more than two decades. 

The Judge is a native of Hancock county, this state, born April 27, 1885. 
His parents were John A. and Martha A. Califf, both of whom have now passed 
away. The father was an active democrat, widely known to the leaders of the 
party throughout the state. He served as county superintendent of schools of 
Hancock county for twelve years and the cause of public education found in 
him a stalwart champion and one whose labors were far-reaching and beneficial. 
He also represented his district in the forty-fifth general assembly and he was 
a member of the board of the Illinois State Reformatory at Pontiac. His opinions 
carried weight in party councils and his influence was an effective force in 
winning party victories. 

After attending the public schools of Hancock county, J. Paul Califf began 
reading law under the direction of Judge Charles S. Scofield. He thoroughly 
mastered the basic principles of the profession and in 1909 was admitted to 
the bar, after winch he entered upon active practice, in which he successfully 
engaged for fourteen years. He then became secretary to Floyd Thompson, 
Justice of the Supreme Court, at Rock Island and occupied that position for 
five years, at the end of which period he located in Aledo, where in 1928 he 
formed a law partnership with F. L. Church. That association was maintained 
for six years, at the end of which time Mr. Califf was appointed circuit judge to 
fill out an unexpired term, and in June, 1933, he was elected to the office. His 
record on the bench is one over which there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion 
of evil. He has been fair and impartial in his rulings and his wide knowledge 
of the law makes his opinions a correct expression of the legal principles ap- 
plicable to the points at issue. This was not the first time that .Judge Califf was 
called to office. While living in Carthage, Hancock county, he was elected mayor 
of that city and gave to it a businesslike and progressive administration. He 
also served as president of the board of education and, like his father, was 
most faithful to the best interests of the public schools. He has Long been an 
outstanding figure in democratic circles. For many years he was secretary of 
the Hancock county democratic central committee and soon after his removal 
to Mercer county became chairman of the county central committee, continuing 
to act in that capacity until his appointment to the bench. During the Roosevelt- 
Horner campaign he was a member of the state campaign managing committee, 



34 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

which \v;is composed of twenty-two men. He has firm belief in the party 
principles, to which he is mosl loyal, although in accordance with the ethics of 
the profession, be has taken do active pari in party work since his elevation to 
the bench. 

In June, 1909, Judge Califf was united in marriage to .Miss Ethel Bgbers, 
of Hancock county. Illinois, and they are the parents of two children, Junis I*. 
and William. Fraternally Judge Califf is a Mason of high rank, having become 
a Knight Templar, while in the Scottish Rite he has attained the thirty-second 
degree. He also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles, and the rules that have ever governed his conduct are further 
indicated in the fact that he has long been a consistent member of the Christian 
( Jhurch. 



EDWARD JOSEPH KELLY 

The measure of success of Edward Joseph Kelly, mayor of Chicago, is found 
in the many tangible services which he has contributed to the upbuilding and 
progress of the municipality. There are few public projects that have been 
instituted and developed during the past three decades that have not benefited 
by his support and influence, and as mayor he is giving to the city a business- 
like administration that notwithstanding the unusual depression lias resulted 
in many forward movements. Moreover, Mr. Kelly is a splendid example of the 
American self-made man--the man to whom difficulties serve as an impetus to 
further effort and whose life lias been actuated by a spirit of continuous ad- 
vancement. 

Born of poor parents in Chicago, May 1, 1876, he is a son of Stephen and 
Helen (Lang) Kelly. He attended public school and night schools and studied 
under private tutors, while later he received the LL. D. degree from the Univer- 
sity of Notre Dame in 1928, but early in life he had to go to work and has prac- 
tically educated himself by personal study. He started his engineering career 
as an axman with the Sanitary District of Chicago at a salary of only sixty-two 
dollars per month but gradually worked Ins way upward, filling every position 
in the Sanitary District engineering department up to and including that of chief 
engineer, continuing with the department through all of the changes in political 
power. At Governor Dunne's request he was "loaned" to the state of Illinois 
to serve on the first waterway board and was instrumental in passing deep 
waterway legislation favorable to the waterway from Chicago to the Mississippi 
River. 

The skill which he had displayed in engineering circles, combined with his 
loyalty in the discharge of every public duty, led to his appointment as South 
Park Commissioner in May, 1922, by unanimous vote of the non-partisan circuit 
court judges, and the excellent service rendered in this capacity led to his re- 
appointment for three successive terms. In March, 1!)24, he was elected presi- 
dent of the South Park Board and has continuously acted in that capacity 
through the intervening period down to 1934. Under his administration the 
South Park Board has attained and maintained sound financial strength — the 
only municipality in this area which has consistently paid its bills and its em- 
ployees during the period of depression. In his executive capacity on the board. 
Mr. Kelly directed the transformation of Grand Park from a "tin can dumping 
grounds" to one of the most beautiful parks in the world. He was instrumental 
in building the great stadium known as Soldier's Field and .supervised the 
memorable Army-Navy game which was held there and which is regarded as the 
greatest event of its kind ever held anywhere. He also supervised the Dempsey- 
Tunney fight at the Stadium, as well as a number of other sporting events that 
have drawn national attention and support. He perfected plans for handling 
large crowds that have been copied and adopted all over the world. 

It was Mr. Kelly who engineered the building of the outer drive on the 
south side of Chicago, and largely through his personal efforts the old Fine Arts 




EDWARD J. KELLY 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 37 

building of the World's Columbian Exposition was saved and rebuilt to become 
one of the world's most beautiful structures, now housing the Rosenwald In- 
dustrial Museum. 

As president of the South Park Board, Mr. Kelly took a most active and 
resultful part in making arrangements for and developing a Century of Progress 
Exposition. He lias been one of the main advocates of the outer link bridge at 
the mouth of the Chicago River to relieve the north and south traffic. A num- 
ber of city parks have come into existence through his efforts, including one 
of twenty-six acres in the colored district. Also he was instrumental in securing 
equipment and facilities for developing children's health and welfare in many 
of the parks of Chicago. He formulated the plans and officially supervised 
the building of a number of the most beautiful boulevards of the city, and 
he has been a leader in Chicago's fight to secure sufficient lake water withdrawal 
to adequately care for Chicago's sewage needs. 

Mr. Kelly was selected mayor of Chicago, much against his wishes, by unani- 
mous vote of the city council, including both republican and democratic members. 
Assuming the duties of the position, he organized the mayor's office on a strictly 
sound business basis. Among his early official acts was the appointment to the 
city cabinet of men and women of established integrity and ability. He was 
the first major public official to inaugurate and maintain a courtesy drive among 
public servants in all departments, and as a result Chicago police officers were 
commended by people from all parts of the world for their courtesy and in- 
terested service to World's Fair visitors. It was Mayor Kelly who divorced 
politics from the police department, and he steadily refuses to allow any inter- 
ference with the police properly enforcing the laws. He also established the 
system of reward-for-merit in the fire department as well as all other city depart- 
ments, and he re-established confidence in the civil service commission by con- 
sistently demanding full protection of civil service rights and rigid adherence to 
high standards of justice, fairness and efficiency in civil service appointments 
and promotions. 

Mayor Kelly is constantly on duty in his office from nine o'clock in the 
morning until seven or eight o'clock in the evening, and very often his Sundays 
are devoted to municipal duties. Since taking up his present position as chief 
executive of America 's second city he has the endorsement of people of all politi- 
cal creeds, evidence of this fact being seen in the splendid support and co-opera- 
tion he has constantly received from the city's leaders in business, professional 
and social circles. He has done much to restore Chicago's fair name. Personally 
he has directed an intensive and relentless campaign against gangsters and hood- 
lums and has practically driven those elements from Chicago, thus bringing 
about a material reduction in crime. Through his campaign of "cleaning up 
Chicago" he has promoted new confidence in and increased respect for the city 
by other cities and peoples all over the world, and editorials in newspapers 
throughout America praise Chicago for its fine police work and the wonderful 
progress made against organized crime. Racketeer labor organizations iiave 
learned to fear Mayor Kelly, and throueh his co-operation with the state's attor- 
ney and legitimate labor unions and officials, the outlaw unions have been vir- 
tually banished from Chicago and business concerns of the city have been saved 
millions of dollars which formerly they were forced to pay out in unnecessary 
and unlawful tribute. The United States Senate investigating committee which 
recently investigated crime conditions in Chicago, congratulated the mayor, the 
state's attorney and other law-enforcing officials here for their effective work 
in the elimination of gangs, rackets, etc. 

Mayor Kelly has also contributed to the material prosperity of Chicago by 
his personally successful efforts in bringing a large number of conventions here, 
with thousands of visitors coming to spend money and increase business activities. 
Mayor Kelly has made approximately six hundred speeches before conventions, 
associations, organizations, schools, clubs, etc., during his first year as mayor. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

He studies every municipal problem with thoroughness and presents his subjed 
with clearness and logic. His attitude in relation to the schools is well known to 
the public, his labors resulting in taking Chicago's school children out of mi- 
sanitary, disease-breeding portables and putting them back into warm, substan- 
tial, healthful school buildings. Soon after he became mayor he secured a cash 
pay day for unpaid school teachers and thus averted a most serious situation, 
lie lent every ounce of energy and effort to get funds for the board of education 
in order that the unpaid teachers could have their back salaries brought up to 
date. He made personal appeals to the legislature in behalf of the teachers, 
secured the co-operation of Chicago bankers in raising cash for teachers' pay 
and made trips to Washington, where he pled for federal relief for the teachers. 
Chicago teachers have received their pay in full through the efforts of Mavor 
Kelly. 

.Mayor Kelly's efforts resulted in securing pay days for city employees 
who were five and one-half months in arrears until their pay days are now only 
six weeks behind, with the prospects bright for this indebtedness being soon 
wiped out. Constantly studying the institutions of the city. Mayor Kelly has 
seen that the House of Correction is operated at the greatest point of efficiency 
ever reached by that institution. The Municipal Tuberculosis Sanitarium is 
now the model of achievement in administration, competent technical men and 
women having been retained and appointed to positions there regardless of 
political creed, while the patients are better cared for than in any other such 
institution in the world. 

From the municipal financial standpoint, the records show that during the 
first eight months of his administration Mayor Kelly saved over three million 
dollars to the taxpayers by forcing needed economies, and at the same lime 
increased the efficiency of service rendered to the public. Under his guidance 
the city expenses have been reduced to approximately sixty-seven million dollars 
a year- -a savings of about forty-five million dollars annually to the taxpayers. 
Moreover, the expenses of the board of education have been reduced about 
twenty-seven million dollars a year. These figures definitely indicate the kind of 
service that Mayor Kelly is rendering to Chicago. He personally sat in with 
the city's budget-makers so that he could watch over the budget first hand and 
thus keep the tax levies down by insisting on the elimination of appropriation 
not actually needed in times of financial stress. 

Mayor Kelly organized the Chicago Recovery Administration, patterned 
after the National Recovery Administration, for the purpose of creating a non- 
partisan organization of business, professional, social and governmental leaders 
to study urgent civic problems and make necessary recommendations for im- 
provement of government and reduction of taxes. The Chicago Recovery Ad- 
ministration has on various occasions amply demonstrated its power toward ac- 
complishing benefits for the public good. 

To Mayor Kelly must be attributed the establishment of the Keep Chicago 
Ahead committee of leading business men. a committee pursuing an active cam- 
paign to stimulate Chicago's business activities and now in the midst of plans 
for a nation-wide campaign of publicity to bring millions of visitors to A Cen- 
tury of Progress Exposition in 1934 and to Chicago as a summer resort, thus 
advancing business and local employment. Mayor Kelly conceived and put into 
force Chicago's Own Christmas Benefit, a gigantic charitable benefit which 
was conducted by leading business men with the aid of the democratic organiza- 
tion and which provided new outfits of clothing and shoes to more than thirty 
thousand of Chicago's poor and needy children at the Christmas season of 1933 

Every vital public question awakens his interest, and his belief in any pro- 
ject means his unfaltering and adequate support of the cause. When the milk 
strike threatened enormous loss of property and possible loss of life, he called 
the warring factions into his office, and induced them to call off their strike 
and submit their differences to an arbitration board. Through personal appeal 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 39 

to Washington, he secured the Department of Agriculture milk hearing in 
Chicago, with the result that retail price of delivered milk was reduced two cents 
a quart. 

Mayor Kelly displayed a most courageous spirit in urging the city council 
to discard the old traction ordinance as being obsolete and unfair to the public 
and recommended a completely new ordinance which will not only contain all 
the important benefits of the old one, such as universal transfers, etc.. but also 
a number of new advantages to the city and to the public. 

It was through the co-operation of Mayor Kelly that the national convention 
of the American Legion in 1933 was such an exceptional success. Hundreds 
of letters have been received from Legion offcials throughout the United States 
commending the mayor for the marvelous treatment and service accorded Legion 
members by the police and other public employees, and Legion officials have 
posted ten thousand dollars to secure the return of the national convention to 
Chicago. 

Mayor Kelly, moreover, deserves the distinction of being the first Chicagoan 
to demand publicly, subject to the wish of the people, that A Century of Prog- 
ress Exposition reopen in 1934. He made the demand upon the World's Fair 
officials and those financially interested witli the result that Chicago had its 
second exposition with the resulting increase of business and emplovment as 
well as a further opportunity to build up the city's reputation to still higher 
standards. 

Chicago's mayor assisted in formulating and developing the plans for the 
Eucharistic Congress held at Soldier's Field. Activities for the cultural bene- 
fit of Chicago have received his strong and helpful endorsement and he is now 
serving as a trustee of the Art Institute, while ex-officio he is a member of the 
Chicago Plan Commission. He belongs to the Chicago Association of Commerce, 
in which he is serving as a member of the ways and means and of the traffic and 
aviation committees. Strictly along the line of his profession, he is connected 
with the Western Society of Engineers and with the American Society of 
Engineers. In club circles, too, he is well known, having membership in the 
Chicago Athletic, Illinois Athletic, Press, South Shore Country, Beverly Country. 
Union League and Chicago Yacht Clubs. Mayor and Mrs. Kelly reside at 4821 
Ellis Avenue with their three children : Joseph, Patricia, and Stephen. 

Such in brief is the life story of Edward .Joseph Kelly. His history is 
still in the making. Day by day he is laboring on, accomplishing results that 
are far-reaching, and the municipality of Chicago is to be congratulated upon the 
businesslike and humanitarian administration which he is rendering to it. 



VICTOR KLEBBA 



Victor Klebba is director of public relations of the city of Chicago. Born 
of a family imbued with the principles of democracy for several generations, 
it was* natural that Victor Klebba should in his adult life become a factor in 
democratic politics in his adopted city. Chicago. 

His grandfather, John Walker, one of the early pioneers in Nebraska, 
was for years a state democratic leader, being one of William Jennings Bryan's 
most intimate friends and political associates. His father, Frank T. Klebba. 
was prominent in democratic circles in central Nebraska. 

Victor Klebba first saw the light of day in Humphrey, Nebraska, a small 
community located in the north central part of Nebraska, on April 1<>. 1892. 
It was here that he spent his childhood days, part of the time on the farm and 
part in the village, where he attended the local school. In 1907 his family moved 
to Omaha, Nebraska, where he attended and graduated from high school. After 
completing a full course at commercial college, he entered the employ of the 



40 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Burlington Railroad, advancing in position until he became the local depot ticket 
agenl for that company. He then spent five years in the real estate and insur- 
ance business with his uncle, Frank T. Walker, a close associate of Arthur Mullen, 
who was so prominent in the Roosevelt campaign as state democratic committee- 
man from Nebraska. 

Being of large physical stature and athletically inclined, young Victor be- 
came interested in the sport of wrestling and, after making a worth-while show- 
ing against the late Frank Gotch at the age of nineteen years, decided to come 
to Chicago to seek his future in that game. A severe case of ptomaine poisoning, 
however, altered his plans and he entered the employ of the Chicago, Rock 
Island & Pacific Railroad as a draftsman in the engineering department. 

Then came the World war and young Klebba was one of the first to enlist, 
serving for a time with the Medical Corps of the United States Army and 
later transferring to the Railway Engineers, lie served an enlistment period 
of two and one-half years, a year and a half of it with the A. E. F. in France. 
In his military service, he was steadily promoted until he reached the grade of 
senior master engineer, the army's highest non-commissioned office. For his ex- 
cellent service in France he was cited in general orders by the Commander-in- 
Chief of the A. E. F., General John J. Pershing, and later, in 1932, was deco- 
rated with the Order of the Purple Heart as the result of Pershing's citation. 
He also received the decoration of the Order of Zeal from the late King Nicholas 
of Montenegro for services rendered that country. 

After receiving his honorable discharge from the army in 1919, he returned 
to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he married Miss Marie McNaughton, a resident 
of that city, and entered the mail order advertising business there. After three 
years in Minneapolis, he was brought back to Chicago by Butler Brothers, the 
world's largest wholesale mail order house, to be their general advertising and 
correspondence counsel, which position he held for several years. He then 
became advertising and sales promotion manager for a large Chicago syndicate 
newspaper service, at which work he continued for three years, or until he 
established Superior Advertising Service, his own advertising agency. After 
two years in the agency business, he received and accepted a flattering offer 
from Dr. Herman N. Bundesen, who at that time was the director of health 
of the Sanitary District of Chicago. On Dr. Bundesen 's election to the office of 
coroner of Cook county (the campaign being managed by Klebba) the doctor 
appointed Mr. Klebba as his chief deputy. In this position he made a close and 
complete study of the law of this office and its administrative duties with the 
result that he developed an entirely new and effective policy of administration, 
also assisting materially in the saving of over seventy-five thousand dollars of the 
taxpayers' money during the first years of Dr. Bundesen's incumbency. 

Resigning the office of chief deputy coroner, Mr. Klebba again entered the 
advertising business for himself, in which connection he was called to handle 
the country towns campaign for State Senator Thomas J. Courtney in his race 
for the office of state's attorney for Cook county. The results of Klebba 's 
efforts were so pronounced that the then mayor of Chicago, the late Anton J. 
Cermak, sighting promising material for the Democratic party, placed lids 
young and capable executive in the position of director of public relations for the 
city of Chicago, a position which he has retained through the tenures of office 
of the late Mayor Frank J. Corr and the present mayor, Edward J. Kelly. In 
this position he had numerous important duties, preparing publicity and 
speeches, handling the city hall radio programs, taking care of most of the 
mayor's personal and official correspondence, conducting preliminary interviews 
with callers upon themavor. handling all the convention matters of the city 
and being in charge of the mayor's representatives at various functions, many 
times acting as the mayor's representative himself. In this busy round of 
duties he has made numerous fine contacts and has gained countless friends for 
Mayor Kelly and the democratic party. As a reward and recognition of his 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 41 

loyal, intelligent and capable service, Mayor Kelly appointed him as acting city 
sealer in May, 1934, a position which he still holds, having made a number of 
physical and administrative improvements which have evoked merited admiration 
from all his observers. 

Mr. Klebba lives with his wife and three boys at 5661 Neva avenue (Norwood 
Park), Chicago, in the 41st ward, where he has been a helpful ally to Committee- 
man Thomas J. Bowler. Klebba was the organizer and is the ward representative 
of the 41st Ward United Democratic Service Men, a group which has been loyal 
and energetic in the promotion of democratic principles and candidates. He is 
also active in a number of Polish organizations, being of Polish ancestry himself. 
He is a public speaker of note, especially in the newspaper and advertising field, 
where he has made over two hundred speeches, including one before the Inter- 
national Advertising Association convention. 

Mr. Klebba speaks four languages. His spare time hobbies are music, fish- 
ing and photography. He is the designer and co-editor of many of Dr. Buncle- 
sen's famous baby books. He is at present a captain in the Quartermaster 
Reserve of the United States Army. 

Illinois. Democracy is proud to tell the story of this young democrat, the 
newer type of public servant, and we confidently look forward to still greater 
achievements on his part — achievements which will reflect credit not only upon 
himself but also upon Mayor Edward J. Kelly and Thomas J. Bowler, his spon- 
sors, and the democratic party at large. 



JAMES R. BRYANT 



James R. Bryant, Master in Chancery of the Superior Court of Cook 
County, was nominated for his present office by Judge Francis S. Allegretti. 
He is a well known attorney who has long been active and prominent in con- 
nection with civic affairs, and his professional experiences and public activities 
well qualify him for the duties of his present position. 

Mr. Bryant was born in Harrisonville, Missouri, September 25, 1891, and is 
a son of Hayne Ruble and Sarah Jane (Ryan) Bryant. He is of old American 
ancestory, his ancestors having followed that stream of immigration which led 
from Virginia and North Carolina to Kentucky, and from Kentucky to Missouri. 
He received his public school and high school education in his native town, and 
went from there to the University of Missouri, where, in 1913, he received an 
A. B. degree. 

Subsequent to graduation, he went to the Philippine Islands, where for 
three years he was an educational administrator in the public schools, working 
a portion of his time with the so-called "head-hunting" tribes of the mountains. 

Upon his return from the Philippine Islands in 1916 he entered the Uni- 
versity of Chicago Law School. In 1917 he attended the Second Officers' Train- 
ing Camp at Fort Sheridan, Illinois, and was commissioned a second lieutenant 
and was assigned to the Three Hundred and Thirty-sixth Infantry of the Eighty- 
fourth Division. He was in the army service of the United States for twenty 
months, seven months of which were spent in France. Upon his return he re- 
entered the University of Chicago Law School and received the J. D. degree 
therefrom in 1920. 

He was admitted to the bar in 1920 and, for thirteen years after entering 
the practice of law, was associated with an organization of which Adolf Kraus, 
Judge Clarence N. Goodwin and Julius F. Smietanka were members. On the 
1st of October, 1933, he opened law offices at 135 South LaSalle street, where 
James A. Daley is associated with him in general practice. 

He married Elizabeth Pierreman Sampson of Louisville, Kentucky, in 1!>2(), 
and lives with her and their three children, Martha Sampson, James Ryan, Jr.. 
and Elizabeth Jane, at 6319 Louise avenue, Chicago. 



42 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Mr. Bryanl has long been active in politics in the forty-first ward of which 
Mr. Thomas J. Bowler is the ward committeeman. He is a believer in pure 
democracy and he supports his position by logical and convincing argument. 

Mr. Bryanl belongs to the Chicago Bar Association and to the Phi Delta 
Phi, a legal fraternity. He has membership in the Masonic bodies and in the 
University Club of Chicago. He finds recreation and interest in his garden 
and flowers and his hobby is antique furniture and its restoration. Upon these 
various subjects he is largely an authority. He has been prominent in the 
American Legion and was chairman of the committee that amended the state 
constitution enabling the old Cook County association to become part of the 
Legion structure and be known as the Cook County Council. He also headed 
the committee drafting the constitution for that council. He has been an active 
officer of Advertising Men's Post, No. 38. The interests of his life are thus 
varied and have a broadening influence, bringing him into touch with many. 
At the same time his chosen life work receives due attention and the record 
which he has made both as a practicing attorney and as Master in Chancery 
is one that reflects credit and honor upon his chosen calling. 



ROBERT M. SWEITZER 

It would be difficult to find a man who occupies a warmer place in public 
regard than Kobert M. Sweitzer. it is not only the supporters of the democratic 
party who give him their confidence and respect but also of the opposition as 
well — a fact indicated by the large majorities that have been accorded him when 
he has been a candidate for office. In November, 1910, he was elected county 
clerk of Cook county and for twenty-four consecutive years has filled the position. 

Born in Chicago, May 10, 1868, Mr. Sweitzer is a son of Martin J. and Sarah 
(Lamping) Sweitzer, the former a Civil war veteran who served with an Illinois 
infantry regiment. Kobert M. Sweitzer attended the public schools of Chicago, 
followed by study in St. Patrick's Commercial Academy and in the Christian 
Brothers College of St. Louis, Missouri, which conferred upon him the honorary 
Master of Arts degree. He initiated his business career as a clerk with W. F. 
McLaughlin & Company of Chicago and from 1885 until 1893 was with the 
James H. Walker Company as a general salesman, while subsequently he held 
;i similar position with the John V. Farwell Company from 1893 until 1910. It 
was then that he was called to public office, having been elected county clerk 
of Cook county in November of that year. His incumbency in the position has 
covered six consecutive terms of four years each, extending until December. 
1934. At the primaries in April, 1934, he was made the party's candidate For 
county treasurer, subject to the vote of the people in the November election. 
Twice he was the unsuccessful nominee for mayor of Chicago, but in those years — 
1911 and 1915 — the city went republican. 

On the 3rd of August, 1904, in Chicago, Mr. Sweitzer married Miss Alice 
Jane Kevil, also of this city, and they have a son and two daughters: Robert 
M., Jr., Alice and Margaret. The family hold membership in the Roman Catholic 
( liurch. being connected with Our Lady of Sorrows parish, and in church work 
Mr. Sweitzer has taken active and helpful part. He is vice president and gen- 
eral manager of the Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Chicago and 
has the distinction of having been, the founder of this work, for which lie was 
knighted, receiving from Pope Pius XI the decoration of Knight of St. Gregory 
the (Jreat, which was conferred on him May 29, 1924. He is also a member of 
the Knights of Columbus and the Elks. 

During the World War Mr. Sweitzer served on the State Council of Defense 
and was chairman of the committee on coordination. He belongs to the Chicago 
Athletic Association, the Illinois Athletic Club, the Olympia Fields Country 
Club, the Chicago Riding Club, the Chicago Yacht Club and the Chicago 
Schutzen Verein. He finds his recreation largely in golf and reading and he is 




ROBERT M. SWEITZER 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 45 

always an entertaining speaker, his services being much in demand as a public 
speaker and as chairman and toastmaster at banquets. His office in the county 
building is adorned by many friendly tokens — gifts from his admirers and 
associates. One of his pronounced characteristics is his recognition of the good 
in his fellowmen, manifest in a sincere and abiding interest in and helpfulness 
toward all with whom he comes in contact. 



CHARLES H. WEBER 



The history of democracy in Cook county would be incomplete and un- 
satisfactory were there failure to make reference to Charles H. Weber, who is 
now serving as county commissioner. He was born in Chicago, August 13, 1894, 
and is a son of Joseph A. Weber, now living retired. The son attended St. 
Alphonsus school and afterward entered De Paul University, where he completed 
his education save for the valuable lessons which he is continually learning 
through experience. He is now active in the real estate field and is thoroughly 
informed concerning property values in the metropolis. 

During the World war period Mr. Weber served with the American Expe- 
ditionary Forces, being in France for thirteen months. He was formerly a first 
sergeant and is now a captain in the Illinois National Guard and has been aide 
to General Keehn, commanding general of the state guard. He belongs to the 
American Legion, to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights 
of Columbus and the Catholic Order of Foresters, and something of the nature of 
his recreation is indicated in the fact that he holds membership in the Chicago 
Yacht Club. His political endorsement has always been given to the democratic 
party and he was ward committeeman of the forty-fifth ward for eight years. He 
served as a member of the legislature from the sixth district and was the wet 
leader of the house during his connection with the general assembly. He ran for 
congress in the tenth congressional district and was defeated by only seven 
hundred votes, although the district is overwhelmingly republican and has never 
been represented by a democrat. The large vote which he polled was proof of 
his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in him. He is now serving 
as county commissioner, having been elected for a four years' term, and is re- 
garded as a most active and dependable member of the board. 



JOHN ALBERT CERVENKA 

In the spring of 1931 John Albert Cervenka was appointed by Anton .J. 
Cermak, then mayor of Chicago, to the office of city purchasing agent, and 
under his direction this Chicago department has been put upon a high plane 
of efficiency. Altogether Mr. Cervenka has been connected with public service 
in this city for more than twenty years and his course is one which has gained 
for him the highest commendation, while his activities have been of great public 
benefit. He has ever closely studied municipal needs and possibilities and with 
broad vision he has directed his efforts along constantly broadening lines to the 
benefit of the entire city. 

Born in Bohemia, now Czechoslovakia, on the 5th of February, 1870, he is 
the son of John and Marie (Holub) Cervenka. His early education was obtained 
in the grammar schools of his native land, but when he was a lad of twelve 
years his parents brought their family to the new world, settling in Chicago al 
a time when the city bore little resemblance to the present modern metropolis. 
For more than a half century John A. Cervenka has watched the development 
of Chicago and has taken an active part in furthering its interests in many 
ways, being at all times on the side of progress and improvement. In 1886 he 
started out in the business world as a cabinetmaker's apprentice and while 
working and learning the trade during the day, he attended nighl school in 
order to further his own education. This is characteristic of the man, for he 
has always been a seeker after knowledge and has armed himself with first- 
hand information on many subjects, especially on those questions which have 



46 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

had to <ln with the genera] welfare. In the year 1899 he entered the restaurant 
business, which proved the forerunner of the Pilsen Brewing Company, which 
he organized in 1903 and of which he became president and general manager, 
his enterprising methods and indefatigable energy resulting in the upbuilding 
of a business of large proportions. 

Mr. Cervenka entered public life in 1!)1(), at which time the democratic 
party in the interests of harmony selected him as its candidate for clerk of the 
probate court. He was elected to the office in the fall of that year and his capa- 
bility and his popularity were such that he was re-elected in 1914, serving for 
two full terms or eight years. In 1!)2:>, when William E. Dever became mayor 
of Chicago. Mr. Cervenka was elected to the office of city treasurer and again 
his record was in harmony with the high ideals of official service. In the spring 
of 1931, following the election of Anton .J. Cermak to the mayoralty, he ap- 
pointed Mr. Cervenka as the city purchasing agent, and under the latter's able 
management the department has been reorganized materially and a system of 
fair dealing established. He does not play favorites but makes purchases ac- 
cording to merit in whatever is desired. He has acquired intimate and com- 
prehensive knowledge concerning values and has administered the office in a 
most efficient manner, improving upon former methods and introducing the 
high standards which are followed under his guidance. 

Mr. Cervenka was united in marriage to Antonie Bolek, who is also a native 
of Czechoslovakia, and to them have been born two children: Alice, who is now 
the wife of Harry Rohde, of Chicago; and John A., Jr., who is a graduate of 
tlie Chicago-Kent College of Law and is now a practicing attorney of Chicago. 

Mr. Cervenka, as a lifelong democrat and an outstanding representative 
of the people of his nationality in this country, had the distinction of being 
appointed to represent the United States at Praha, Czechoslovakia, on the oc- 
casion of the unveiling of the statue of President Wilson there. As a member 
of the Chicago planning commission he was the first appointee from Bohemian 
circles made by Carter H. Harrison. He is a member of the Czechoslovakia 
National Council of America and is also a member and the president of the 
Czechoslovakia National Alliance. In a word he is keenly interested in the wel- 
fare of his fellow countrymen and cooperates heartily in any movement which 
tends to benefit the people of his nationality. He is a member of the Bohemian 
Club and the Bohemian Arts Club and is prominent in Masonic circles, having 
attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in the consistory, while 
with the Nobles of Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine he has crossed the 
sands of the desert. He is likewise an Odd Fellow and the various organizations 
with which he is identified are proud to number him in their membership. 
While born across the water, he is thoroughly American in spirit and interests 
and is an outstanding figure in the progressive upbuilding of city and state. 



HON. LEO KOCIALKOWSKT 

One of the most conspicuous and highly regarded democrats in the large 
Polish population of the city of Chicago is the Hon. Leo Kocialkowski, member 
of the House of Representatives from the Thirty-second Ward, portions of 
which are in the Congressional Districts Seven and Eight. Congressman Kocial- 
kowski 's success in the career of his choosing has been solely due to Ids own 
ability, his own individual efforts, courage and perseverance. He has been a 
most loyal adherent to the principles of the democratic party since his early 
childhood: he has given of the best within himself to foster those principles, 
and. in recent years, when he has attained the heights in political affairs, he 
has been a devoted servant to those people who are his constituents. He is 
loved by those whom he represents in the highest law-making body of the land 
and, in no instance, has there ever been justified criticism of his motives or 
activities. He is liberal to the utmost degree, sympathetic with those who have 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 47 

met with misfortune and hardship, and, having a keen understanding and 
appreciation of human nature, he is one well-equipped to combat the difficult 
situations which confront his people at this time in the country's history. 
Congressman Kocialkowski received his education in the school of life and 
experience, and it was a most comprehensive and thorough education, one 
which has enabled him to discharge the duties assigned to him with rare tact 
and judgment. 

Leo Kocialkowski was born in Chicago, Illinois, on the 16th of August, 
1882, and was one of three children born to his parents, the other two having 
been daughters. His parents died when he was an infant. His father, Michael 
Kocialkowski, was a native of Poland, while his mother was American born. 
Her father was the first organizer of the Wisconsin branch of the Polish 
National Alliance. 

Little education in the schools was available to Leo Kocialkowski when 
he was a young lad, but this did not discourage him. He worked with all the 
more vigor. When he was only twelve years of age, he sold newspapers on 
Chicago's north side, and in this stage of his life he first became an adherent 
of the democratic party, for he passed democratic campaign handbills out on 
the streets, and in many other ways moulded his future career in polities. He 
progressed, he made friends, he observed those things about him which were 
of benefit, and consequently he improved his own status in every particular. 
He became favorably known in political circles and eventually found employ- 
ment in the county treasurer's office, where he remained for sixteen years. 
He was a clerk and was tax appraiser, and he became very proficient in this 
last-mentioned department. For two years, he was chief deputy bailiff for 
Albert J. Horan, and he was chief auctioneer in delinquent taxes. Gradually, 
through the years, he arose in democratic prestige, and in 1928 was a delegate 
to the national convention in Houston, Texas. In 1930 he was a committeeman 
in his own ward, the thirty-second, and in the same year he was chosen at the 
polls for a seat in the United States House of Representatives, a most signal 
honor to him and one which he has justified in every particular. He w;is 
re-elected in 1934 to this dignified position by a large majority. 

In his first experience in the house, Congressman Kocialkowski acquitted 
himself with honor. He did not miss a roll call during the entire session, and 
was a member of the committees on insular affairs, revision of laws, and public 
buildings and grounds. He gave especial attention to relief bills which were 
introduced into the house, and gave his wholehearted support to the president 
in the Public Works Administration and the Civil Works Administration. The 
school board loan bill which was presented in Congress, he supported with 
enthusiasm, and for his efforts in its behalf was given recognition by the 
National Teachers Association, the National Educational Society, and the Illi- 
nois State Teachers Association, all of whom commended him for his work in 
behalf of this relief legislation. One does not have to look far into the record of 
this estimable representative of the people to realize that his future is to be 
one of real accomplishment in the ranks of the democratic party in Ellinois, for 
he represents the most modern and progressive principles which have placed 
the party in the forefront of American politics. 

Congressman Kocialkowski is a devout member of the Roman Catholic 
Church, belonging to St. Stanislaus parish. 



HON. RICHARD P. FARRELL 

For twelve years, Richard P. Farrell has rendered valuable service as 
county judge of Clinton county, THinnis, and for many years he has been con- 
sidered here as one of the most enthusiastic and willing workers in behalf of 
democracy. The judge is a native of Clinton county, born September 20, 
1870, and is a son of Richard and .Mary (Russell) Farrell, both of whom 
were born in Ireland. They came to the United States in the early '50s and 



18 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

first made settlemenl in Ohio, but in lS(j:5 came to Clinton county, Illinois, 
where the rather engaged in farming, lie was a democrat of the finest type. 

Richard P. Karrell received his education in the rural schools of Clinton 
county, then went to East St. Lotus to work, at the same time taking the 
opportunity to attend night schools for four years. He afterward returned 
in Clinton county and farmed until 1906, in which year he was elected sheriff 
for a four-year term. This completed, he again engaged in farming and live- 
stock raising until 1!)18, when his election as county treasurer brought him 
back to public service. He was the incumbent until 1922, when he was elected 
to his present position, that of county judge. His record on the bench has 
been marked by impartial conduct of the cases which have been brought before 
him. and he has used keen intelligence, understanding and fine tolerance in 
his decisions. His popularity has grown with each year of his tenure in office 
and his position becomes more secure. He is a democrat who has worked 
unceasingly for his party and he has attended many state conventions as a 
delegate, and also county, Congressional and judicial conventions. For several 
years he served as committeeman in his township, and he is a member of the 
Jeffersonian Club. He also belongs to the Illinois State County Judges Asso- 
ciation. 

Judge Parrell was married in 1889 to Miss Rose Stein, a daughter of 
Anton D. Stein, the latter a native of France who came to Illinois in 1850. 
Three children have been born to Judge and Mrs. Farrell, namely: Mary, 
who is the widow of Harry Reed of Carlyle ; Richard J., who is in the grocery 
business in Carlyle; and Ida, who passed away in 1918. 

Judge Farrell 's religious belief is that of the Roman Catholic Church 
and lie is a devout communicant of St. Mary's parish. He belongs also to the 
Knights of Columbus. 



ALBERT JAMES HORAN 

Albert James Horan, chief bailiff of the municipal courts of Chicago, with 
office on the eighth floor of the City Hall, has been successfully engaged in the 
real estate and insurance business since 1928. He operated under the firm name 
of A. J. Horan & Company until 1929, when the partnership was dissolved and 
he became a member of the firm of Horan & O'Brien. He was born December 
12, 1893, in Chicago, Illinois, where he has always lived, and is a son of Jerry 
and Mary (Nash) Horan. In the acquirement of an education he attended 
Our Lady of Sorrows grammar school, the St. Philip high school and also the 
Lewis Institute of Chicago. He first worked as an electrician from 1912 until 
1918, in which year he entered the military service of his country in the Air 
Corps of the American Expeditionary Force. Thereafter he became a salesman 
in the employ of the Simplex Electric Heating Company, with which he was 
thus connected from 1920 until 192.'!. Since the latter year, as above stated, 
he has devoted his attention to the real estate and insurance business in Chicago, 
maintaining offices at 134 North LaSalle street, and he has won gratifying and 
well merited success in this field of activity. Aside from his business affairs 
.Mr. Horan has manifested an enthusiastic interest in civic matters and from 
1923 until 1930 represented the twenty-ninth ward of Chicago as alderman. 
Elected bailiff of the municipal courts on the 4th of November, 1 !>:>(>. he has 
since discharged the duties devolving upon him in this capacity in a most effi- 
cient and highly acceptable manner. lie was a delegate from the sixth distrid 
in the democratic national convention in Chicago in 1932, and at this writing 
he is a member of the state housing board. 

On the 12th of June, 1923, Mr. Horan was united in marriage to Miss Rose 
McDermott, of Chicago. He has membership in the American Legion and fra- 
ternally is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, the Benevolenl and Protective Order of Elks and the Loyal Order of 
Moose. He is also a popular member of the Butterfield Country Club, the Logan 




ALBERT J. HORAN 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 51 

Square Athletic Club and the Circle Athletic Club, and he finds pleasurable 
recreation in golf, baseball and swimming. 



MAURICE F. KAVANAGH 

An outstanding figure among Chicago's democratic citizens is Maurice F. 
Kavanagh, who is one of the most successful business men of the city and one 
who has gained eminent position in political affairs, now being a member of the 
Cook County Board of Commissioners, which place in the administration he has 
held since 1922. 

Maurice F. Kavanagh was born in Coldwater, Michigan, on September 17, 
1868 and is a son of James and Mary (Reynolds) Kavanagh. He received his 
education in the Chicago public schools, but had no opportunity to enter college, 
so found his first regular employment in a railway express office. While clerk 
for the Adams express organization, he was sent to all parts of the country, in 
which work he gained a vast experience and equipped himself well for his future 
career. Finally, in 1888, his duties brought him to Chicago and, except for a 
short period which was spent in New Orleans, Louisiana, he has lived here ever 
since. Mr. Kavanagh eventually left the express business and started a restaurant 
and in this work he has made one of the most conspicuous successes in the Chicago 
business world. He has given rare judgment to the conduct of his work and, 
having a comprehensive idea of human nature, deserves full credit for his 
achievement. 

Mr. Kavanagh first entered politics in the old Eighteenth Ward and was 
elected alderman. This was the beginning of a political career to rival his business 
career. He was elected a member of the Cook county Board of Commissioners 
and has been an incumbent ever since. His duties in that body have been dis- 
charged to the full satisfaction of everyone concerned. 

Mr. Kavanagh is a member of the Knights of Columbus and is heartily 
interested in the cultural affairs of the city, being a life member of the Chicago 
Art Institute and the Field Museum. In every respect, he is a well-rounded, civic- 
spirited citizen of Chicago. 



HON. BERNARD J. KEWIN 

Hon. Bernard J. Kewin, state representative from the fifth senatorial 
district of Illinois and a well known resident of Chicago, is not only serving 
as one of the legislators but is also real estate agent for the Forest preserve 
district of Cook county. He has long exerted a widely felt influence over 
thought and action in democratic circles and his labors have been a most 
effective element in winning party successes. 

Born in Chicago, July 29, 1886, Mr. Kewin is a son of Anthony and Anna 
(Murphy) Kewin, who were natives of this city and were here married by 
the late Father Waldron, the beloved pastor of Old St. John's Church at 
Eighteenth and Clark streets. The father was associated with the wholesale 
dry-goods house of John V. Farwell for more than forty-two years. To him 
and his wife were born six children: Bernard J., Frank, Henry, Veronica, 
William and Mary. 

In the acquirement of his education Bernard J. Kewin attended St. Eliza- 
beth's parochial school and entered public life as a messenger in the city hall 
in 1905. His attention has since been given to public duties. Later lie became 
a clerk in charge of contagious disease reports and continued in that depart- 
ment until 1920. He was then appointed chief forester's clerk under the reign 
of Peter Reinberg, president of the county board. In 1925 he was appointed 
real estate agent for the Forest preserve district, which position he lias since 
filled, making a most creditable record by the prompt, faithful and efficienl 
performance of his duties. In 1932 he was elected state representative from the 
fifth senatorial district and was again nominated in the April, l!»:!4. primaries 
a district which is considered overwhelmingly republican but one in which he is 



, LU N01S LIBRARY 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

very popular, as is shown by his re-election on November (i, 1934. Mr. Kewin 
is the secretary and treasurer of the Fourth Ward Regular Democratic Or- 
ganization. During the fifty-eighth general assembly he was a member of the 
committees on banks and hanking:, building- and loan associations, charities and 
corrections, congressional apportionment, education, insurance, judicial appor- 
tionment and waterways. His committee work was thorough and the results of 
his labors were highly satisfactory to his constituents. 

On the 25th of June, 1913, Mr. Kewin was muted in marriage to Miss 
Kstelle Mangan, daughter of .Michael and Mary Mangan, of Chicago. Mr. and 
Mrs. Kewin are the parents of a son, Bernard Mangan, born June 24. 1914. 
who is now a law student at De Paul University of Chicago as a member of the 
class of 1937. The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic Church 
and Mr. Kewin was formerly high chief ranger of the Catholic Order of 
Foresters. He has a wide acquaintance in Chicago, where his entire life has 
been passed and where lie lias a large circle of warm friends who highly com- 
mend his official record. 



.JOSEPH E. KNIGHT 



Joseph E. Knight, senatorial committeeman and assistant state commerce 
commissioner, makes his home near Dow, in Jersey county. He was horn on a farm 
near Dow where the Knight family still live, his parents being Walter E. and 
Helen (Reed) Knight, the latter a native of Burden, Kansas. Walter E. Knight 
was born on the same farm where the birth of his son Joseph occurred and was a 
son of .Joseph Knight, who was born in Alton, Hampshire, England. The grand- 
father served in Queen Victoria's private regiment under his cousin, Sir Godfrey 
Knight, and came to America about 1863. lie wedded Margaret E. MeDow, who 
was born at Dow, Jersey county, Illinois, a daughter of John and Maria ( Wagner) 
MeDow. Her father was a son of John and Margaret (Gillham) McDow and 
a representative of one of the oldest of the pioneer families of Jersey county, 
the McDows settling on the farm where Joseph E. Knight and his parents now 
live on the 3d of August, 1824, since which time the property has been in posses- 
sion of their descendants. John McDow, the father of Margaret E. (McDow) 
Knight, died in the gold rush of 1849. Walter E. Knight, the father of Joseph 
E. Knight, has always followed the occupation of farming, which he carries on 
extensively in Jersey county. He is also interested in land and investments and 
he has been a member of the board of supervisors for the past five years. He takes 
an active interest in everything pertaining to the welfare and progress of the 
community and is a most public-spirited citizen. 

Joseph E. Knight attended the Salem district school and afterward entered 
the Jersey township high school, from which he was graduated with the class 
of 1929. He next matriculated in Illinois College at Jacksonville, where he re- 
mained as a student for three years, and he belonged to the Sigma Pi, of which 
fraternity William Jennings Bryan was also a member. .Mr. Knight has always 
been active in democratic affairs, even before he attained the age of twenty-one. 
and he was elected senatorial committeeman in April. 1934, by the largest majority 
given any senatorial committeeman in this district. He has attended the state and 
national conventions since old enough to vote and has been very active as a 
campaign speaker in central Illinois. On the 8th of June, 1934. he was appointed 
assistant state commerce commissioner, with offices in Springfield and Chicago. 
He makes politics and the interests of the democratic party his chief activity in 
life. Mr. Knight is a man of hue physique and pleasing personality, genial, 
courteous and of cordial disposition, and he makes friends wherever he goes. 

GEORGE SEIF 

George Seif, trustee of the sanitary district of Chicago and a former clerk 
of the criminal court, was born in Streator, La Salle county, Illinois, November 
24, 1874. His education was acquired in the grade and high schools of that 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 53 

city and he early began to provide for his own support, selling newspapers 
while attending school. When his textbooks were put aside he became a sub 
mail carrier in Streator, working in that connection for a year and a half. 
Through the two succeeding years he was employed as a miner in the zinc 
mines of Joplin, Missouri, after which he came to Chicago, where he obtained 
employment in the wholesale grocery house of Sprague, Warner & Company, 
resigning that position to accept an appointment as assistant fire chief at 
Streator. His service in that connection continued until 1905, when he resigned 
as a member of the Streator fire department and again came to Chicago. 

Mr. Seif was appointed by the late James H. Eckels, receiver for the 
Chicago Union Traction Company, to a position in the law department of that 
company and there he remained for six years, rendering a most valuable service. 
Tn 1911 Mayor Carter H. Harrison (II) appointed him chief investigator in 
the office of the city attorney and in 1915 he received from the late Louis G. 
Stevenson, secretary of state, an appointment to the position of state examiner 
of chauffeurs in Chicago, in which capacity he served until 1917. During the 
World war he was paymaster for a contracting company at the Great Lakes 
Naval Training Station. 

Mr. Seif has always voted with the democratic party and in 1923 was 
elected alderman of what was then the thirty-fifth but is now the thirty-fourth 
ward. Reelection continued him in the office for four terms or eight years, 
during which he gave thoughtful consideration to the important questions 
which came up for settlement before this body of municipal lawmakers. While 
in the council he acted as a member of the following committees : finance ; local 
transportation ; gas, oil and electric light ; railway terminals ; and judiciary 
and special assessments. He was one of the members who fought for six weeks 
to keep the 1930 appropriations within the estimated revenues. In his alder- 
manic campaigns he was generally supported by the press, the Municipal Voters 
League and other civic organizations. 

In 1929 Mr. Seif was elected clerk of the criminal court of Cook county 
and in which connection the Crime Commission in its annual report, issued 
Jaunary 18, 1934, had the following to say: "George Seif, clerk of the criminal 
court, has conducted that office in a highly efficient manner." Not only his 
party but the general public has strongly endorsed his official record, which 
constitutes an important chapter in the annals of Chicago. Mr. Seif was elected 
to the office of trustee of the sanitary district of Chicago on November 6, 1934 
by a large majority. 

Mr. Seif is married and resides at 1628 Humboldt boulevard in Chicago. 
He is a member of Vega Lodge No. 1083, A. F. & A. M. ; Northwest Chapter 
No. 224, R. A. M. ; Goethe Lodge No. 8, Knights of Pythias ; the German Club 
of Chicago ; the Civil Legion ; and the Izaak Walton League of America, the 
last named indicating something of the nature of his preferred recreation. 
His outstanding characteristics not only make for good citizenship and efficient 
public service but also for warm friendships. 



WILLIAM J. McGAH 



William J. McGah, who is filling the office of master in chancery and who 
for a number of years has successfully engaged in the practice of Law, winning 
an enviable position at the Chicago bar, was born in this city on the 19th of 
January, 1892. His parents, Patrick and Bridget (Lyons) McGah, were both 
born in Ireland. He pursued his early education in the St. Pins grade school 
and afterward attended St. Ignatius College, from which lie was graduated 
with the class of 1910. He studied law at Loyola University and lie graduated 
with an LL. B. degree in 1913, and in the same year he was admitted to the 
Illinois bar. During the time lie was studying law, he was an examiner for the 
Chicago Civil Service Commission and for a time taughl Commercial haw and 
English on the Burr high school of Chicago. lie commenced the active practice 



54 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

of law in 1915 and in 1!>17 he enlisted I'm- service in the World war, as a private 
with the Headquarters Company of the Three Hundred and Fifty-sixth Brigade 
at Camp Jackson, South Carolina. Later he was transferred to Camp Sevier, 
South Carolina and was promoted to second lieutenant of infantry and was 
mustered out of service in December, 1918. 

.Mr. McGab then resumed the practice of law in Chicago and soon gained 
a liberal clientage whereby he has been connected with much important litigation. 
lie is always loyal to the highest standards of the profession and closely follows 
its ethics In December, 1932, he formed a partnership with Elmer J. Whitty, 
under the firm name of Whitty & McGah, and they maintain offices at 77 West 
Washington street in general law practice. In December, 1933, Mr. McGah was 
appointed Master in Chancery by Judge Donald McKinley of the Superior 
Court and is now filling that position. He is also attorney for the Park Em- 
ployes Annuity & Benefit Fund. lie is a member of the Illinois State Bar 
Association and he enjoys the full confidence ami high esteem of his fellow 
practitioners. 

In 1918 Mr. McGah was united in marriage to Ivatherine Conlin and they 
are the parents of three sons, Joseph, William J., and Edward, who are twelve, 
ten and eight years of age, respectively, and are all attending school. Mr. McGah 
is a Catholic and belongs to Charles Carroll Council of the Knights of Columbus. 
He also has membership in the Ulackhawk Post of the American Legion, the 
Butterfield Country Club, the Braeburn Golf & Country Club and the Iroquois 
Club. He resides in Oak Park and has been very active in Democratic circles, 
both in Oak Park and in Chicago. He has a host of warm friends wherever he 
is known and as the circle of his acquaintance broadens the number of his 
friends constantly increases. 



HARRY H. MASOX 



Prominent in the ranks of Illinois Democracy is Harry 11. Mason, of Sanga- 
mon county, who was elected as a representative in Congress on November (i. 
1934. He has been active in the democratic party for almost a third of a century, 
has wielded a very wide influence as a party worker, as county treasurer, and 
as a journalist — an influence that has always been on the side of progress and 
constructive effort. Mr. Mason has convincingly proved his worth in public 
office and his victory at the polls in November, 1934 was well-merited, also 
was indicative of the confidence reposed in him by the citizens of his Twenty- 
first Congressional District, which is composed of the counties of Sangamon. 
Christian. Macoupin and Montgomery. 

Harry II. Mason was born in McLean county, Illinois, December 16, 187.'5. 
and is a son of James A. and Lovenia F. (McCollister) Mason, natives of Massa- 
chusetts and Ohio respectively. When Mr. Mason was a small lad, his parents 
moved to Tazewell county, Illinois, where he grew to manhood in the city of 
Delavan. James A. Mason became prominent in that county as a grain buyer 
and farmer, and was very active in democratic circles. For a half century he 
was a leader in political affairs there, and filled various township and school 
offices, also was deputy sheriff. 

In the public schools of Tazewell county Harry II. Mason received his edu- 
cation, and as a young man became interested in newspaper work. For more 
than eleven years he was associated with the Delavan Advertiser, his experience 
there having been in both the editorial and mechanical departments. Tn 190)?. 
backed by his thorough training and experience, he bought the Pawnee Herald. 
which he edited and published with outstanding success until he entered public 
life. He t hen relinquished the management of the paper to other hands, although 
he still retains the ownership. The Herald is conducted as an independent news- 
paper. For a long period, Mr. Mason has been an active member of the Central 
Illinois Press Association and for eight years was president. 

Since he was eighteen years of age Mr. Mason has been active in the demo- 





* l 


■K^l 


^ «il 


j \ 




^*I^L 





HARRY II. MASON 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 57 

cratic party. He has represented his precinct on the Sangamon County Demo- 
cratic Central Committee since 1912 and was secretary of the same from 1932 
until 1934. For thirty-one years he has attended every state convention of his 
party as a delegate, and has also been a delegate to district conventions. In 
1932, the Hon. J. Earl Major, democratic Congressman, appointed Mr. Mason 
as his private secretary, which position he filled until Congressman Major 
resigned to become judge of the United States Court for the Southern District 
of Illinois. In this capacity he attained considerable experience in Congress, 
having attended all of the sessions of the Seventy-second Congress. Much actual 
Congressional work came to him, such as handling claims and other matters 
for the citizens of his district. One of the chief tasks which he had was assisting 
World war veterans, also veterans of other wars, with the many details in con- 
nection with the clearing up of their pension and compensation applications. 
In his campaign for the seat in Congress, Mr. Mason outlined definitely the 
methods by. which he intends to aid the veteran in Congress, methods which 
he has evolved through his long and thorough experience in taking care of 
such cases in Washington. 

Soon after he ceased being secretary to Congressman Major, Mi-. Mason 
was selected by the Sangamon County Board of Supervisors to fill the position 
of county treasurer, a vacancy having been caused in this office by the death 
of Charles L. Koehn. In this responsible position, Mr. Mason made many im- 
provements in the business methods of this branch of the county government. 
Principal among them was his extension of time to the taxpayers of the county, 
which meant no additional expense, but which brought in over three hundred 
thousand dollars in 1933 than would have been received otherwise. Ninety-four 
and seven-tenths percent of the taxes were collected in that year, a record 
reflecting most creditably on Mr. Mason's conduct of the office business. The 
county, in this respect, ranked first among the one hundred and two counties 
of the state, and the record is particularly good when one considers it was made 
during the time of intense financial stress in the county, state and nation. 
During the winter months of 1933-34, the democratic leaders cast about for the 
proper man to nominate for Congress from the Twenty-first District. Mr. 
Mason's proved ability in public office and his experience were just two of 
the factors which brought victory to him at the primary polls and on April 
10, 1934 his majority over his three opponents was very substantial. Then, on 
November 6, 1934, he was again victorious over his republican opponent. Mr. 
Mason is an arden believer in the Roosevelt policies of government and joins 
those members of Congress who are faithful to the administration. In unity 
there is strength, is the motto in which he abides. 

On August 17, 1912 occurred the marriage of Harry II. Mason and Miss 
Mabel Pennoyer of Springfield, and they now maintain their home in Pawnee. 
Like her husband, Mrs. Mason is a stanch democrat and is a member of the 
Sangamon County Women's Democratic Club. In Red Cross work she has also 
taken a leading part, and in various women's clubs and church societies she 
has been a foremost figure. She is one of those loyal women of Illinois who have 
done so much in their zeal for the success of democracy, and who have helped 
immeasureably in the success of the party during the last two years. 

Mr. Mason is a member of the Presbyterian Church. He has been for 
about fifteen years an ordained ruling elder, while in 1922 he represented 
Springfield Presbytery as commissioner to the general assembly, an interna- 
tional conclave held in Indianapolis, Indiana. Mrs. Mason is affiliated with 
the Episcopal Church. For four years, Mr. Mason was president of the board 
of education in Pawnee, and everything that has to do with the civic welfare 
or substantial advancement of the community finds in him a supporter. He 
was one of the organizers of the Roosevelt-Horner Club in Sangamon county, 
and he holds membership in the Springfield Optimist Club and the 1873 Club 
of Springfield. 1 1 is allegiance to any cause which he espouses is never questioned 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

and his party has indicated its faith in his ability and fidelity by sending him 
to the national Congress of tin- United States. 



RALPH W. O'FARRELL 

Ralph W. O'Farrell has made valuable contribution to the work of demo- 
cracy in Illinois. It was he who formed the Young Democrats organization 
in tin- stair and secured its charter, becoming the firsl state chairman, an office 
which he still 1ml i Is. Making Ins home in Chicago, he is a member of the regular 
democratic organization of the forty-fourth ward. 

Mr. O'Farrell was born in Quincy, Illinois, January 16, 1905, his parents 
being William and Bertha O'Farrell, both of whom were also natives of this 
state. The father was active in Quincy as a precinct captain and as judge of 
elect ions and always voted the democratic ticket. He died in Quincy in October, 
1928, and his widow still makes her home in that city. 

Ralph W. ( I'Farrel] at tended the Irving public school of Quincy. St Peter's 
parochial school and the Quincy high school and thus provided the foundation 
upon which to rear the superstructure of professional knowledge. He matricu- 
lated at the University of Illinois as a law student of the class of 1929 and won 
his LL. B. degree. While in the university he was very active in school politics. 
lie was admitted to the bar on the 13th of February, 1930, and has since en- 
gaged in law practice, in which he has made continuous and gratifying progress. 
He was formerly associated with the Chicago law firm of Kirk, Fleming, 
Graham & .Martin and is now a member of the equally well known and prom- 
inent law firm of Weinberg, Kjellander, O'Farrell & Ames, maintaining offices 
at :;t) .\orth Lacalle street in Chicago. 

Mr. O'Farrell is a Catholic in his religious connection. His political al- 
legiance has been given to the democratic party since he became a voter and 
he it was who formulated and executed the plan which resulted in the estab- 
lishment of the Young Democrats organization of Illinois, of which he was made 
the first state chairman, a position which he still fills. He is also president of 
the Young Democrats Clubs of Cook County and is an active member of the 
regular democratic organization of the forty-fourth ward. The state organiza- 
tnin has a membership of two hundred and fifty thousand and all credit is due 
Mr. O'Farrell. who has worked hard and long and whose labors have been most 
effective. The state society is a member of the national organization called 
the Young Democrats Clubs of America, of which James Roosevelt, the son of 
President Franklin I). Roosevelt, is the secretary. 



WALTER F. PAXKA 



Walter F. Panka, assistant chief deputy clerk of the municipal court in 
Chicago, is of European birth but was brought by his parents to the United 
States when about two years of age. lie has since lived in Chicago and is thor- 
oughly identified with the interests of the city, having participated in many 
projects for the general good. He was educated in the parochial and high schools 
of Chicago and in St. Cyril's College, from which he was graduated with the 
Bachelor of Arts degree in 1910. The same year he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Law from the Chicago-Kent College of Law and was admitted to 
the bar. He then became associated with Sidney S. Gorham, an attorney, who 
was the father of the Illinois state automobile law, and with Amos Miller, a well 
known attorney of Chicago, who was a partner in the firm. From 1914 until 
1920 he served as clerk under Julius Smietanka, then collector of internal 
revenue. Chicago experienced a land boom in 1921, at which time Mr. Panka 
entered the real estate business as an authority on real estate law. He lived 
in the twelfth ward and in 1930 he became secretary to Frank Zintak. with 
whom he acted as contact man. buffer and publicity writer, having charge of the 
Polish-American democratic headquarters of Conk county during the presiden- 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 59 

tial election of 1932. When Mr. Zintak became clerk of the supreme court, Mr. 
Panka continued as his aid and lieutenant. In February, 1934, Mr. Panka be- 
came assistant chief deputy under Joseph Gill, clerk of the municipal court, and 
in this connection he has charge of all criminal records and heads the criminal 
department. He is one of the best known workers among the Polish democrats 
of Chicago and wields a wide influence among those of Polish birth or lineage. 

Mr. Panka was married to Miss Mae C. Zamorski, of Chicago, whose father 
was one of the early settlers here, having come to this city in his childhood, as 
did her mother. Mr. and Mrs. Panka are of the Catholic faith and he belongs 
to the Knights of Columbus. He also has membership in the Iroquois Club, 
perhaps the most outstanding democratic social organization of the city, and his 
name is on the membership rods of the Chicago Society, the Polish Alma Mater 
and the Polish Falcons. He is national chairman of the Polish Singers Alliance 
of America, with a chorus of seventeen hundred, winch participated in enter- 
taining the thousands and thousands of spectators who were present at Soldiers 
Field on the lake front. Mr. Panka has always been a student of history and 
possesses a library of fourteen hundred volumes. Moreover, he is the author 
of The chapter in "Illinois Democracy" that gives the history of the Polish- 
American democrats of Chicago. His scholarly attainments are well known. 
He has delved deep into many fields of learning and his knowledge is com- 
prehensive and exact. He is yet a young man and all who know him predict 
for him a brilliant future, knowing his talents, his ambition and his effective 
methods in the accomplishment of everything which he undertakes. 



JAMES W. RYAN 



•fames W. Ryan, who has made valuable contribution to the history of 
democracy in Illinois by his efficient work for the party, is now chief deputy 
in the office of the county clerk of Cook county. Born in Chicago on the 28th of 
March, 1884, he is one of a family of ten children whose parents were natives 
of Ireland. He acquired a public and parochial school education and started 
out in official circles as a clerk under Robert M. Sweitzer, who is still his chief. 
He thus entered the county clerk's office in December, 1910, and has here con- 
tinued, acting in various capacities and winning successive promotions until 1921, 
when he was made chief deputy in the office of the county clerk. He has since 
filled the position and his record is an unassailable one, having been character- 
ized by the utmost loyalty to duty and the faithful performance of every task 
required of him. 

While thus connected with the local official service, he has also held other 
office, having been elected a state representative from the thirteenth district in 
1914. Again his commendable record in office led to his re-election and he 
served for four consecutive terms or through 1921, leaving the impress of his 
individuality upon various important legislative measures. He introduced the 
original bill for Calumet Harbor and secured its passage tli rough the fifty- 
second general assembly. This was his own measure, and had its conditions 
been carried out, it would have made the Calumet district the greatest manu- 
facturing and shipping district of the midwest, but his vision and foresight were 
fifty years in advance of the times. Beginning in 1921, he has continuously 
served as committeeman of the seventh ward, and during the election of 1932 
the ward under his leadership cast twenty-seven thousand democratic votes 
against about fifteen thousand repiddican votes. This was a tremendous demo- 
cratic gain, and today the seventh is in the democratic column, attributable in 
large measure to Mr. Ryan's powers of organization and intelligent control. 

In 1917 Mr. Ryan was united in marriage to Miss Helen Lavelle, of Chicago, 
and they are the parents of three daughters: Mary Helen and Virginia, both 
students at St. Xavier Academy; and Patricia, who is a grade pupil in a paro- 
chial school. The family home is at 7233 Paxton avenue. Chicago. Mr. Rvan 



60 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

belongs to the Catholic Church and the Knights of Columbus. Fraternally he 
is affiliated with the Royal Arcanum and the Eagles, and he lias membership in 
the South Shore Country Club. He finds Ins recreation largely in fishing and 
he is popular among men who recognize Ins strong, manly qualities and ap- 
preciate Ins sterling worth. 

ALLEN THURMAN LUCAS 

Allen Thurman Lucas, Si-., an outstanding figure in Chandlerville and in 
fad widely known in his section of the state as an attorney, author, lecturer 
and political leader, was born January l!t, 1879, on a farm near the town in 
which he still resides, his parents being William and Sarah C. (Underbrink) 
Lucas, the former a native of Tennessee and the latter of Ohio. They became 
early settlers of Cass county, Illinois, where the father followed farming. Wil- 
liam Lucas served as justice of the peace, as township assessor, as mayor, and 
member of the Board of Education of Bath, Illinois, for many years, and was al- 
ways an active democrat. The ancestors of Allen T. Lucas on both sides were 
military men, the families being represented in the War of 1812, the Mexican 
war and the Civil war. 

Allen T. Lucas attended the country schools of Cass county, the Jackson- 
ville high school, Illinois College, the University of Illinois and the law depart- 
ment of Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington, being graduated from 
the last named in 1906 with the degree of LL. B. He entered upon the practice 
of his profession at Virginia, Illinois, but later removed to Chandlerville, where 
he has since resided, and as the years have passed he has been accorded a large 
and growing clientele that has connected him with much important litigation 
heard in the courts of the district, and he is now one of the outstanding crimi- 
nal lawyers of central Illinois. In 1908 he became state's attorney of Cass 
county and filled that office with distinction until 1916. Tn 1928 he became 
master in chancery, which position he continues to hold at the present time. 
He is also largely interested in farm lands in the Sangamon valley of Cass 
county and the immediate vicinity of Chandlerville. 

On the 5th of June, 1905, Mr. Lucas was married to Josephine Sarff, of 
Mason county, Illinois, and they have two children: Mrs. Fay Robertine Har- 
per, of Dayton, Ohio; and Allen Thurman, Jr., attending the Chandlerville 
high school. 

Mr. Lucas was formerly affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America and is now 7 identified with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. His religious faith is that of the 
Christian Church. In politics he has always been an active democrat and has 
served on various party committees. At the present writing he is mayor of 
Chandlerville, which office he has filled for several years, and he manifests a 
keen and helpful interest in everything pertaining to civic progress and ad- 
vancement. 

He was unanimously chosen chairman of the judicial convention which met 
in Quincy, Illinois, April 8, 1933, and in the last campaign he held several public 
debates on the farm question with men of national reputation, including Ex- 
Governor Harding of Iowa. His interest in debate has covered an extended 
period. When a freshman at the University of Illinois in 1904, he was a mem- 
ber of the team that debated against Indiana University, and was the only 
freshman at that time who had ever made the debating team of the University of 
Illinois. The question on that occasion was: "Resolved That the Changes in 
the Constitution of the Southern States, since 1889, by which the Negro Vote in 
such States has been Restricted are on the Whole to be Commended." Mr. 
Lucas opened and closed for the negative, and the debate was won by Illinois. 

Mr. Lucas is frequently heard upon many questions of vital interest affect- 
ing the public. His reading and study have covered a wide and comprehensive 




ALLEN T. LUCAS 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 63 



field and he speaks with authority upon many important questions and prob- 
lems, lie is the historian of the Lincoln National Memorial Highway Associa- 
tion, of which he was one of the organizers, and for which he wrote a prospectus 
of more than one hundred pages. He is now chairman of the routing committee 
and chairman of the legislative committee of said association. He frequently 
lectures on the life of Lincoln, having prepared four such lectures which are 
copyrighted. He is also the author of a book of poems entitled "Lays of a 
Country Lawyer," and lie wrote the play in drama form "Lincoln's Defense 
of Duff Armstrong," hecoming director of tins play, in which he has taken the 
part of "Fullerton" the prosecuting attorney. There is a cast of thirty-three 
characters made up of local people, and under his direction the play has been 
widely presented throughout the central west with great success. Mr. Lucas 
is the owner and proprietor of Panther Hills Resort and Stock Farm, between 
Chandlerville and Virginia. His interests and activities are indeed wide and 
varied, having- touched many fields of usefulness, while at the same time he 
has contributed much to the intellectual and cultural development of his 
community. 



CHESTER W. KUBACKI 

Chester W. Kubacki, chief clerk in the office of county recorder of Cook 
county, is a native of Poland, whence he was brought to the United States in 
March, 1898, by his parents, who settled in Chicago. Here he attended the 
public schools and also Watson's Business College, and he obtained his first 
commercial job with Armour & Company, working in the yards for six months. 
He then entered the employ of the Pullman Company at Pullman. Illinois, 
serving as a clerk in the cabinet, wood mill and paint departments. He acted 
as timekeeper and bought all materials for these three departments, his position 
being one of large responsibility, as he had supervision over seven hundred 
men. After seven months he requested permission to enter the car shops in 
older to learn the practical side of car manufacturing. He worked in ^wvy 
line of manufacturing in the shops up to the time he reached the age of twenty- 
one years. It was about then that the United States entered the World war 
and he eidisted in the Third Division of the United States Regulars, becoming 
a member of the Seventy-sixth Field Artillery, with which he participated in 
six major operations in France. Patrick J. Hurley, afterward secretary of 
war under President Hoover, was a second lieutenant in his company and they 
still cherish and delight to recall their experiences. Mr. Kubacki was mustered 
out in September, 1919. 

His public activities cover the period dating from 1922, in which year a 
new department was created in Chicago now known as the license investigation 
department. As a clerk in the city collector's office he supervised the system 
of files and accounting for the new department. In 1924 Mr. Kubacki was a 
candidate for the state legislature in the thirteenth senatorial district and polled 
more than thirteen thousand, five hundred votes, but it was a year of republican 
victories. It was also in that year that he entered the real estate business, 
in which he continued actively until 1928. In the latter year he was associated 
with M. S. Szymczak, then the superintendent of the Forest Preserve district. 
Later he received an appointment as chief clerk in the City Garage and subse- 
quently was advanced to the position of minute clerk in the superior court, 
where he continued until December 1."), 1932. The following day he was ap- 
pointed chief clerk under Clayton F. Smith, county recorder of Cook county, 
and in this position yet continues. It will thus be seen that his record is one 
of consecutive promotions and advancement, as he has displayed thorough 
qualifications for the offices that he has filled and has therefore been called to 
higher levels of political service. Mr. Kubacki has been captain of the fifty- 
fifth precinct of the ninth ward, which is one of the four best precincts in 
Chicago and which in the April primary of 1934 showed a vote of four hundred 



04 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

and twenty-six democrats and twenty-three republicans. Since 1925 he has 
been president of the Polish-American Democratic Club and is a greal favorite 
with iiis people. 

Mr. Kubacki is married and lias two children, Virginia and Chester, Jr., 
aged respectively twelve and eleven years. In religious belief lie is a Catholic. 
He loves all outdoor sports such as serve to build up health and strength in the 
youth of America and is much interested particularly in baseball and football. 
A young man of ability, combined with energy and determination, there is no 
doubt as to the future before him. 



HON. JOHN MARTIN BOLTON 

Cor three successive terms Hon. John Martin Bolton has been elected to 
the state legislature from the second senatorial district and he has the dis- 
tinction of being one of the youngest members of the general assembly. Thai 
he has shown marked ability and fitness for the office is manifest in the fact 
that he has been elected on three different occasions. 

Horn in Chicago, October 26, 1907, John M. Bolton is a son of Michael and 
Nellie (Mahoney) Bolton, both of whom are natives of Ireland. The father, 
who was born February 29, 1845, has now reached the venerable age of eighty- 
nine years. The family has always given stalwart support to the democratic 
party and Michael Bolton was for fifty-three years employed as a steamfitter 
by Cook county but is now living retired, enjoying a rest which he has truly 
earned and richly deserves. 

John M. Bolton attended the public schools of Chicago and afterward be- 
came ;i pupil in St. Patrick's Commercial Academy of this city, being graduated 
therefrom with the class of 1926. After leaving school he served as a clerk in 
the offices of Logan & Bryan, well known Board of Trade firm, for two years. He 
then engaged in the florist business for four years, since which time he has 
given his attention to his official duties. 

On the 11th of July, 1928, in Chicago, Mr. Bolton was united in marriage 
to Marie Fanelli. They are members of the Catholic Church. Since casting 
has first presidential vote Mr. Bolton has never wavered in his allegiance to 
the democratic party and is a member of the regular democratic organization of 
the twenty-seventh ward. He served as precinct captain of the eighth prec.net 
in the twenty-sixth ward, and in 1930 he was elected to represent his district 
in the state legislature, where he made a record for efficiency that led to his 
reelection in 1932, and in 1934 the second senatorial district for the third time 
chose him to act in the general assembly. He is a very young legislator, being 
now but twenty-seven years of age, and starting upon his third term he shows 
much promise of going far. Those who know him do not hesitate to prophesy 
for him steady progress and a successful future. His name is associated with 
much importanl legislation enacted during the last three terms of the general 
assembly and he stanehly adheres to all party measures. 



SIDNEY T. IIOLZMAN 

It is said that every man has a hobby, and in the case of Sidney T. Holzman 
it is well known that his hobby is hard work- in connection with the discharge 
of the duties of his position as secretary to Judge Edmund K .Jarecki. Loyalty 
has ever been one of his outstanding characteristics and he has never feared 
that close application which enables industry to conquer all difficulties and 
obstacles in its path. 

He was born in Chicago, December 23, 1898, a son of Louis and Nettie 
(Pollock) Holzman. The father came to Illinois in 1870, and in the grammar 
schools of Chicago his son Sidnev pursued his education, supplemented by two 
years of study in high school. He started out in the business world as an em- 
ploye of the Continental Commercial National Bank of Chicago in 1914. when 
;i voulh of about sixteen years, and was there employed until 1922, with the 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 65 

exception of a period of three years devoted to military service, from 1917 until 
1920, as a member of the machine gun company of the One Hundred and 
Thirty-second Infantry. He was in Prance from the 16th of April, 1918, until 
the 16th of April, 1919, and his military record is indicated by the fact that he 
is the possessor of a Distinguished Service Cross presented to him by General 
John J. Pershing. 

On leaving the bank in 1922, Mr. Holzman became a clerk of the board of 
election commissioners and did systematic and efficient service in that capacity 
until appointed secretary to Judge Jarecki in 1928. lie has since filled this 
position, covering a period of six years, and he is in full sympathy with the high 
standards and ideals of service for which his superior has ever stood. His 
duties in this position are his first consideration and his close application, in- 
telligently directed has brought far-reaching and beneficial results. 

In 1925 Mr. Holzman was united in marriage to Agnes Katherine Furlong, 
of Chicago, and they are the parents of two children, James Chester and Mary 
Lou Cavell. 

Mr. Holzman is prominent among those who have seen military service. He 
belongs to the American Legion, is a past post commander and has served as 
state officer. He likewise has membership in La Societe Des Quarante Homines 
Et Huit Chevaux, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Disabled American War 
Veterans, the Combat Medal Men's Association, of which he is a past president, 
the Thirty-third Division War Veterans Association and the United States In- 
fantry Association. He likewise belongs to the Post Commanders Club of the 
American Legion. In politics he has always been a democrat and is a member 
of the Eighth Ward Organization. In civic as in military life he has held to 
high standards of citizenship and his unfaltering allegiance to his honest con- 
victions is one of the salient forces of his character. 



AUGUST G. URBANSKI 

During the course of many years one of the most consistent and loyal sup- 
porters of the democratic party in Chicago has been Judge August G. Urbanski, 
who now holds the position of assistant probate judge of Cook county. He has 
been active in a number of political organizations, and is now a member of the 
Thirty-fourth Ward Democratic Committee. 

August G. Urbanski is a native son of Chicago, his birth having occurred 
in this city on August 15, 1883, and he is a son of Otto and Mary (John) Urbanski. 
The father was born in southern Illinois and met his death by accident over fifty 
years ago, when August G. was a small child. The mother, who was born in 
Poland, was brought to the United States by her parents when she was seven 
years of age, and is yet living. 

Judge Urbanski attended the public schools of Chicago and received his 
legal education at the John Marshall Law School in this same city. He was a 
student in this institution from 1906 until 1909 and received his Bachelor of 
Laws degree in the latter year. He was admitted to the bar in 1912. During his 
school course, the judge was employed. He worked in the office of the Cook 
county sheriff, Tom Barrett, and in 1906 was drafted by Thomas M. Hunter, 
bailiff of the Municipal Court as return clerk. He perfected a system of con- 
ducting the detailed work of this office which has been used since his incumbency 
and is a most efficient idea. From 1909 until 1912, Judge Urbanski was manager 
of the real estate department of the Northwestern Trust and Savings Bank, and 
in this work acquired much experience and training which has been of inestimable 
value to him in subsequent years. In 1912, he took up actual practice of law. and 
made a specialty of chancery, real estate and probate litigation, phases of the law 
in which he is now generally considered an authority. Judge Qrbanski was a 
candidate for the municipal court in 1932, but was not elected, then in January, 
1933, he was appointed to his present position, assistant probate judge, in which 



66 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

responsible post lie has given the utmost satisfaction to all concerned, lie is a 
member of the American, the Illinois State, and the Chicago bar associations. 

< >n the 8th of •Line, 1910, Judge Qrbanski was united in marriage to .Miss 
Helen J. Jenderzek of Chicago, and they have become the parents of four children, 
namely : August G., Jr. ; Beatrice; Loretta ; and Gladianna. The family residence 
is situated at 2556 Kedzie Boulevard. 

During the World war period, the judge was a member of the Bed Cross 
and was an active participant in all local drives and movements for the cause. 
He belongs to the Logan Square Athletic Club, the Kiwanis Club, the Benevolent 
Protective I >rder of Elks, the Loyal Order of Moose, and the Knights of Columbus. 
Fishing is his favorite diversion, and he is a member of the Izaak Walton League. 



W. EMERY LANCASTER 

VY. Emery Lancaster, attorney at law in Quincy and chairman of the Illinois 
State Civil Service Commission, was born in Adams county, .Line 17, 1876. his 
parents being William and [sabelle (Prather) Lancaster, who were also natives 
of Adams county, Illinois. The father, who was born in 1833, was a farmer 
of Houston township, Adams county, and was well known as a stanch supporter 
of the democratic party. Botli he and his wife have passed away. 

W. Emery Lancaster attended the rural schools of his native county and 
tin' high schools of La Prairie and Golden, Illinois. He also spent a year as a 
student in the Western Normal School at Bushnell and for four years studied 
in Knox College at Galesburg, winning his Bachelor of Science degree at his 
graduation in 1899. He then spent three years in the University of Michigan, 
receiving the LL. B. degree in 1902 on completing the regular law course. 
Admitted to the Illinois bar, he began practice in Quincy in 1903 and has since 
followed his profession in this city. He has made steady progress through his 
splendid work in the courts and the thoroughness and care with which he pre- 
pares his cases constitutes a basic foundation for his success. He was the de- 
fender of Kay Pfanschmidt, who was charged with the murder of four people. 
On first trial the accused man was found guilty and appealed to the supreme 
court, which reversed the decision. A change of venue was taken to Macomb, 
where he was acquitted. Brought to trial on another count, he was again found 
guilty and the supreme court again reversed the decision. This time a change 
of venue was taken to Princeton, Illinois, where he was acquitted. This case won 
wide comment, as it was the first case in Illinois where bloodhound testimony 
was refused admission. Aside from his professional activities Mr. Lancaster 
is identified with business interests as vice president and director of the Illinois 
Stock Medicine Company, a director of the Lincoln Douglas Hotel of Quincy 
and a director of the Ilalbach & Schroeder Company. In fact he is closely con- 
nected with many public interests and is now president of the Quincy Memorial 
Bridge, while since the organization was formed to promote the bridge he has 
served as a director. He was the originator of the plan thus to span the river 
and worked upon the project for five years to <ret it started. Whatever tends 
to promote the public welfare receives his endorsement and support and his 
humanitarian spirit is indicated in the fact that he is a member of the board of 
the Woodland Home and also of the board of the Blessing Hospital. 

On the 20th of October, 1906, Mr. Lancaster was united in marriage to 
Miss Edith Ilalbach and they are the parents of a daughter, Virginia, who 
is the wife of R. L. Pierson. of Quincy, Illinois. There are also two grand- 
children : Emery Lancaster Pierson, aged four, and Diana, two years of age. 

The social nature of Mr. Lancaster finds expression in his membership in 
the Quincy Country Club, of which he was formerly president, and he is like- 
wise a past president of the Quincy Rotary Club. He is also a past president 
of the Chamber of Commerce of Quincy and was formerly a member of the 
executive committee. He is president and a director of the Radio Station WTAD 
of the Illinois Broadcasting Company. His political activity has covered a 




W. EMEKY LANCASTER 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 69 

wide scope. He served for many years on the Adams county committee and was 
its chairman for two terms. He was the democratic nominee for congress at one 
time but was defeated in the general election. He has attended five of the 
national conventions of the democratic party, having been a delegate to New 
York in 1924, to Houston in 1928 and to Chicago in 1932. He was also a visitor 
to the Denver convention of 1908 and to the St. Louis convention of 1916. In 
March, 1933, he was appointed chairman of the Illinois State Civil Service Com- 
mission by Governor Horner and is now acting in that capacity. He is a man 
of pleasing personality, of marked alertness and enterprise and of broad vision, 
and he labors along lines productive of results, whether in the professional, the 
business or the political field. 



THOMAS JAMES LYNCH 

Thomas James Lynch, of Chicago, has for thirteen years served as judge 
of the circuit court and his name finds prominent place in the judicial history 
of Illinois. Since entering upon the active practice of law his progress has 
been continuous and he is today accounted one of the foremost members of the 
Cook county bar. Born in Chicago on the 22d of July, 1879, he is a son of 
Martin and Winifred (McGinty) Lynch, both of whom were natives of Ireland. 
The year 1865 witnessed the arrival of Martin Lynch in the United States, and 
traveling westward across the country, he settled in Chicago, where he served 
in the customs house under appointment of President Cleveland. He was a 
lifelong democrat and gave unfaltering allegiance to the party and its prin- 
ciples. He and his wife became parents of four children, all born in Chicago. 

Thomas J. Lynch acquired his education in his native city, attending St. 
Ignatius College, in which he pursued the high school course as a member of 
the class of 1900. Having determined to engage in the practice of law as a 
life work, he entered the Chicago Law School with the class of 1905 and at his 
graduation received the LL. B. degree, being admitted to the bar the same 
year. He at once entered upon the general practice of law, which he followed 
independently for sixteen years, advancing step by step as he gave tangible 
proof of his ability to cope with the intricate and involved problems that came 
before the courts. Recognition of his powers as an attorney and indication of 
his fairness and impartiality led to his election to the circuit court bench of 
Cook county in 1921 and through the intervening period to the present time he 
has served as a judge of this court. He acted as chief justice of the criminal 
court in 1926 and his entire judicial record is one which reflects credit upon 
the history of the bench and bar of Illinois. 

Politically Judge Lynch has been a lifelong democrat since casting his 
first vote. He served as precinct captain of No. 8 precinct from 1902 until PUS 
and was always an active party worker until called to the judicial service. Tin 
thirtieth ward of Chicago four times elected him to the city council, of which 
he was a member from 1914 until 1921, and while serving in that connection 
he acted as chairman of the gas, oil and electric light committee and also on 
the police, fire, schools and civil service committees. He did important work 
in shaping municipal affairs Avhile a member of the council. In 1919 he became 
ward committeeman of the thirtieth ward and so continued until 1923. He has 
attended all of the state conventions of the democratic party since 1902 and 
the national convention held in Chicago in 1932, being also sent as a delegate to 
the democratic national convention in St. Louis in 1916. 

On the 30th of June, 1920, Judge Lynch was married to Miss Genevieve 
McUrath, a daughter of Maurice McGrath, who was a grocer of Chicago, where 
he established business in 1893. .Judge Lynch is a third degree member of 
the Knights of Columbus and a communicant of St. Mel's Catholic Church of 
Chicago. He became one of the organizers and charter members of Garfield 
Aerie No. 1113 of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, of which he is now past 
worthy president, having served for two terms as chief presiding officer. He 



To ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

also belongs to the Order of Foresters, of which be was chief ranger Irom 
1902 until L908. He is a member of the Butterfield Country Club and of the 
City Club and finds expression for his social nature in the contacts of these 
organizations. 



HOMER JACKSON BYRD 

Homer Jackson Byrd, county commissioner of Cook county, has received 
the endorsement of his party in a second nomination for the office which he tills. 
His life story is an interesting one by reason of the progressive spirit which he 
has always manifested and the valuable work which he has accomplished in the 
educational as well as the political field. -Mr. Byrd was born in Bluffton, Indiana, 
January 23, 1898, a son of Andrew Jackson and .Jane (Bowman) Byrd. After 
attending the Bluffton high school he continued his education in the .Marion 
Normal Institute, the Indiana State Normal School at Muncie and the Chicago- 
Kent College of Law. He has devoted much of his life to educational work, serving 
as a teacher and afterward as principal and then as assistant county superin- 
tendent of schools for Cook county. He has also had business interests as a 
dairyman and as an aeroplane manufacturer, and he is not unknown in the 
field of authorship, having prepared and published several educational works. 

Mr. Byrd makes his home at Arlington Heights, where he was elected and for 
two terms served as magistrate. He was also elected village trustee and occupied 
the office for one term. In 1930 he was nominated on the democratic ticket for 
county commissioner of Cook county and was elected, so that he has been the 
incumbent in the office for about four years, being renominated in 1934. lie has 
never wavered in his allegiance to the democratic party and in December, 1933, 
was elected presidenl of the Illinois Young People's Democratic Clubs, a position 
which he ably fills, as he displays much wisdom in directing the activities of this 
statewide organization. 

On the 4th of dune, 1933, Mr. Byrd was married to Leonora Grethe, and they 
reside at 301 Belmont avenue, Arlington Heights. Mr. Byrd is a member of the 
Phi Alpha law fraternity, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
Masonic fraternity and Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is a member 
and past president of the Lions Club of Arlington Heights and is a pilot and 
a member of aviation clubs, finding his chief recreation in flying. It is character- 
istic of -Mr. Byrd that he never stops short of the successful accomplishment of 
his purpose and that determination and energy carry him steadily forward. 
His life has been one of usefulness and no one needs hesitate to prophesy success 
for him in the future, no matter into what field he may direct his efforts. 



JAMBS II. MURPHY 

James II. Murphy, attorney at law of Carlinville and chairman of the 
democratic central committee of Macoupin county, was born April 12, 1S77, at 
Carlinville, Illinois, a soti of Phillip Murphy, and Anna (McCabe) Murphy. 
He graduated from the Carlinville high school in 1896, taught school in Macoupin 
county for five years and afterward read law in the office of David E. Keefe, 
county judge at Carlinville. being admitted to the bar in 1902. He has con- 
tinuously engaged in the practice of law since that date, maintaining offices at 
Yirden, Illinois, where he resides, and at Carlinville. He is also president of 
The Farmers & Merchants State Bank of Yirden, Illinois, of which he has been 
a director for fifteen years, and vice president of The Yirden Grain Company, 
and displays excellent qualifications along those lines as well as in his profession. 

On the 14th of August, 1907, at Alton, Illinois, Mr. Murphy was united in 
marriage to Mary Florence Moffitl and they are the parents of two children. 
Lucile J. and James P. 

Mr. Murphy is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Fraternal Order 
of Eagles, the Modern Woodmen of America, the .Macoupin County Bar Asso- 
ciation and the Illinois State Bar Association. He belongs to St. Catherine's Cat ho- 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 71 

lie Church at Virden, Illinois, and has been a trustee of that church for more than 
twenty years. He lias always been a supporter of the democratic party and was 
a member of the Macoupin county democratic central committee for ten years, 
representing District Xo. 3 of Virden, and has been its chairman since April. 
1934. lie has served as a member of the executive committee of the party for 
ten years. He was a delegate from the twenty-first congressional district of Illinois 
to the national democratic convention at Houston, Texas, in 1928, has been a 
delegate to all state and judicial conventions for the past fifteen or twenty years 
and has taken part in every campaign for the past thirty-five years. Mr. Murphy 
has served as city attorney of Virden, Illinois, from 1905 to the present time. 
was state's attorney of Macoupin county from 1908 to 1916 and master in 
chancery of .Macoupin county from 1930 to 1932. He has been a trustee of the 
Virden Public Library for the past six years and has been a member of the 
board of education of the grade schools at Virden for the past seven years. 

JOSEPH H. DONAHUE 

Joseph II. Donahue, representing the sixth legislative district in the 
general assembly, is also prominent in the public life of Chicago as demo- 
cratic committeeman of the forty-seventh ward and as purchasing agent for the 
Chicago board of education. He was born in Chicago in 18711. a son of Daniel 
and Mary (Ellis) Donahue. The father came to this city from Providence, 
Rhode Island, while the mother was a native of Ireland. 

Joseph H. Donahue pursued his education in the Christian Brothers school 
and in St. Patrick's Commercial Academy. When his textbooks were put aside 
he entered the commercial field and for ten years was sales manager for the 
mercantile house of J. Friedman & Company. He was afterward called to public 
office and for five years was chief clerk in the return department of the bailiff 
of the municipal court of Chicago. From 1924 until 1931 he served as assistant 
secretary and chief examiner for the Cook County Civil Service Commission. 
Mr. Donahue has been a lifelong democrat, is the recognized leader of his 
party in the forty-seventh ward and is one of the democrats of Cook county 
who have always been in the van in relation to public betterment. Ids support 
being always counted upon to further every measure and movement for the 
general good. He belongs to the Knights of Columbus and to the Catholic 
Cider of Foresters. Heavy responsibilities rest upon him as purchasing agent 
for the board of education of Chicago, nor does he lightly regard his duties as 
a state representative, having been sent from the sixth district to the legis- 
lative halls of Illinois. 



MICHAEL J. O'CONNOR 

Michael J. O'Connor, who is now serving as deputy comptroller of Cook 
county. Illinois, has for over thirty-two years been active in political affairs 
and has been a tower of strength in the democratic party. He is widely known 
as one of the most loyal adherents of Illinois Democracy, and has always given 
his best effort in those positions he has occupied. He has been a member of 
numerous democratic committees. 

Mr. O'Connor is a native of the city of Chicago, in which city his birth 
occurred January 24. 1871. His father, Patrick O'Connor, was born in County 
Wexford. Ireland, and with his parents came to the United States when very 
young. Patrick O'Connor died when M. J. O'Connor was only five years old. 
The hitter's mother, Mary (Harper) O'Connor, was born in County Wexford. 
Ireland, and was brought to Chicago when she was two years of age. Her 
death occurred fifteen years ago, when she had attained her seventy-fifth year. 

Michael J. O'Connor received his early education in the parochial schools 
of Chicago, but when only twelve years old found employment with Armour & 
Company. Later he was in business for himself and. finally thirty-five years 
ago, took his first political position, which was in the office of Thomas Barrett, 
sheriff of Cook county. Twenty-four years ago, he first entered the office of 



72 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

County Clerk Sweitzer, and in this important political work he has since been 
associated, now holding the official titles of deputy comptroller and clerk of the 
board of commissioners of Cook county. When he was thirty-two years old, 
Mr. O'Connor was a committeeman of the old thirty-second ward, which is 
now the seventeenth, and he is now chairman of the executive committee in 
this same political division. He was a protege of that outstanding democrat of 
this generation, George E. Brennan, and learned many things about party 
service from that wonderful leader. 

In the year 1903, Mr. O'Connor was united in marriage to Miss Ida King, 
whose birthplace was Saginaw, Michigan. To their happy union one daughter 
was born, Mary Helen, who is a graduate of Parker high school and at this 
writing is attending the Moser Business College. 

Mr. O'Connor's religion is that of the Roman Catholic Church, and he is 
a member of the Knights of Columbus. His parish is St. Bernard's. He has 
been very popular in his home city and is generally known as a citizen with 
unquestioned public spirit and high honor. 



J. EDWARD TAYLOR 



In presenting to the public the representative men of the educational insti- 
tutions of the city of Springfield and the state of Illinois, and in fact of our 
nation, who have by superior force of character and energy, together with a 
combination of ripe qualities of professional ability and excellence, made them- 
selves conspicuous and commanding in public and private life, we have no example 
more fit to present, and none more worthy a place in this volume than he whose 
name is the caption of this necessarily brief record. Not only has he risen above 
the general standards of his profession, but he also possesses in high degree those 
excellencies of human nature that make men worthy of regard among their 
fellows. He is high-minded and liberal, keenly alive to all the varied requirements 
of our educational institutions. 

The regime of J. Edward Taylor as superintendent of schools has been a 
period of marked development in our educational institutions and one of sus- 
tained progress. Mr. Taylor has administered the responsible duties of his office 
with rare ability and judgment, and has made himself one of the most popular 
school executives ever to fill this position. Endowed with a natural talent for 
such work, he perfected his knowledge and fitness by long years of actual ex- 
perience, and by close study of the student mind and character, also of the 
various methods that have been utilized in conducting schools. That his ability, 
work and character have met with the hearty approval of the people is fully 
demonstrated by his re-election to office on November 6, 19.'34. 

Mr. Taylor was born on a farm near Williamsville, Illinois, on the 30th of 
March, 1866, and is a son of the late Isaac Jefferson and Mary Ann (McOinnis) 
Taylor. His father, of English descent, was also born on the farm near Williams- 
ville. J. Edward Taylor was the third of five children born to his parents, the 
others having been as follows: Dr. A. Douglas Taylor, who is now retired from 
professional life, and is living in Dayton Beach, Florida ; Ethel, now deceased, who 
was the wife of Robert Kennedy, of Elkhart, Illinois; Leonard and Thomas, both 
deceased; and Palmer Taylor, who now resides in Williamsville. 

The early years of Mr. Taylor's life, when he was growing to young man- 
hood, were passed on the home farm. He attended the common schools and was 
an assiduous student, with the result that when he was sixteen years old we find 
him in possession of a teacher's certificate and at seventeen years of age teaching 
school. He received his certificate with an average grade-mark of eighty-six and 
a half per cent. In Athens and in Williamsville. he taught, and in 1905 became 
principal of the famous Douglas School, sometimes known as the Trapp School; 
he was here for twenty-two years or from 100.") until 1927. This school, which is 
now standing at Mason, Walnut and Reynolds streets in Springfield, then stood 
on land bounded by First, Second and Mason streets. .Mr. Taylor's capabilities 




J. EDWARD TAYLOR 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 75 

as a teacher and principal became widely known through these years and 
his ideas concerning school technique and the juvenile mind were proved to be 
sound and practical. In 1927 he became a candidate for the office of superin- 
tendent of schools in Sangamon county. The honor of his victory is well reflected 
in the fact that he was the only democrat on his ticket who was elected at that 
time. He has justified the faith and confidence of the voters in every manner. 
No man who ever held this office in the state has surpassed him in the amount 
of time and energy he has given to personal contact with the schools, pupils and 
teachers under his jurisdiction. Every working day finds him studying the schools 
at first hand and he leaves nothing to theory in his governing tactics. He has 
been a practical superintendent who has obtained results. One instance of his 
ideas in educational science is the use of work books, whereby the child is taught 
to read much earlier than in former years. Children in the first year of school, 
under this system, read as well in their grade as the eighth grade did in theirs, 
which is a most interesting advancement in school work. Mr. Taylor is a member 
of the Illinois State Teachers Association, the Sangamon County Institute of 
Teachers, and the State Superintendents' Association. 

On the 24th of June, 1886, Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to Miss Louisa 
Sell, who was born in Elkhart, Illinois, a daughter of Andrew and Mary Turley 
Sell. The father of Mrs. Taylor came from Germany when he was sixteen years 
old, first settled in Wisconsin, then in Illinois and was a farmer all of his life. 
The mother was of the noted pioneer Turley family in the vicinity of Williams- 
ville, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor became the parents of one daughter, Alice, 
who is the widow of Howard Sweeney of Nashville, Tennessee, and she makes 
her home with her father in Springfield. Educational work is also the field for 
her activities, especially music, in which work she has been closely associated with 
her father. Mrs. Taylor passed away July 19, 1930. 

As a side vocation, and one in which he has been outstandingly successful, 
Mr. Taylor is a farmer. He is the owner of a modern farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres in Clark county, Wisconsin, and on this area he raises corn, oats, barley, 
wheat, and beans, also has about thirty-five head of Guernsey cattle. His religious 
affiliation is with the West Side Christian Church in Springfield, and he iN ;i 
Mason, belonging to Tyrian Lodge, No. 333, of which he is past master. 

Democratic politics have had a rock-ribbed adherent for many years in 
Mr. Taylor, and he has exerted every effort and influence at his command to 
assist in the progress and success of the party. His public-spirit and his co- 
operative attitude in community affairs have won for him hosts of friends over 
a wide territory. Mr. Taylor possesses, in no small degree, that mysterious and 
magnetic charm which, intangible as the spirit of life itself, yet manifests itself 
with dynamic force in all relations, and differentiates the possessor from the com- 
monplace. It is impossible to estimate the value of such a man to city, state and 
nation. His influence ramifies throughout the whole human fabric. Mr. Taylor 
lias made a record of which his family and friends may well feel proud. 



.MICHAEL JAMES BRANSFIELD 

Michael James Bransfield, a well known representative of the investment 
business, with offices at 120 South LaSalle street, Chicago, was bora April 19, 
1887, in the city which is yet his home, a son of .Michael J. and Margaret 
(Hanlon) Bransfield. His education was acquired in St. Bernard's parochial 
school and in St. Ignatius College of Chicago, which institution conferred upon 
him the Bachelor of Arts degree. When his textbooks were put aside lie 
entered the investment field and is a partner in the corporation of Michael J. 
Bransfield & Sons. Inc.. the tii-in largely handling municipal securities. The 
business has been developed along substantial lines and the enterprise and 
progressive spirit of its owners is manifest in the gratifying success which they 
have won. 

At Harbor Springs, Michigan, on the lib of September, 1922, Mr. I'»r;nis 



76 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

field was married to Miss Marguerite Miller and they have become parents of 
four children, Charles, Marguerite, .Michael J. and Miller Bransfield. Mr. 
Bransfield is well known socially, having membership in the Lake Shore Ath- 
letic Club and the Klossmoor Country Club — associations which indicate much 
of the nature of his interests and activities outside of business, while his politi- 
cal allegiance is foreshadowed in his membership in the Iroquois Club. He is 
a communicant of the Catholic Church. 



GIBSON E. (JO KM AN 



(iibson B. Gorman, judge of the municipal court of Chicago and an out- 
standing figure in democratic circles here, was born April 8, 1 S ! ) 7 , in the city 
which is still his home, his parents being Henry E. and Susan (Gorman) 
Gorman, both of whom were natives of County Clare, Ireland. Coming to the 
new world, the father joined the Chicago police force, became a police captain 
and was a veteran of the Uaymarket riot, in which the policemen did heroic 
service in crushing the insurrection of the Reds. His death occurred in 1919 
and his widow survived until 1926, both being laid to rest in Mount Olivet 
Cemetery of Chicago. 

(iil)son E. Gorman attended the public schools and afterward entered 
Loyola University in PUT as a law student. He there pursued a thorough four 
years' course and won his LL. B. degree in 1921. The same year he was admitted 
to the bar and at once entered upon active practice, in which he has since con- 
tinued, making steady progress in his chosen field as study and experience have 
heightened his powers and enabled him to cope successfully with intricate legal 
problems. He enjoys the respect and confidence of his professional brethren 
and is a member of both the Chicago and Illinois State Bar Associations. The 
offices which he has held have been in the direct path of his profession, for he 
served in the office of the city prosecutor under Mayor William E. Dever and 
in 1 !)•')! became assistant corporation counsel under Mayor Cermak. He was 
then elected to fill the unexpired term of Judge Francis B. Allegretti, who 
was elected to the circuit court, and in November, 1934, was reelected to the 
municipal court of Chicago, where already he has mad? an excellent record by 
the fairness and impartiality of his decisions. 

Judge Gorman was married to Miss Dorothy Doorley, a granddaughter 
of Mrs. Elizabeth Rogers, who organized the Catholic Order of Foresters, of 
which she was for many years high chief ranger. Judge and Mrs. Gorman have 
become the parents of three children : Dorothy Mary, a student in the Academy 
of Our Lady at Ninety-fifth and Throop streets in Chicago; (iibson E. ; and 
Harry. The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic Church and the 
•Judge is a fourth degree member of the Knights of Columbus. He belongs to 
the Ridge Country Club and he is well known as a prominent representative of 
the democratic party, being secretary of the Nineteenth Ward Democratic Club 
and a member of the Iroquois Club. He has a very wide acquaintance among 
those who have guided the destinies of the party in Chicago and his opinions 
carry much weight in party councils. 



WILLIAM W. LINK 



It requires much more than party loyalty for a man to be a good public 
official in a city the size of Chicago, where heavy responsibilities rest upon 
<-\rvy officeholder. The interests represented are so extensive and so important 
that marked business ability and keen foresight must feature in the records 
of each public official. Measuring up to every requirement, William W. Link 
is now rendering valuable service as president of the board of local improve- 
ments. Lor over twenty years he has labored actively for his party and its 
successes and has done much to influence the Slavic vote of Chicago. 

Mr. Link was born in Poland on the 12th of February, 1884, and came witb 
his parents, John and Cecelia (Munchkowski) Link, to the United States when 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 77 

but one year old. He attended the grade and high schools and also Lewis 
Institute, in which he pursued an engineering course. Early in his business 
life he became connected with the Imperial Japanning Company. His interests 
and activities have never been circumscribed. While giving full attention to 
business or other affairs, he has always found time and opportunity to express 
his opinion upon public matters of vital importance and to support every 
movement or project which he deemed would be of general good. A lifelong 
democrat, he is treasurer of the Forty-first Ward Organization and a co-worker 
of Thomas J. Bowler. He is also assistant treasurer of the Polish-American 
Democratic Organizations of Illinois and is second vice president of the United 
Slavic Organizations of the United States, in which he is associated with Otto 
Kerner, now attorney general of Illinois. During the 1932 campaign, Mr. Link, 
through his connection with the Slavic organizations of the country, did yeo- 
man service in the ranks of the democratic party, where his work has extended 
over twenty years and where his influence in known to make for all that is 
progressive and worth while. On the 25th of June, 1933, he assumed the duties 
of his present office as president of the board of local improvements and in this 
connection he closely studies the vital questions which come up for settlement 
as to the most timely and most beneficial expenditure of public funds. 

On the 1st of June, 1909, Mr. Link was married to Miss Frances Wisnieski 
and they have five children : Robert, Helen, Oren, Genevieve and Chester. Mr. 
Link belongs to the Lake Shore Athletic Club, to the Polish National Alliance 
and to the Chicago Society. 



FRANK VINCENT ZINTAK 

On the roster of Illinois' political leaders appears the name of Frank Vincent 
Zintak, who is now clerk of the superior court of Cook county. He was born 
October -1, 1888, in the twelfth ward of Chicago, and his home has been in that 
section of the city continuously since. He was one of the seven children of Joseph 
and Paulina Zintak and he attended parochial and public schools until thirteen 
years of age, when it became necessary for him to provide for his own support. 
He first learned the trade of electrician and worked in that field until his labors 
and economies had brought him sufficient eapitol to enable him to establish an 
independent business as a general building contractor when twenty-three years 
of age. He has also previously had some experience in real estate lines and 
this was of value to him when he started out on his own account. Private business 
claimed his attention until after America entered the World war, when he became 
an investigator in special government matters in the office of Maclay Hoyne, then 
state's attorney of Cook county. Following the close of hostilities he resumed 
business as a contractor and operated successfully in that field until the lull 
caused by the depression beginning in 1929. 

From early youth Mr. Zintak has taken a keen interest in politics, supporting 
the principles of democracy. When he was but twenty-one years of age he was 
made a precinct captain and for a number of years lias served as ward committee- 
man. In May, 1931, following the resignation of M. S. Szymczak as clerk of the 
superior court, Mr. Zintak was unanimously recommended by the Cook county 
democratic central committee to fill the position. At a meeting of the superior 
court judges in the chambers of Judge Denis E. Sullivan. Mr. Zintak was unani- 
mously elected clerk of the superior court. In entering upon the duties of the 
position he at once displayed a determination to manage the office in accordance 
with the high standards set and maintained by his predecessor and his course 
is winning for him the highest commendation. 

.Mr. Zintak is married and has two children. Veronica and Frank \\. Jr., 
witli whom he occupies a pleasant home at 3134 Wesl Forty-fourth street. He 
belongs to St. Pancratius Roman Catholic Church and he is a member of various 
clubs and of civic and fraternal societies. He belongs to the Young People's 
Democratic Organization and he has been most active in furnishing food and 



78 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

fiu'l to every needy family in his ward during the past two years. He is con- 
stantly extending a helping hand where aid is needed and his cooperation can 
always be counted upon to support any civic project of real worth. His duties 
as superior court clerk, however, are manifold and receive the major part of Ins 
time and attention. Xo detail thereof is too unimportant to claim his interest. 
yet due stress is given to the greater responsibilities that devolve upon him in 
this connection. Not only party Leaders hut also his political opponents speak 
of his work in terms of praise. 



ALVA M. CLAVIN 



Alva .M. Clavin, residing at 1012 Locust street in Sterling, is filling the 
position of postmaster of his native city, for he was here horn August 4, 1875, 
a son of John and Josephine (Parker) Clavin. The father was born in Ireland, 
and the mother in Illinois. Alva M. Clavin became active in the work of the 
democratic party when a youth of hut seventeen years and he was called to 
office in 1902, when appointed city collector, a position which he filled until 
1904. In 1927 he was appointed a member of the board of review and served 
in that capacity for three years. In 1913 he was made district game warden 
and continued in the office until 1915, becoming postmaster in August of the 
latter year and serving until May, 1924. Ten years passed and he was recalled 
to the position of postmaster of Sterling, being appointed February 1. 1934 and 
commissioned on the 1st of July following. 

.Mr. Clavin was secretary of the democratic central committee of 
Whiteside county from 1909 until 1915 and acted as chairman thereof from 
1924 until January, 1984. lie attended the democratic national convention in 
Chicago in 1896 and again in 1932. For many years he has been the outstanding 
leader of democracy in Whiteside county. 

In 1902, Mr. Clavin took over his father's coal business, which he con- 
ducted concurrently with his public offices until he entered the postoffiee for 
the first time, and from 1924 until 1934 he was engaged in the real estate and 
insurance business also. 

On the 13th of October. 1903, Mr. Clavin was united in marriage to Miss 
Gertrude Lendman, who passed away on June 18, 1922, leaving two children. 
Helen and Alva M. Clavin, Jr. Mr. Clavin is a communicant of the Catholic 
Church and fraternally he is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus and the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 



ALBERT H. MANUS 

One of the notable democrats of the state of Illinois is Judge Albert II. 
Manus of Freeport. Stephenson county. For a number of reasons, he holds an 
eminent position in the ranks of Illinois Democracy, and is one of the foremost 
leaders of the party in Stephenson county. He has given many years of de- 
voted service to the party in campaigns and in his official positions has added 
prestige to the personnel of democracy. Men of his type have been responsible 
lor the success of the party during recent years, and to them its future greatness 
may he attributed, judge Manus is of democratic lineage, and from his boy- 
hood days the Jeffersonian principles of political science have been foremost 
in his training. He was the first democratic states attorney ever elected in 
Stephenson county. He was the first democrat ever elected circuit judge from 
Freeport, and he and Judge Sheean were the first democratic judges electe I 
from the circuit since 1880. 

•Judge Manus is a native of Ridott, Stephenson county. Illinois, his birth 
occurring <><\ the Nth of April, 1881. He is a son of Gerjet and Rena (Dirksen) 
Manus. Gerjet Manus was born in Ostfriesland, Germany, October 9, 1830, 
.ind died April 27. 1911. He came across the Atlantic to the United States in 
the year 1854 and settled in Ridott township. Stephenson county. Illinois. He 
was well educated before he left the fatherland, and as a young man taught 




ALVA M. (LAVIX 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 81 

school for ten or twelve years. He then began farming to earn his livlihood 
and made a pronounced success in this occupation. The democratic party re- 
ceived his political allegiance, and he always worked with sincere interest in 
local and county politics. He held township office for a period of twenty years. 
He was a man of deeply religious nature, and was a member and active in the 
Presbyterian Church. Rena (Dirksen) Manus, his wife, was born in Emden, 
Germany, November 15, 1841, and died April 22, 1904. Of their children there 
are three sons surviving, of whom the immediate subject of this biography was 
the youngest. The eldest, D. G., who lived in Pearl City, Stephenson county, 
and is now a resident of Minnesota, was elected seven times to the board of 
supervisors of Loran township and was chairman of this board for three years. 
S. G., the second son, is a minister in the Presbyterian Church and lives in 
Foreston, Illinois. 

Judge Albert H. Manus received his first education in the rural schools of 
Ridott and Silver Creek townships, Stephenson county. This course concluded, 
he took up his higher and his legal studies at the University of Minnesota, and 
from this splendid institution received his Bachelor of Arts degree in the year 
1905. He was admitted to the bar in October, 1907, and in the same year es- 
tablished himself in the practice of his profession. He was elected states 
attorney in 1912, and served one term of four years. As noted previously, he 
was the first democratic states attorney in Stephenson county. He served 
eight years as city attorney, — from 1921 to 1927 and from 1931 to 1933. Tn 
June, 1933, he was elected circuit judge, his circuit including Jo Daviess, 
Stephenson, Carroll, Ogle and Lee counties. In democratic organizations of 
Stephenson county, Judge Manus has always been very active. He was chair- 
man of the Stephenson county central committee for six years, and was secre- 
tary of the committee from 1930 until he resigned to become circuit judge. 
He has attended several democratic state conventions as a delegate. 

On July 1, 1909, Judge Manus was married to Miss Kathryn Rowenhorst. 
and they have a son, Albert H. Jr., who is a student in the University of Chi- 
cago Law School. The judge's religious affiliation is with the Presbyterian 
Church, and he has been a member of its board. He is a thirty-second degree 
Mason, and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



BERNARD J. KORZENESKI 

Bernard J. Korzeneski, examiner of titles in the office of the registrar of 
titles in the County building of Cook county, was born in Chicago, Augusl :!. 
1906. His father, also a native of Chicago, died in February, 1929, bul his 
mother, who bore the maiden name of Anna Jendrzejek, is still living. 

Bernard J. Korzeneski attended the parochial schools and was graduated 
from the Quigley Preparatory Seminary of Chicago in 1924. He then entered 
the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, from which he was graduated with 
the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1928. lie next went to Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
where he spent a year as a student in the Harvard Law School. Following his 
father's death he had to return to Chicago, and he completed his law course in 
the Northwestern University, which conferred upon him the Doctor of Juris- 
prudence degree in February. 1932. Tn that year he became associated with 
the law firm of Russell, Murphy & Quigley, with offices at 2!) South LaSalle 
street. In September, 1932, lie was appointed to a position in the office of the 
corporation counsel and was assigned to duty in the city prosecutor's office. 
On the 7th of September, 1933, he was made escrow officer in the office of 
the registrar of titles of Cook county and on the 26th of June, 1934, was an 
pointed examiner of titles in the office of registrar of titles, which position he 
is now oecuoyin<r. On the 1st of January, 1934, he became a partner in the 
law firm of Jarecki-Brautigam-Korzeneski & Kearney, one of the senior partners, 
Mr. Jarecki, being a son of County Judge Edmund K. Jarecki. 

Mr. Korzeneski belongs to the Knights of Columbus and to the Notre Dam ■ 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Club of Chicago, in which he has ;i student membership, and he is likewise a 
student member of the Lake Shore Athletic Club, lie greatly enjoys certain 
spoils, and members of the law firm with which he is associated are all ardent 
poloists. He is also interested in equestrian sports and is a good squash player 
and handball player. Thus he finds outlet for physical activity and for his 
social nature. He likewise belongs to the Thirty-third Ward Democratic Organ- 
ization and is an active member, doing everything in his power to promote demo- 
cratic interests and successes in Cook county. 



ARTHUR W. MITCHELL 

Arthur W. Mitchell, a man of broad vision whose labors have al all times 
been actuated by high ideals of service, has done notable work in behalf of the 
colored race in Chicago, where he is a recognized leader among the followers 
of demcracy and who was elected on November 6, 1934 to Congress from the 
First Congressional District of Chicago, and who holds the distinction of being 
the first democrat of the negro race to be elected to Congress in the history 
of the country. He makes his home at 3657 South Parkway and maintains a 
law office at 417 East Forty-seventh street. Born in Roanoke, Alabama, De- 
cember 22, 1883, he is a son of Taylor and Ammar (Patterson) Mitchell, who 
were also natives of that state, and both were born in slavery. The father 
devoted his life to farming. 

Arthur W. Mitchell obtained his early education in Randolph and Cham- 
bers counties of Alabama, attending the public schools, and afterward entered 
the Tuskegee State Normal and Industrial Institute in Alabama in 1899. There 
he served as office boy for Booker T. Washington while pursuing his studies 
and he later took a teachers' course in the Snow Hill Normal and Industrial 
College at Snow mi.. Alabama, wnere he won his diploma. He subsequently 
taught in the public schools of Alabama and for seven consecutive years he 
pursued special courses in English, education and philosophy in Harvard 
University. This was followed by postgraduate work at Columbia University 
in economics and philosophy. 

Mr. Mitchell has made valuable contribution to educational progress among 
his people. He founded the Armstrong Agricultural School in 1908 at West 
Butler, Alabama, and served as its principal until he resigned in 1917 to enter 
military training at Camp Pike, Arkansas. He also served on the Home Defense 
League in Alabama. In 1919 he removed to Washington, D. C, and read law 
there for a period of three years, during which time he also engaged in the real 
estate business. The year 1924 witnessed his removal to Chicago and he was 
admitted to practice at the Illinois bar in 1927. The following year he opened 
his office on Fast Forty-seventh street and has since engaged in practice here, 
winning a constantly growing business. 

In 1904, at Greensboro, Alabama, Mr. Mitchell was united in marriage to 
Miss Eula King, who passed away in 1909, leaving a son, Arthur W., .Jr., now a 
resident of Chicago. In 1911 Mr. Mitchell was again married, his second union 
being- with Annie II. Harris, of Watertown, Connecticut. She was associated 
with .Mr. Mitchell in his work at the Armstrong Agricultural College and she 
is a stanch member of the Second Ward Regular Democratic Club, to which 
Mr. Mitchell also belongs. He has ever taken an active part in civic and politi- 
cal work and (hiring the Roosevelt campaign made speeches in behalf of the 
democratic presidential candidate from New York to California. He was 
selected by the regular democratic organization to become the candidate for 
eongress from the first Illinois district to fill the vacancy caused by the death 
of Harry A. Laker, the primary nominee, and, as noted, was duly elected. Mv. 
Mitchell has always been actuated by broad humanitarian principles and in 
1920 he founded the Mutual Housing Company of Washington, D. C, organized 
for the purpose of securing better housing conditions for the colored race. He 
has been national president of the Phi Beta Sigma since 1925 and he is a member 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 83 

of the Masonic fraternity, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. Throughout his 
life he has read broadly and thought deeply and is a man of broad intelligence, 
with comprehensive understanding of many of the vital problems of municipal 
and federal government. He has always worked for progress and upbuilding 
and his labors have been far-reaching and resultant. 



HON. JOSEPH G. CERNY 

Hon. Joseph G. Cerny, president of Cicero, to which office he was elected 
April 5, 1932, is one of the most popular residents of the town which has been 
his home for the past nineteen years. Mr. Cerny was born in Chicago, Illinois, 
in 1898, and is a son of the late Lee and Agnes (Mydild) Cerny, who still reside 
in Cicero. 

Joseph G. Cerny acquired his education in the grammar schools and in the 
Harrison high school of Chicago. Very early in life he started out to provide 
for ins own support by taking up electrical work, in which capacity he became 
assocated with the Chicago Surface Lines and remained with the corporation up 
to the time of the World war. 

After the United States joined the allies, Mr. Cerny became a member of the 
the Twenty-sixth Engineers located at Camp Forest in Georgia and after receiving 
his honorable discharge he again resumed his position with the Chicago Surface 
Lines, remaining therewith until 1928. All through the years from the time he 
attained his majority Mr. Cerny was interested in politics and became an active 
participant therein. In 1929 he was appointed chief deputy clerk of the superior 
court of Cook county, and after several years of service in that capacity lie was 
promoted to the position of chief deputy of the superior court of Cook county. 
He made an excellent record in both offices and won for himself a prominent 
position in democratic circles. In his home community he has found opportunity 
to express his interest in civic welfare by service on the Cicero board of education, 
to which position he was elected for a term of three years and was then re-elected 
in 1931 by a large majority. This was followed by his election on the 5th of April, 
1932, to the office of president of the town of Cicero, and as its chief executive he 
is making an excellent record, largely advancing municipal interests through his 
devotion to the general good and his recognition of the opportunities afforded him 
to further public welfare through the avenue of official activity. 

Mr. Cerny was married to Miss Mildred Novak, who was also born in Chicago 
and who is the daughter of Dagobert Novak, publisher of various suburban news- 
papers. 

Mr. Cerny is a member of various organizations, social, fraternal and civic. 
He belongs to the Sokol Slavskv of Cicero, the Order of Christopher Columbus 
No. 193, C. S. P. S. ; Praha Lodge No. 231, I. 0. 0. F. ; Cicero Lodge No. 955, 
A. F. & A. M. ; Cicero Lodge No. 1510, B. P. O. E. ; Syracusan Lodge No. 500 
of the Knights of Pythias; and Prokop Lodge No. 4 of the Order of Tabors. He 
likewise belongs to the International Brotherhood of Electricians, Local No. 713, 
and by reason of his military service has become a member of American Legion 
Post No. 96 and Anton J. Cermak Post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. His 
activities and his interests are thus broad and varied and his labors have covered 
a wide scope along lines that are beneficial to the entire community. 

As president of the town of Cicero, Mr. Cerny governs a Chicago suburb 
with a population of sixty-six thousand, seven hundred within the territory known 
as the metropolitan district of Chicago. It lias various industrial and mercantile 
concerns of importance and is the home of the Morton high school, with a student 
body of sixty-five hundred, having the second highest scholastic rating in Illinois. 
There are also twelve public grammar schools and some twenty-five churches 
and parochial schools. Important business interests center here and are served 
by three banks and by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, Illinois Central, Balti- 
more & Ohio Chicago Terminal, Indiana Harbor Belt and Merchants -.V Manufac- 



84 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 



turers Railroads. 

trustees, a town 
present has no bonded 



A township form of government, represented by a board of 
clerk and president of the board, governs the town, which at 
londed indebtedness. 



NORBERT IIOTZ 



The name of Ilotz is closely associated with political activity in Madison 
county, where Norbert Hotz is now filling the office of county clerk. He was 
born in Edwardsville, Illinois, March 12, 1888. His father, Joseph Hotz, a 
native of Madison county, this state, entered mercantile business as proprietor 
of the Model Department Store in Edwardsville. In 1900 he was elected sheriff 
of Madison county and he was appointed postmaster of Edwardsville under 
President Woodrow Wilson during his first administration, while during the 
second Wilson administration he received appointment to the office of internal 
revenue inspector. In 1922 he was nominated for county clerk but was re- 
ported defeated in the general election, which, however, he contested, and after 
sixteen months he was declared the successful nominee and was installed in 
office, continuously serving to the time of his death in June, 1933. 

Norbert Hotz was educated in parochial schools and the high school of 
Edwardsville and started out in the business world with the N. O. Nelson Manu- 
facturing Company, with which he remained until the United States became 
involved in the World war. He entered the service at Camp Zaehary Taylor 
in Kentucky and was discharged in June, 1919, as sergeant of the headquarters 
company. He was a civilian employe for about eight months, and he is now 
an active and valued member of the American Legion. 

Following his military experience Mr. Hotz spent three years in Denver, 
Colorado, in charge of the Oaks Home Sanitarium Commissary, after which he 
returned home and entered the office of the county clerk as his father's deputy. 
Upon his father's death in June, 1933, he succeeded him in the office, with the 
work of which he had become thoroughly familiar, so that he was well qualified 
to assume the added duties and responsibilities. He has always been active in 
party work since attaining his majority, has never failed to express his opinions 
at the ballot box and was an alternate to the state convention held in Springfield 
in 1934. In the same year he was nominated for the office which he is now 
filling by over six thousand votes. 

On 'the 24th of September, 1924, Mr. Hotz married Miss Mayme B. 
Xeudecker, of Marine, Madison county, Illinois. She is active in the American 
Legion Auxiliary, identified with the post at Marine, while Mr. Hotz is connected 
with Edwardsville Post. They belong to St. Elizabeth's Catholic Church at 
Marine and Mr. Hotz is connected with the Knights of Columbus. In former 
years he played baseball on the Edwardsville team, being left fielder when the 
team played at Buffalo, New York, in Kansas and in Indiana and he yet feels 
a keen interest in the sport. 



JOSEPH J. DRUCKER 



Joseph J. Drucker, who was elected to the municipal court bench of Chicago 
on November 6, 1934, is a member of the well known law firm of Sabath, Perlman, 
Goodman & Rein; was formerly assistant attorney general of the state, and for 
over a decade was secretary to Congressman A. J. Sabath, whom he assisted in all 
his nationwide congressional work. 

Mr. Drucker was born in Chicago, August 11, 1900, and after the completion 
of his elementary studies at the Richard Yates grammar school he entered the 
Carl Schurz high school, from which in due course of time he was graduated. He 
next matriculated in the University of Chicago, but during the World war he 
put aside his textbooks and all personal considerations to enter the Fort Sheridan 
training school, in which he was commissioned a second lieutenant of infantry. 
Following the war he entered the American consular service ami was assigned 
to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where he served for two years. 




NORBERT HOTZ 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 87 

Mr. Drucker then returned to Chicago and pursued his legal studies in the 
l)e Paul University School of Law while working in the Federal Reserve Bank. 
Upon his admission to the har he became connected with the law firm of Mayer, 
Meyer, Austrian & Piatt. He took up law practice in this city in 1923 and his 
legal experience has been both valuable and diversified. After concluding his 
association with Mayer, Meyer, Austrian & Piatt he became associated in the 
general practice of law with Congressman A. J. Sabath, to whom he has also 
rendered valuable service as assistant in his congressional work. In 1931 Mr. 
Drucker became assistant corporation counsel of the city of Chicago under Mayor 
Cermak and he is now assistant attorney general of the state of Illinois. His 
private interests are represented by his partnership relations with the firm of 
Sabath, Perlman, Goodman & Rein. 

Since attaining his majority Mr. Drucker has been well known in democratic 
circles because 'of the efficient work he has done for the party. During the last 
three presidential campaigns he has handled all of the publicity and campaign 
matter for his party throughout the nation for foreign language groups and 
newspapers. He is a splendid organizer, recognizing the possibilities for strength 
in any given combination, and he has always been a thorough student of the 
vital problems before the country, political or otherwise. He belongs to the 
Iroquois Club and he has been very active in ward and organization politics, 
making his home in the twenty-first ward. 

Mr. Drucker enjoys many outdoor sports and he has a host of friends not 
only in Chicago but throughout the country, for he has traveled widely. He 
maintains pleasant relations with his former military comrades through his mem- 
bership in the American Legion, and in the professional field his membership 
connection is with the Chicago, Illinois State and American Bar Associations. 



THOMAS A. GREEN 



Thomas A. Green, a representative of the Cook county judiciary, was 
called to the bench in 1930 and brought to the duties of the office the value of 
wide experience in the practice of law. Judge Green is a native of South 
Chicago, Illinois, born August 7, 1892, his parents being John 1). and Oretta 
(Clark) Green, both natives of Ohio. The father came to Cook county, Illinois, 
forty-eight years ago and is now a pensioner of the Chicago city fire depart- 
ment, with which he served on active duty for twenty-eight years. 

Thomas A. Green pursued his studies in the Chicago public schools, at- 
tended high school and became a night scholar at the Central Y. M. C. A., from 
which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1910. He next entered the 
Illinois College of Law and completed his course in 1914, at which time the LL. 
B. degree was conferred upon him. He has also taken special courses in the 
University of Chicago and he has always been a (dose student of the under- 
lying principles of law. He engaged in general practice for nineteen years 
and he was associated with the state's attorney's office in 1916 and 1917 under 
Maclay Hoyne. In the year 1923 he was appointed to duty in the office of the 
corporation counsel and in 1930 was called to the bench, being made one of tin 1 
judges of Cook county. He has now served for four years and his record has 
gained the commendation of the great majority of his fellow citizens. 

On the 10th of June, 1916, in Chicago, Judge Green was united in marriage 
to Miss Mary McBee, a daughter of Thomas and Clara McBee, of Mansfield, 
Ohio, and a graduate of Ohio State University. Thomas McBee was long an 
active factor in democratic politics in the Buckeye state. Judge and Mrs. Green 
are the parents of two daughters, Virginia and Mary Elizabeth, who are seven- 
teen and sixteen years of age, respectively. 

The military record of Judge Green covers two years' service with the 
United States Marines. He enlisted in April, 1917, and became a sergeant. 
After spending four months in the Philadelphia navy yards he boarded the 



88 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

I '. S. S. Charleston in July, 1917, and was on duty on thai vessel until September, 
1918, being mustered out in New York in October. 

Judge Green is a member of the Catholic Church. He belongs to the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles and to the American Legion and is a fourth degree 
member of the Knights of Columbus. He is also connected with the Illinois 
Athletic Club and along strictly professional lines his membership is with 
the Chicago, Illinois State and American Bar Associations. Politically he has 
been a stalwart democrat since easting his first vote and is a member of the 
regular democratic organization. lie has attended all of the state and national 
conventions of the party for the past decade and is well known to the political 
Leaders of Illinois. He makes his home at 10633 Avenue E in South Chicago 
and his fellow townsmen of that community, in which he has always lived, are 
proud of his record and speak of him in terms of warm regard. 



EUGENE L. McGARRY 



Eugene L. McGarry, judge of the municipal court of Chicago, was born 
at Bloomington, Illinois, fifty-five years ago. He attended the ( hicago public 
schools and studied law at the Chicago-Kent College of Law. where he received 
the LL. B. degree. He was admitted to the bar in 1915 and has engaged in 
general practice since that time. His ability is recognized by his professional 
colleagues and is attested by the public in the liberal clientage accorded him. 

Mr. McGarry has always been found as a stalwart figure in democratic 
ranks and his first official duties were performed when he was a deputy collector 
in the county treasurer's office from 1911 to 1914. He was an assistant state's 
attorney during 1918 and 1919 and assistant attorney for the sanitary district 
from February to November, 1928. In the primaries of April, 1!>:>4, he was 
nominated for judge of the municipal court, having received the endorsement 
of the regular democratic organization, and elected November 6, 1934. He is 
a member of the Law Institute, maintains offices at 155 North ('lark- street 
and resides at 657 Roscoe street in Chicago. 



PETER M. KELLY (II) 

Peter M. Kelly (II) is one of the county commissioners of Cook county, a 
position that carries with it many onerous duties. He was elected to the office in 
1930 and again in 1934 by large majorities, and the record which he has made 
has indicated his unfaltering devotion to the best interests of the community. A 
native of Ireland, Mr. Kelly was born in 1887 and was brought to Chicago when 
but a year old by his father, Peter M. Kelly (I), who established the family home 
in this city. He joined the Chicago police force and was advanced from the ranks 
to the position of sergeant, while ultimately he became a lieutenant and a captain. 
Under Mayor Edward F. Dunne he became an inspector. This was a new office 
on the force and Mr. Kelly was the first man to be appointed, being named for 
the place in 1905, there being but four inspectors in connection with the entire 
police department. Peter M. Kelly (I) passed away in 1908. 

Ilis son, Peter M. Kelly (II), acquired his education in the public schools 
and a business college, and starting out in life to provide for his own support, 
obtained employment with Seai-s Roebuck & Company. 1912 he turned his 
attention to the undertaking business, in which he has since been successfully 
engaged, a liberal patronage being accorded him. He maintains a funeral chapel 
at 238 South ( Jicero avenue and manifests the utmost care and tact in the conduct 
of his business. 

Mr. Kelly has always taken a keen interest in politics as a democratic sup- 
porter and in 191] became precinct captain of the old thirteenth ward. He has 
figured very prominently in democratic organization work and is now captain 
of his precinct in the thirtieth ward. In 1926 he was elected a member of the 
state central committee and served in that position for four years. In 1930 he 
was chosen a member of the board of Cook county commissioners and again in 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 89 

1934 was elected by a large majority, the vote being indicative of the excellent 
record which he had made and the confidence reposed in him by the general 
public. For twenty-two years he lias been active in the political circles of the 
thirtieth ward, where he is also well known through commercial and financial 
interests. 

Mr. Kelly was married to Miss Christiana Mullen, of Springfield, Illinois, 
and they have seven children, all yet living. He is particularly a home man and 
for the past eighteen years the family has occupied the same house. For an 
extended period he has displayed a keen interest in the welfare of the sick at 
the County Hospital and his humanitarian spirit prompts him to often extend a 
helping hand where aid is needed. He has the highest esteem and has won the 
praise of the staff of the hospital and in his work has their sympathetic coopera- 
tion, lie belongs to the Chicago Association of Commerce, the West Side Cham er 
of Commerce, the Garfield Park Business Men's Assoc. ation and tne Iv iiis 
Club, and his social qualities and sterling worth have made him popular „ all 
these different organizations. In religious faith he is a Catholic. 



MARY McENERNEY 



Mary McEnerney has the distinction of having been the first working women 
in the United States to be elected to public office. She has long been a worker in 
democratic ranks and has exerted wide influence among the women of Illinois in 
behalf of her party. She has studied broadly and deeply the vital political and 
labor problems that have been before the country in the past three decades and 
few women are able to speak with greater authority upon any questions connected 
therewith. 

Miss McEnerney, a native of Chicago, is one of a family of three daughters 
and two sons born to John and Catherine (Kilmartin) McEnerney. Her father 
was a native of Ireland and she has an inherent militant Irish background. The 
family lived in County Clare, whence representatives of the name came to seek 
the opportunities of the new world. Miss McEnerney attended the public schools 
but largely acquired her education in the "university of hard knocks." In a 
word, she is self-educated, gaining broad knowledge through experience, reading 
and investigation. She left school at the age of fourteen to work in a bindery and 
while thus employed became secretary of the tvnion, severing her connection with 
the bindery in order to work for the organization at a salary of ten dollars per 
week. Her labors have been most effective in the upbuilding of her union now 
the Bindery Women's Union, Local No. 30, is the largest organization of the 
kind in Illinois. She has been its representative for thirty years and she was 
the first organizer of the women's division of this union. Moreover, she has the 
distinction of being the first woman to hold office in the American Federation 
of Labor, being chosen vice president of the Illinois State Federation of Labor. 

During political campaigns Miss McEnerney has always worked for demo- 
cratic candidates and she was a stanch advocate of "votes for women" at Spring- 
field until woman's suffrage became a law in the state. She cast a ballot for 
university trustees when women were limited to vote only for this office. Governor 
Lowden appointed her to represent labor on a health insurance commission. She 
was elected a delegate-at-large to the national democratic convention in Houston, 
serving as the only woman delegate from Chicago. In 1930 she became county 
commissioner and lias since been connected with the board, acting on the special 
committee having to do with the juvenile homes and on the printing committee. 

Miss McEnerney says that Friday the 13th is her lucky day— a fact which 
shows that there is no superstition in her makeup. She belongs to St. Ansehn's 
Roman Catholic Church and she has rendered a valuable public service as a Red 
Cross worker, as a member of the State Council of Defense and in connection 
with the Liberty Loan drives during the World war. Never has she faltered in 
her activities in support of democracy since making her firsl political speech for 
Robert M. Sweitzer. Down through the years she has advocated those principles 



90 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

in which she so firmly believes, until ;it the present time, endorsing the views of 
Franklin I). Roosevelt, she is giving stanch support t<> the National Recovery 
Administration, believing that this will have a good effect on labor generally. 
She is a member of the hoard of directors of the Illinois Democratic Club and 
also has membership in the Illinois Club for Catholic Women. 



EDWARD F. A DELL 



With the attainment of his majority, polities became one of the active in- 
terests in the life of Edward E. Abell, who is now sheriff of Wabash county, 
his term of office extending from 1930 to December, 1934. He makes his home 
in .Mount Carmel, where lie is widely known. His birth occurred in Dubois 
county, Indiana. April I'll, 1<SS:>, his parents being Christopher C. and Mary M. 
(Chandley) Abell, who were also natives of Indiana, where they resided until 
1897 and then established their home in Wabash county, Illinois. The father 
followed the occupation of farming and he gave stanch support to the democratic 
party, never scratching his ticket. He passed away in 1918 and is still survived 
by his widow, who is making her home in Lancaster, Illinois. 

Edward F. Abell attended the country schools of Wabash county following 
his arrival here with his parents when a youth of fourteen years. From an 
early age. however, his time and attention were largely concentrated upon farm 
work- as he assisted his father in the cultivation and improvement of the home 
place. Later he operated threshing machines and a sawmill, continuing in that 
line of business until 1921, when he came to Mount Carmel, acting as an oil 
salesman for a short time and later spending a brief period in the employ of the 
Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railway. In 1927 he was called 
to public office, being made chief of police of Mount Carmel, and so excellent 
was his record in that position that in 1930 he was elected sheriff of Wabash 
county for a four years' term. He has been prompt, faithful and fearless in the 
discharge of his official duties and is an able custodian of the public peace. lie 
belongs to the Illinois State Sheriffs' Association, in whose meetings are held dis- 
cussions of all the questions relative to the duties of the office. He has always 
voted with the democratic party since age conferred upon him the right of fran- 
chise and has worked consistently for its successes. On several occasions he has 
attended the congressional, judicial and state conventions as well as the local 
party meeting, and he is a liberal donor to the democratic organization. 

On the 11th of September, 1902, Mr. Abell was married to Miss Fannie 
Holder, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George R. Holder, who have always given 
stanch allegiance to democracy. Mrs. Abell is likewise active in democratic 
work and has served on many local committees for the support of the party. 
She lias also given much time to the rearing of an adopted daughter. Zella 
Blanch, who is now the wife of Dan Gard. Mr. Abell belongs to the Loyal Order 
ill' Moose and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his religious faith is 
indicated in his membership in the Christian Church. 



THOMAS J. MATOUSEK 

One of the younger lawyers of ( hicago and Cook county, Illinois, who holds 
the important position of Chief Examiner of Titles for the county by appoint- 
ment of Clayton F. Smith is Thomas J. Matousek. 

Mr. Matousek is a native of Chicago, his birth having occurred in this city 
on the 22nd of January, 1897. His father, Albert Matousek, was born in 
Bohemia, and came to the United States in 1872, when he was twenty-eight 
years id' age. He settled in Chicago, where he followed his trade as blacksmith 
until his death in 1!)04. Mr. Matousek 's mother's maiden name was Anna 
Castoral. She was likewise born in Bohemia, and now makes her home in 
Cicero. Illinois. 

The grade and high schools of Cook county supplied Mr. Matousek with 
his preparatory education and then, having decided to study law, he entered 




HDWAKI) P. ABELL 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 93 

the College of Liberal Arts of the University of Chicago, and later pursued 
the stud}' of law at the Northwestern University Law School, and therefrom 
received his Bachelor of Laws degree in 1920. He was admitted to the bar of 
the state of Illinois in 1921, and then became associated with the prominent 
law firm of Goodnow, Matthews, Lucius and Buehler in Chicago. He retained 
this connection until March 1, 1922, on which date he was appointed escrow 
officer of Cook county, Joseph P. Haas then being registrar of titles. Mr. 
Matousek indicated outstanding ability and talent in this field of work and on 
January ], 1923 was appointed by Mr. Haas to the position of examiner of titles. 
He held this post until April, 1928, then was appointed assistant chief examiner 
of titles, and finally, on September 2, 1930, received his appointment to his 
present position. He has about sixty employees under his jurisdiction and is 
doina: a work of vast importance. Mr. Matousek is recognized as an authority on 
the Torrens Law. and has in course of preparation a comprehensive publication 
upon this subject. In addition to his county work he is also a lecturer on land 
titles at the Northwestern University Law School. 

Mr. Matousek was married November 26, 1924, to Miss Mary L. Horan, of 
Chicago, whose family has been identified with the democratic party in Cook 
county for many years. 

Soon after the United States declared war against Germany in 1917. Mr. 
Matousek enlisted at Chicago in the service of his country. He was assigned 
to Camp Joseph E. Johnston in Jacksonville, Florida, was assigned to In- 
structors Co. No. 5 and remained in the quartermaster's corps there until he 
was honorably discharged January 3, 191!). Mr. Matousek is now a member 
of the Cicero Post of the American Legion. He is a member of Delta Sigma 
Phi, a literary fraternity, and Phi Alpha Delta, a legal fraternity. 



MITCHELL C. ROBIN 



Mitchell C. Robin, who for the last eight years has served as clerk of the 
probate court of Cook county, was born in the city of Chicago, September 1, 
1891. He attended the Washburne grammar school and the Medill high school, 
and he has spent his entire life in Cook county. During the administration of 
William E. Dever. lie was a member of the board of local improvements, in which 
position he served for four years. 

When Mr. Robin became the democratic candidate for clerk of the probate 
court, he had the unqualified endorsement of all major civic organizations and 
every newspaper in Chicago. During his eight years of service, he has not been 
engaged in any other business or occupation, as it is, and has been, his belief 
that those holding public office should devote all of their time and energy to the 
demands and requirements of the office, and in this way assure good service to 
the public. 

Although tlie clerk of the probate court has the appointive powers of the 
assistant judges, Mr. Robin has been steadfast in his position — that no assistant 
judge would be appointed without the endorsement of Henry Horner and John 
F. O'Connell, the judges of the probate court under whom he has served. In 
the conduct of this office lie has consistently advised with Judge Horner ami 
Judge O'Connell, so that he could receive the benefit of the probate judges' ex- 
perience and ideas. Mr. Robin has inaugurated a number of important innova- 
tions in his office, among them being monthly courtesy meetings at which problems 
of this office are discussed with his employes, so that they may realize the work- 
ings of the entire office with a view of making them understand how their indi- 
vidual tasks ultimately create an efficient organization in its contagl with the 
general public. 

When the legislature was presented with a bill to make possible the probating 
of estates less than five hundred dollars in amount through banks. Mr. Robin 
realized that this would result in great saving of time, worry and effort to widows 
and children and exerted every effort to make possible the enactmenl of such 



94 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

legislation, which is now in effect. He has also been especially interested in those 
cases involving soldiers and sailors of the World war either as insane cases, 
feeble minded Or to settle the estates of those deceased. 

Mr. Robin lias been very active ill child welfare work- and the Boy Scouts 
movement and is a member of I the Covenanl Club, Chicago Cham her of Commerce, 
Masons, Elks, Loyal Order of .Moose, Knights of Pythias, as well as the Art 
Institute and similar civic institutions. These connections indicate clearly the 
nature of his activities and the rules that govern his conduct, showing his deep 
interest in those things which are an uplifting force in the life of the individual 
or the community at large. If his record can be expressed in two words, those 
words would be justice and progress. 



.JOHN PEMBERTON 



John Pemberton, who is most closely associated with democratic politics 
as chairman of the county central committee of .Mason county, makes his home 
in Forest City. He was born on the bluffs of Spring Lake, (formerly known as 
Spring Lake or Durang) not many miles from his present home, November 10, 
1863. His parents were George W. and Susan A. (Rochester) Pemberton, the 
former a native of Tennessee and the latter of Indiana, both coming with their 
respective parents to Illinois. George W. Pemberton was a soldier of the Civil 
war. During his active career he engaged in the grocery and grain business 
in Forest City, where the family located in 1871. In later years he discontinued 
the "rain trade hut carried on the grocery business in order to he occupied. It 
was in 1893 that he retired from the grain trade, and he passed away in 1899, at 
the age of fifty-eight years. He had long given stalwart support to the demo- 
cratic party. His widow survived him for some time, passing away at Clarkston, 
Washington, about 19'2'2, when seventy-seven years of age. 

John Pemberton spent his boyhood and youth under the parental roof and 

1 ame associated with his father in the grain business, in which he continued 

alone after the latter's retirement. He has bought grain for various companies 
and for forty-five years was with the McFadden Company, while at the present 
time he is buying for the Turner-IIudnut Company. In IS!)!) he aided in onjan- 
izing the Forest City State Bank, of which he was the president until July, 1934, 
when it paid its depositors in full and the business was absorbed by the Peoples 
State Lank of Manito. He is likewise interested in farm lands in Iowa and 
Illinois, his holdings aggregating eight hundred and fifty acres. He displays 
close application and unfaltering enterprise and carries forward to successful 
completion whatever he undertakes. 

By his first marriage, in 1890, to .Miss Katherine Graff, .Mr. Pemberton has 
a daughter, .Mrs. Vera Herman, of Forest City, who has two daughters, Doris and 
Feme. In 1906 he marred Miss Margaret E. Kiesling, of Forest City township, 
.Mason county, Illinois. He is well known through his fraternal connections and 
has membership with the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He became a charter member of the local Knights of Pythias lodge 
and received its gold medal after twenty-five years' association therewith. He was 
also a charter member of Forest City Camp, Xo. 112.'!, M. W. A. He also belongs 
to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained the thirty-second degree of 
the Scottish Rite, being a member of Peoria Consistory, and he formerly be- 
longed to the .Mystic Shrine in that city. lie has always been deeply interested 
in local welfare and progress, taking prominent part in promoting many move- 
ments which have pi-oven of great value to this district. He was chairman of 
the committee that was instrumental in saving the railroad built through Forest 
( !ity by inducing the ( JhicagO & Illinois Midland to take over the old C. P. & St. L. 
property, and he was a member of a committee that made a trip to Washington, 
I). C, to get a permit for the WENR radio station, in which task they succeeded. 
< >n attaining his majority Mr. Pemberton became a member of the Mason county 
democratic committee and has since served as county committeeman save for a 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 95 

period of one year, lie is now chairman of the county central committee, having 
been appointed to succeed A. D. Cullinane, while later he was elected to the 
office. He also served as postmaster of Forest City during both the first and 
second administrations of President Cleveland and he has done active and effec- 
tive work in organizing the forces of the democratic party in his county, in 
getting out the vote and in winning victories for the democratic candidates. For 
more than thirty years he has been treasurer of the Forest City school district 
which comprises Town 22, Range 6. For the last thirty years he has been a 
delegate to the judicial and state conventions and is well known to democracy 
over the state. 



JOHN A. FOIL 



Among the men who have held public office in Pana and whose records 
are regarded as most creditable is numbered John A. Foil, who is now serving 
as justice of the peace and as clerk of the city court. He has made his home 
in Pana since March, 1889, or for a period of forty-five years, and is most widely 
and favorably known here. His birth occurred on a farm near Concord, North 
Carolina, February 21, 1872. His father settled in Montgomery county, Illinois, 
while subsequently he removed to Pana, where he was employed as a cabinet- 
maker by the Big Four Railroad, continuing to act in that capacity for many 
years. He passed away in Taylorville, Illinois, about 1927, while the mother 
of John A. Foil died in North Carolina. 

When a youth of seventeen years John A. Foil left his native state and 
came to Illinois, where he joined his father. He had previously attended the 
public schools of North Carolina and afterward was a student in Catawba College 
at Newton, that state, for two and one-half years. He has continuously made 
his home in Pana for four and one-half decades and was first employed here 
by the Western Union Telegraph Company for about a year. He was then 
made manager for the company at Hillsboro but after a brief period returned 
to Pana and worked as extra man for the Big Four Railroad for about one year, 
after which he secured a position with the Singer Sewing Machine Company, 
acting as a salesman for a year. He was then called home to become manager 
for the Postal Telegraph Company on the 18th of June, 1896, and acted in 
that capacity for twelve years. At the same time he was township clerk for 
about six years and was next elected circuit clerk of Christian county, a position 
which he filled most creditably for twelve years. On retiring from office he 
entered the employ of the Pana Coal Company, which operated mines in Pana, 
acting as top ca<*er for eight years. During the last six years of that period 
he also served as supervisor of Pana township, and when the clerk of the city 
court of Pana passed away, Mr. Foil was appointed to serve out the unexpired 
term, of two years. At the end of that period he was elected for the four-year 
term and at the succeeding election was chosen for the office for a six-year term, 
so that when his present term expires he will have served altogether for twelve 
years. When with the Pana Coal Company he began writing insurance and 
also handling real estate, and he yet operates in this field to some extent, 
although allowing nothing to interfere with the faithful performance of his 
duties as a public official. He has again and again been called to office, which 
is indicative of the confidence reposed in him by his fellow townsmen and his 
loyalty to the interests entrusted to his care. On the 1st of April, 1930, he was 
elected justice of the peace and in the same year he was also again elected clerk 
(if the city court. He is systematic and methodical in the performance of his 
duties and his record is regarded as a most commendable one. In politics he 
has always been a democrat and has been secretary of the Christian county 
central committee. 

On the 26th of July, 1894, Mr. Foil was married to Miss Myra E. Turren- 
tene, a daughter of C. P. and Susan Turrentene, of Pana, where the wedding 



96 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

\v;is celebrated. The children of this marriage are : Frank A., who married Hattie 
Hotter, of Pana; Paul I)., who wedded Edith Carpenter, of Pana; Sid L., who 
married Adelaide Phipps, of Shelby county; Susan L., at borne; and Charles 
Frederick, who first married Grace German, of Pana, and later Stella Mitchell 
of Pana. Mr. and Mrs. Foil and their children support the democratic party, 
giving active and earnest allegiance thereto. Mr. Foil belongs to the Elks lodge 
and the Odd Fellows lodge of Pana and he attends the German Evangelical 
Church. His has been an active, useful and well spent life and there are few 
men of Pana more widely known, while none are held in warmer esteem by a 
large circle of friends. 



ALEXANDER FREDERICK REICHMANN 

Alexander Frederick Reichmann, a member of the Chicago bar who has 
practiced continuously in this city for almost four decades, was a delegate to 
the national convention of the democratic party in 1912 and has always been a 
consistent party supporter. Mr. Reichmann is a native of Dubuque, Iowa. He 
was born .Inly 23, 1868, a son of Alexander and Theresa Reichmann, the former 
a Union soldier who was with the Army of the Potomac during the Civil war. 
The son completed his public school education as a bigh school student at Le 
Mars, Iowa, and then entered Sacred Heart College at Prairie du Chien, Wis 
consin. After the completion of his more specifically literary course he prepared 
for the bar at the University of Michigan and was graduated in 1888, at which 
time the LL. B. degree was conferred upon him. He has been admitted to 
practice at the bars of Iowa and of Illinois and followed his profession in his 
native state for seven years after his graduation, on the expiration of which 
period he removed to Chicago in 1895 and for thirty-nine years has practiced 
here with continuous success, gaining a creditable position among the well known 
and leading representatives of his calling in this city. 

On the 3d of June, 1897, in Decora h, Iowa, Mr. Reichmann was married to 
Miss Edith Cheever Dent and they have a daughter and a son, Harriet Reich- 
mann Forrest and William Dent Reichmann. Outside of his professional activi- 
ties, the nature of Mi-. Reichmann 's interests is well indicated in his club and 
other connections. He is a member of the University Club of Chicago, the Chicago 
Literary Club, the Caxton Club of Chicago, the Iroquois Club of Chicago, the 
Attic, of Chicago, and the Barrington Hills Country Club. He has a membership 
in the Episcopal Church and his activities have been intelligently directed into 
those channels through which flows the greatest good to the greatest number. 
In early manhood, while still a resident of Iowa, he was active in democratic 
political organizations and after coming to Chicago became allied with the 
Iroquois Club, the strongest and most prominent organization of the kind in the 
metropolis. He occupied the presidency of the club in 19112-1:! and in the year 
of his election to that office was also made a delegate to the national convention 
of his party which in that year met in Baltimore. He also took a helpful and 
prominent part in support of Woodrow Wilson during the campaign of 1912 
and has always remained an unfaltering and loyal supporter of the party, while 
at the same time concentrating the major part of his time and attention upon 
his professional interests, which have brought him to an outstanding position 
at tlie Chicago bar. 

BEN BLUM 

Among the supporters of democracy in Pulaski county who are holding 
public office is numbered Pen Plum, of Mound City, who is serving as state 
food and dairy inspector. He was born in Mound City, November 12, 1879, 
a son of Louis and Sophie (Ilirsch) Blum, both of whom were natives of Ger- 
many. The father came to the United States prior to the Civil war and was 
married in New York, whence he and his wife came to Illinois, settling in Cairo 
in the middle part of the nineteenth century. They afterward removed to 




ALEXANDER P. REICILMANN 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 99 

Mound City, where Mr. Blum established a general merchandise store. He 
prospered as the years passed and became the owner of about two thousand 
acres of land in this section of the state. His death occurred when he had reached 
the age of seventy-four years and his wife passed away when about forty years 
of age. They were the parents of six children, two of whom are deceased. In 
order of birth they were as follows: Arthur, Clara, J. J., Samuel, Tudie and 
Hen. 

The grade schools of Mound City afforded Ben Blum his educational oppor- 
tunities and after his school days were over he became assistant to his father in 
the store. Following his father's death he conducted business on his own ac- 
count, handling men's clothing and general merchandise, and became one of 
the leading representatives of mercantile interests in Pulaski county, carrying 
on the business until 1933, when he was appointed food and dairy inspector for 
the twenty-third, twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth districts. This position he 
still fills and the promptness and faithfulness with which he discharges his 
duties have made for him a creditable record. 

The Blum family has always supported the democratic party and Ben Blum 
cast his first presidential vote for Bryan. For one term he was city treasurer 
and he is now the president of the Jeffersonian Club of his precinct. He owns 
a hall at Mound City which he donates to the party for all occasions, and during 
the campaign of 1932 he visited every town in Pulaski county, being escorted 
by members of the party of Mound City. His wife is also active in party work 
and is a member of the woman's organization. 

It was in 1909 that Mr. Blum wedded Miss Nellie Schwab, of Paducah, 
Kentucky, daughter of M. and Tressie (Heyman) Schwab, who are stalwart 
supporters of the democratic party. Mr. and Mrs. Blum are the parents of a 
daughter, Tessie, who was graduated from the schools of Mound City in 1931 
and is now a student at the Southern Illinois State Normal University in 
Carbondale. She is to begin teaching at Mounds in the fall of 1034. 

Mr. Blum belongs to Mound City Lodge, A. F. & A. M., to the Royal Arch 
chapter of Cairo, to the White Shrine, the Eastern Star and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks at Cairo. His wife is a member of the Eastern 
Star and the White Shrine, and they occupy an enviable position in fraternal 
and social circles, while the number of their friends in Pulaski county is 
extensive. 



PHILIP G. BARRON 



Philip G. Barron, who in October. 1933, was appointed acting postmaster 
of Duquoin, and commissioned April 28, 1934, in which position he is still 
serving, was born June 29, 1893, in the city which is still his home. His 
father, Charles Barron, who was born in Duquoin, Illinois, March 13, 1865, 
was the sou of a Civil war veteran who gave his political endorsement to the 
republican party. Charles Barron, however, became a stalwart democrat and 
never faltered in his allegiance to the party nor in his support of its candidates, 
although he never sought office for himself. His business activity was in the 
field of coal mining. He married Sophia Hempler, who was born in Baltimore, 
Maryland, a daughter of Philip Hempler, who was a miner and was one of the 
Civil war veterans of southern Illinois who were captured and sent to Ander- 
sonville prison, where he died. 

Philip G. Barron attended the public schools of Duquoin, including the 
high school, and started out in business as a reporter for the Duquoin Herald, 
in which capacity he served for a year. During the succeeding two years he 
held various clerical jobs with the Illinois Central System and then spent 
twenty years as chief clerk and cashier with the Crerar-Clinch Coal Company 
of Duquoin, thus continuing to serve until October 10, 1933, when he was 
appointed acting postmaster, in which capacity he continues to the present, his 
commission having been received April 28, 1934. Like his father, he is a 



100 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

supporter of the democratic party and has served us chairman of the Perry 
county centra] committee, lie is also secretary of the Perry County Jeffer- 
sonian Club and is precinct committeeman of Precinct No. 1 of Duquoin. 
His activities and interests cover a wide range and at all times his progressive 
and loyal citizenship is manifest. He works for community interests as a 
member and director of the Chamber of Commerce and he is much inter- 
ested in all kinds of athletics and all phases of outdoor life. In 1933 he 
managed the Crerar-Clinch Coal Company baseball team, and he is treasurer 
of the Majestic Fishing and Hunting Club and vice president of the Duquoin 
Field Trial Association. 

On the 23d of October, 1915, Mr. Barron was married to Golda V. Johnson, 
a native of Perry county, Illinois, and a daughter of Joe E. and May Johnson. 
.Mrs. Barron is a member of the Baptist church and that she is vitally interested 
in politics is shown in the fact that she is now secretary and treasurer of the 
Perry County Democratic Women's Club. Mi 1 , and Mrs. Barron have one son, 
Philip V. Barron. 

ELIJAH A. WEBB 

In preparing a history of Illinois Democracy we are permitted to in- 
corporate the life story of Elijah A. Webb, who has served his party in various 
public offices, always with ability, but who is perhaps even more widely known, 
in fact has an international reputation, as a breeder of Barred Rock poultry. 
His shipments have been made to all parts of the country and his name is 
a familiar one to many poultrymen across the water. 

For many decades the Webb family has been represented in Franklin 
county, where Eli Webb was born in 1853. He devoted his life to school teach- 
ing, to farming and to merchandising. In politics he was a stanch democrat 
and held various political offices in his township. He was always very active 
in Masonry, exemplifying in his life the beneficient spirit of the craft, and 
for twenty years he held the office of clerk in the local camp of the Modern 
Woodman. He married Julia Harriss, who was born in Perry county, Illinois, 
a daughter of the Rev. Joe Harriss, a well known preacher of the Primitive 
Baptist ( Ihurch, as was also the paternal grandfather of Mr. Webb. The political 
endorsement of both the Webb and Harriss families was given to the democratic 
party. 

Elijah A. Webb was born in Franklin county in 1881, attended the public 
schools and afterward studied for a time in Ewing College. He then established 
a harness and implement business on his own account in Ewing when twenty- 
three years of age, conducting his store from 1904 until 1915. He afterward 
engaged in farming near Ewing until 1920, when he removed to Mulkeytown. 
The same year he was elected a member of the county board of supervisors 
and gave splendid account of his loyalty in matters of citizenship by the prompt 
and faithful manner in which he discharged the duties of that position. He 
was elected chairman of the board in 1923. Three years later he was appointed 
county superintendent of highways for a six years' term and was reappointed 
in 1932 so that he is still the incumbent in the office. He carefully looks after 
the interests of the public in the matter of good roads and his work has won 
him high commendation. His chief source of income, however, has been the 
breeding and sale of Barred Rock poultry and he enjoys the distinction of 
having been the originator of a breed of Blue Wave Barred Rocks, a breed 
that has made him known not only nationally but also internationally. For a 
decade he was a director of the Illinois State Poultry Association and he has 
served as state inspector of poultry. He is also a life member of the American 
Poultry Association and is a licensed judge of poultry. 

Mr. Webb was married in 1904 to Adda E. Martin, a native of Franklin 
county, Illinois, and a daughter of S. A. I). and Leana (Browning) Martin. 
Her mother was a member of the well known Browning family, prominent in 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 101 

farming circles in Franklin county. Mrs. Webb died in 1918. The following 
year Mr. Webb wedded Grace E. Silkwood, who was born in Mulkeytown, 
Illinois, and she also comes from one of the pioneer democratic families of 
Franklin comity, and they have become parents of two children, Kathryn and 
Elijah Morris. Mr. Webb is a Mason and a Modern Woodman, well known 
in these orders because of his faithfulness to their teachings and purposes. 
However, he devotes much of his time and attention to his poultry inter* sis 
and enjoys well deserved fame in this connection. 

LOUIS J. VEXEGONI 

The name of Louis J. Venegoni, of Herrin, indicates his Italian ancestry. 
His father, Charles Venegoni, was born in Cnggiono, Italy, whence he came 
to the new world, arriving in America on the 5th of Jnne, 1892. He was a 
coal miner and' made his home in Mnrphysboro, Illinois, where he settled on 
his arrival in the United States. It was there he married Louise Bazzetta. also 
a native of Italy, who came to this country in 1894. 

Their son, Lonis J. Venegoni, was born in Mnrphysboro, Jackson county, 
Illinois, December 1, 1898, and he largely acquired his education in the grade 
and high schools of Herrin. Starting out in the business world, his first job 
was that of printer's devil on the Herrin Daily Journal, obtaining a position 
there in 1913. He remained in the office until 1921, winning various promotions 
and gaining an intimate and accurate knowledge of every phase of the printer's 
ai't. In the latter year he resigned and established a printing business on his 
own account, which he still conducts, making it a well managed and profitable 
enterprise. 

On the 19th of February, 1925, Mr. Venegoni was married in Herrin to 
Miss Bertha Bagdonas, who was born in Puritan, Pennsylvania, and is a rep- 
resentative of a family that has always given support to the democratic party. 
Mr. and Mrs. Venegoni have one son, Louis J., Jr. 

Mr. Venegoni belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
the Knights of Columbus and the International Typographical Union. Outside 
of business his activity chiefly centers in politics and he has always voted the 
democratic ticket since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He 
served as inheritance tax investigator in 1931 and 1932 and was alderman of 
Herrin in 1926 and 1927. In the latter year he entered upon a two years' term 
as chairman of the board of health of Herrin. He is now serving as precinct 
committeeman, for which office he was chosen in 1!)32 for a two years' term, 
and is a candidate for reelection. He is also filling the office of special agent for 
the Illinois Liquor Control Commission. 



FRAXK HESLER 



Frank Hesler, a resident of Greenup who is maintenance foreman for 
District Xo. 5, was born in Jasper county, Illinois, .May 25. 1889, his parents 
being William and Laura E. (Wharton) Hesler, natives of Indiana ami Ohio, 
respectively. The father came to Illinois in 1875, settling first in Dnndas, 
Richland county, while subsequently he moved to Jasper county, where he 
followed farming to the time of his death on the 5th of March, 1928. In 
politics he was a stanch democrat who gave loyal support to the entire party 
ticket. He had survived his wife for a decade, her death having occurred 
July 7, 1918. 

Frank Hesler acquired his education in the grade and high schools of 
Greenup and for five years after leaving school he followed mechanical pur- 
suits in automobile shops of Colorado and Michigan Returning to Greenup, 
he established a garage business on his own account and conducted it until 
April 7, 1933, when he was appointed by Governor Horner to the position of 
maintenance foreman of District No. 5. He has been active in democratic 
politics since attaining his majority ami was made committeeman of Precinct 



102 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

No. 1 of Greenup in 1922. since which time he Inis continuously served in this 
capacity. Be was elected chairman of the Cumberland county democratic cen- 
tral committee in 1930 and served until 19:54, directing the activities of the 

party and shaping its policy during that tour-year period. He has attended 
many state, congressional and judicial conventions and his opinions carry 
weight among party leaders in his section of the state. 

In 1913 Mr. Hesler married Edna Stewart, who passed away in 1917, 
leaving a daughter, Myrna N. In 1!)20 Mr. Hesler wedded Lillian Gaddis, of 
.Macon county, and to them have been born six children, namely: Conrad W., 
Kenneth. Frank, Jr., William (J., Rosemary and Wanda Jean. Mr. Hesler be- 
longs to the Masonic fraternity and gives loyal support to the organization, 
believing firmly in its principles. He has many sterling traits of character 
which gain for him warm regard, and he has a wide acquaintance in this part 
of the state, where his friends are many. 



GOTTLIEB JAMES PRICK 

Gottlieb •lames Prick, truly a self-made man in the best accepted sense of 
that term, makes his home in Marion, and is serving as county sheriff of Wil- 
liamson county. He has been a lifelong resident of Illinois, his birth having 
occurred in Franklin county, April 18, 1881, and he is a son of George A. and 
Anna (Sipple) Frick. The father's birth occurred near Red Bud, Illinois, in 
1844, and he has followed farming and carpentering as a life work. The demo- 
cratic party has always received his endorsement at the polls and he has held 
some minor offices in Franklin county. His wife was born in West Virginia 
and during her girlhood was brought by her family to this state, the trip being 
made by ox team. They settled near Red Bud, where her father followed farm- 
ing, and he also gave his support to the democratic party. 

Gottlieb J. Frick attended the public schools of Marion and for three years 
was a pupil in a German school, but his educational opportunities were somewhat 
limited, as necessity forced him to earn his own living when he was quite young. 
At the age of fifteen years he began working as a railway section hand for ninety- 
nine cents per day. Later he was employed in a general store in Belleville 
for two years, at the end of which time he went to Granite City, where he worked 
on street cars and in various stores until 190:5. In that year he married Miss 
Pearl Wilbanks, a representative of a well known family of Jefferson county. 

Mr. Frick and his brother about that time opened a grocery store in Venice, 
where he remained for about a year, and later removed to Johnston City, Wil- 
liamson county, being employed in the coal mines until 1910. In that year he 
removed to New Mexico and homesteaded land near the town of Kenna, whereon 
he resided for fourteen months, lie afterward spent two years as a street rail- 
way employe in El Paso, Texas, but in 1913 returned to Marion, Illinois, where 
he worked in the mines for two years. He afterward owned and conducted a 
grocery store for seven or eight years and then spent two years in the under- 
taking business in partnership with E. T. Hudgens, at the end of which time he 
sold out. Two months later, however, he reentered the undertaking business 
independently and is today well known as a funeral director in Marion. 

Fraternally Mr. Frick is affiliated with various Masonic bodies, including 
the Eastern Star, and he is also a member of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Knights of Pythias, the 
Loyal Order of Moose and the Improved Order of Red Men. He likewise belongs 
in the Lutheran Evangelical Church, while his wife is a member of the Presby- 
terian Church. Their family numbers four children: Irene, now the wife of 
C. Duncan, a resident of Chicago; Howard, who is now attending the St. Louis 
University Institute of Law, after having spent four and one-half years in the 
University of Illinois; James A., a high school pupil in Marion; and William 
Douglas. 

Mr. Frick's chief interest aside from business has been in the field of 




GOTTLIEB JAMES FKK'K 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 105 

politics and he has ever been a stalwart democrat. In 1917 he was elected city 
commissioner of Marion and again in 1926. In 1930 he was elected sheriff for 
a four years' term in a county which normally gives a republican majority of 
five thousand, but he ran far ahead of his ticket, winning election by a vote of 
six thousand majority over the republican candidate. Moreover, he has the 
distinction of being the first democrat sheriff in Williamson county for twenty- 
four years, and in the discharge of his official duties he has fully measured up 
to the high standards of the office and to the confidence reposed in him, as 
shown by the extremely large vote that was accorded him. In April, 1934, 
he became the democratic candidate for county clerk. He has always led a 
very busy life and his activities have resulted in steady advancement, while 
his devotion to the public welfare has been manifest in many tangible ways. 



W. ZOLL1E CARTER 



The democratic party acknowledged the qualities of leadership in W. 
Zollie Carter, of Herrin. and his fitness for office by nominating him for sheriff 
of Williamson comity in 1934. He had previously been on the police force 
and had acted as chief of police, a training well qualifying him for the duties 
of the higher position. His birth occurred near Herrin, Williamson county. 
June 11, 1898. His father, W. Jasper Carter, was born in Xenia, Clay county. 
Illinois, in 1874 and has devoted his active life to mining and farming. He 
has always been a democrat, loyally supporting the interests and principles 
of the party yet neither seeking nor desiring office for himself. He married 
Eva Johnson, who was born in Franklin county, a daughter of John Harvey 
Johnson, a farmer. 

At the usual age, W. Zollie Carter entered the public schools of Herrin, 
passing through consecutive grades until he had completed a year's work in 
the high school. He then secured a position as bottom eager in the coal mines 
and served in that capacity for fifteen years, when he assumed public duties, 
having been appointed a member of the Herrin police force in 1932. The 
following year he was made chief of police and so excellent has been his record 
in maintaining order and promoting public safety that in April, 1934, he became 
the democratic candidate for the office of sheriff. He is a man of imposing 
physioue, standing six feet and four inches in height and weighing two hundred 
and fifty pounds. 

On the 24th of December, 1933, Mr. Carter was married to Eulah Webb, 
of Creal Springs, Illinois, a daughter of Sylvester Webb, a farmer, who belongs 
to one of the most stalwart democratic families of Williamson county and who 
has always been a stanch party advocate. Mr. Carter has membership in the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Improved Order of Red Men. 
He holds to high ideals of citizenship and of public service and his record has 
gained him warm commendation. 

MAJOR T. FLOWERREE 

Major T. Flowerree, of Easton, Illinois, has to his credit many years of 
activity in democratic circles, his earnest support of and work for the parly having 
produced substantial results. He is now chairman of the Mason comity board 
of supervisors and his business interests center in agriculture. lie was born 
December 27, 1889, on the farm in Crane Creek township. Mason county, which 
he still owns and occupies, being a son of William II. and Sarah F. (Duckett) 
Flowerree, natives of Virginia and Illinois, respectively. The father was a 
farmer and live stock breeder and was a stalwart democrat. Roth he and his 
wife have passed away. A. W. Duckett, the maternal grandfather of Major T. 
Flowerree, was also an earnest worker in democratic circles and held a number 
of local offices, while the cause of education benefited by his service as a school 
director. 

Major T. Flowrree mastered the elementary branches of learning in the 



106 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

rural schools of .Mason county, afterward attended high school in Havana and 
then entered the University of Illinois, in which he continued his studies for seven 
yearSj winning both the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Master of Science 
in the College of Agriculture. In early manhood lie took up the profession of 
teaching, which he followed for ten years both in the grades and in high schools, 
spending the greater part of the period in Mason county. He was, however, for 
a time a teacher in Minnesota. He is now giving his attention to agricultural 
pursuits, to tlie grain trade and to the live stock business, and for fifteen years 
He has been an active worker in the Farm Bureau. In fact he is one of the 
prominent representatives of agricultural interests in this part of the state. 

Mr. Plowerree has a military chapter in his life record, for he enlisted for 
service in the World war with the Thirty-first Division with which he sailed to 
England, where he became ill with influenza and was sent back to the United 
States. He is now an active member of the American Legion. His political 
endorsement has always been given to the democratic party and he has been 
precinct committeeman and a member of the local caucus committee. He has 
also served as a school director and the cause of education finds in him a stal- 
wart champion, as dues every measure that is calculated to promote the public 
good. He is chairman of the Mason county board of supervisors and was a 
democratic candidate for the office of representative in the 1934 primary from the 
thirtieth senatorial district. He is also chairman of the Mason County Wheat 
Production Control Association and his broad experience in operating a five- 
hundred acre farm well qualifies him for his work in this connection. He 
thoroughly knows agriculture from both the technical and practical standpoints 
and has done much to further the interests and welfare of the farmers in central 
Illinois. 



V. R. FELLEPS 



V. P. Fellers, assistant manager for the American Radiator Company at 
Litchfield, was born in this city May (i, 1891, a son of J. Peter and Luella (Pea | 
Fellers, also natives of Illinois. The father passed away October 25, 1900, but 
the mother still makes her home in Litchfield. 

V. P. Fellers, who was one of a family of two sons, obtained his education 
in the grade and high schools of Litchfield, pursuing his high school course for 
three years, after which he was a student in the Litchfield Business College for 
a year. He then entered the employ of the American Radiator Company as a 
bookkeeper and his capability and fidelity are indicated in the fact that he is 
still with the corporation. Steadily he has made his way upward, winning pro- 
motions through merit until he is now occupying the responsible position of 
assistant manager, with a considerable force of employes under his control. 

On the 3d of June, 1913, Mr. Fellers was married to Miss Elizabeth Irene 
Campbell, a daughter of A. B. and Catherine (Haley) Campbell. Her father 
is a foreman at the plant of the American Radiator Company. Mrs. Fellers is 
one of a family of three children, her brothers being Joseph and Thomas Camp- 
bell. To Mr. and Mrs. Fellers has been born a son, Francis Tal, who is a graduate 
of the Litchfield high school and is now making a study of chemistry in the 
laboratory of the American Radiator Company. Mr. Fellers attends the Baptist 
Ghurch, while Mrs. Fellers is a Catholic. He belongs to Elks Lodge No. 654 
al Litchfield, to Litchfield Lodge No. 1634, L. 0. 0. M., and to the Antlers Club. 
His social qualities make for friendship, while his business ability has gained 
him high place in the business circles of his native city. As to his political 
affiliation no one need ever question his views. He comes of old democratic 
families in both the paternal and maternal lines and has never wavered in his 
loyalty to the party, for which he has consistently worked as opportunity has 
offered. He has been a delegate to state conventions and four terms was pre- 
cinct committeeman. He was elected city treasurer about l!l'_'4, filling the office 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 107 

for one term, and he is a trustee of the Litchfield Democratic Club, while of 
the Montgomery county central committee he is now secretary. In this respect 
he is doing much to shape the policy of the party in the county and he is a 
recognized leader in the democratic fold. 



HON. JOHN DAY, JR. 

Hon. John Day, Jr., of Hamburg, who has long been connected with farming 
interests in Calhoun county and who has filled various political positions here, 
having again and again been chosen for the office of county judge, was born 
November 2, 1872, near the city in which he still makes his home. His father, 
Bartholomew Day, a native of Ireland, was born May 20, 1829, and died Septem- 
ber 6, 1908. He had come to America in 1868, taking up his abode at Hamburg, 
Illinois, after which he devoted his remaining days to farming. In politics he 
was a stanch democrat and in religious faith a Catholic. In December, 1870, he 
married Miss Marv Lvnch, who was born in Ireland, April 16, 184N, and departed 
this life April 20,* 1928. 

John Day attended the public schools of Hamburg and continued his educa- 
tion in the Whipple Academy of Jacksonville, the Western Normal at Bushnell, 
Illinois, and the Western Illinois State Teachers College at Macomb. He then 
taught school for seven years as principal in Hamburg and did much to further 
the educational interests of the city by reason of the high standards which he 
always maintained. From an early age he was interested in politics and has 
always kept well informed on the questions and issues of the day, being ever 
ready to support his position by intelligent argument. A recognition of his 
ability on the part of his fellow townsmen led to his election to the office of 
county clerk of Calhoun county in 1906 and after a four years' term he was re- 
elected without opposition in 1910. In 1914 he was chosen county judge and was 
re-elected in 1918, 1922 and 1926. In 1934 he was once more made the democratic 
nominee for the office, and on the bench he has made a most creditable record, 
his decisions being strictly fair and impartial, his opinions being formed without 
personal bias and as a result of a comprehensive understanding of the law. 
His judicial opinions have never been reversed in sixteen years. His entire 
political record reflects honor and credit upon the party with which he is allied. 
In 1900 he attended the democratic national convention in Kansas City and 
in 1908 was a delegate to the state convention. Aside from his official duties 
he has other interests, being a well known horticulturist and owner of one of 
the large apple orchards of Calhoun county, comprising about one hundred 
acres. 

On the 7th of September, f!)04, Judge Day was married to Miss Addie M. 
Fowler and they have a family of three daughters and a son : Mary E., who is 
a graduate of Webster College of St. Louis and is now principal of the schools 
of Hamburg; Loretta M., who became the wife of Dr. P. A. Ritter and died 
April 8, 19:54; Catherine F., and John W. The religious faith of the family 
is that of the Catholic Church. 



ALBERT CLARENCE DILL 

Descended from an ancestry whose loyalty to the democratic party has 
always been an outstanding feature in the family history, Albert Clarence Hill 
of Mason City manifests the same spirit of fidelity to the principles which have 
been advocated by his forebears. He was born in Mason county, Illinois, Feb- 
ruary 4, 1892, a son of Thomas X. and Westaria C. (Benscoter) Hill, both of 
whom were reared in this state. The father was a lifelong resident of Salt 
Creek township, Mason county, and followed the occupation of farming through- 
out his active career. The mother slid survives. 

Albert C. Hill had the usual experiences of the farm-bred boy, dividing his 
time between the work of the schoolroom, the pleasures of the playground and the 
farm tasks that were assigned him by parental authority. After his textbooks 



108 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

were put aside he continued to follow farming until he entered the employ of the 
Awry Combine Company as their service man, traveling out of Peoria. For four 
years he occupied that position and on the 23d of -January, 1!):53, he became high- 
way maintenance patrolman. He was the first man to be cheeked in under the 
new regime in Illinois and he is now acting in this capacity, giving satisfactory 
service in the performance of his duties. He has always voted with the demo- 
cratic party and for twelve years has occupied the position of precinct committee- 
man. 

On the 2d of December, 1912, Mr. Hill was united in marriage to Miss Nida 
M. Shockey and they have one son, Duane Thomas. Mrs. Hill's people, like her 
husband's, were always active democrats and she, too, ever votes the party ticket. 
.Mi-. Hill belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and is well known through- 
out the county in which his entire life has been passed and where his course has 
ever been such as to commend him to the confidence and high regard of all with 
whom he has come in contact. 



HARRY J. COATES 



Harry J. Coates came to Marseilles in 1918 and has since made his home 
here. In February, 1933, he was appointed highway maintenance patrolman 
and is now filling this position. He was born in Peoria, Illinois, March 21, 
1903, and is a son of La Boyd and Margaret (Stack) Coates, both natives of 
Illinois, the latter now deceased, while the father is living in Chicago. 

Harry J. Coates was educated in the schools of Peoria and was a youth of 
fifteen years when he came to Marseilles, where he is now widely and favorably 
known, having lived here for sixteen years. He first worked as a paper maker, 
with the National Biscuit Company, following that pursuit until he was called 
to serve in his present position as highway maintenance patrolman. His record 
in office now covers more than a year and a half and is commended by his 
superior officers. He is secretary of the Young Peoples Democratic Club of 
Marseilles. 

In February, 1924, Mr. Coates was united in marriage to Irene McMahon 
and they are the parents of three children: Ronald, Richard and Beverly Ann. 
The religious faith of the family is that of Catholic Church and Mr. Coates is 
a member of the Loyal Order of Moose, serving as treasurer of the local lodge. 



BYFORD VAUGHN 



Byford Vaughn, deputy sheriff of Franklin county and a resident of Benton, 
was born in Ewing, this county, March 26, 1888. His father, John A. Vaughn. 
whose birth occurred in .Jefferson county, Illinois, in 1859, removed to Franklin 
county about 1880 and the period of his residence here was marked by great 
activity in support of the democratic party. For twenty-two years he filled 
the office of constable and from 1910 until 1914 was county sheriff. He had 
the distinction of being the only one who ever occupied that position who made 
the office pay its own way. As a means of livelihood he followed the occupation 
of farming, and death ended his labors in 1928. His wife, who in her maiden- 
hood was Mary Dunbar, was born in Jefferson county, this state, a daughter of 
Sidney Dunbar, a farmer. All of his family, like the Vaughn family, were 
adherents of the democratic faith. 

Byford Vaughn completed his education in Ewing College but did not 
graduate therefrom. His first political position was that of deputy sheriff under 
his father and he also served as deputy United States marshal under Cooper 
Stout until 1914. when illness compelled him to resign. While acting in that 
capacity be likewise served as constable for a time and for about five years was 
a member of the police force of Benton. When not in office he worked inter- 
mittently in the coal mines for thirteen years, covering the period from 1914 
until 1930. In the latter year he was a candidate for the office of sheriff but 
was defeated by Browning Robinson, under whom he became deputy sheriff and 




BYFORD VAUGHN 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 111 

is still acting in that capacity. However, in the primaries of 1934 he made the 
party candidate for sheriff, subject to the vote of the electorate in November. 

On the 25th of December, 1921, Mr. Vaughn was united in marriage to Miss 
Fannie Sue Kniffen, who was born in Belle Rive, Jefferson county, Illinois, a 
daughter of Charles and Minnie Kniffen. Her father was a conductor on the 
Louisville and Nashville Railroad and he voted with the democratic party. Mrs. 
Vaughn is a school teacher and took active part in assisting her husband in the 
primary campaign of April, 1934. At the time of her marriage Mrs. Vaughn 
was treasurer of the village of Belle Rive and assistant Postmaster there under 
her sister, Mrs. Mayme Ham. She is a member of both the county and town- 
ship Women's Democratic Club. She is also a past worthy matron of the order 
of the Eastern Star, past worthy high priestess of the White Shrine of Jeru- 
salem, past oracle of the Royal Neighbors and sponsor of the Girl Scout Troop, 
Xo. 1, of Benton, She belongs to the Methodist Church, while his religious con- 
nection is with the Baptist Church, and fraternally he is a Mason. While he 
makes his home in Benton, he owns a small farm and greatly enjoys cultivating 
the land. 



ARTHUR JOSEPH GAFFNEY 

Arthur Joseph Gaffney is a veteran of the World war and in matters of 
citizenship has always been most loyal to the best interests of the community 
in which he makes his home and of Illinois, his native state. He resides in 
Joliet, where he was born September 9, 1896, a son of James and Elizabeth 
(Rocker) Gaffney, who are still residents of Joliet. While spending his youth- 
ful days under the parental roof Arthur J. Gaffney attended the schools of his 
native city and afterward began learning the machinist's trade, which he 
followed continuously until May 1, 1933, when he became a bridge operator. 
In this capacity he served until the 1st of August, 1934, when he was promoted 
to the position of assistant chief operator of all the state bridges at Joliet. 
This is a position of great responsibility, but he is found adequate to his duties 
and is rendering a valuable service to the public in this connection. 

Mr. Gaffney 's World war experience began when he entered the naval 
service in April, 1917. He volunteered the Friday after the United States 
declared war, this happening to be on the 13th of the month, but the pro- 
verbial unlucky day had no terrors for Mr. Gaffney. He served on the steam- 
ships Ohio, South Carolina and Montana and was advanced to first-class 
machinist mate, receiving an honorable discharge September 1, 1919. He is a 
member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and thus maintains pleasant relations 
with his old military comrades. 

On June 27. 1927, Mr. Gaffney was united in marriage to Miss Edith 
Clcattera and they are the parents of two daughters, Betty Lou and Mary 
Ellen. The family attend the Sacred Heart Catholic Church. Since age con- 
ferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Gaffney has voted with the demo- 
cratic party, has long been recognized as one of its active workers in his native 
city and is now serving for the third term as precinct committeeman. What- 
ever he has achieved or accomplished in life is the direct outcome and reward 
of his persistent effort and capability. He has worked diligently in the per- 
formance of any duty that has devolved upon him and thus lie has advanced to 
his present responsibile position. 

MRS. CARRIE (PRINDLE) THOMAS 
Greatly interested in church and club work and in all thai pertains to the 
intellectual, cultural and moral progress of her community, Mrs. Carrie 
(Prindle) Thomas of Mounds is well known. At the present time she is taking 
an active part in state relief work. A native of Villa Ridge, Pulaski county, 
Illinois, she is a daughter of 1). W. and Lucy Prindle. Her father, who was 
a farmer and garage owner in Villa Ridge precinct, died in 191f>. but the 
mother survives and makes her home in Mounds. 



112 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Their daughter, Carrie Prindle, obtained her early education in the ele- 
mentary school at Villa Ridge, afterward continuing her studies in Mounds 
and at Cairo, Illinois, where, in 1016 she was graduated from the high school. 
She then entered the Southern Illinois State Normal University at Carhondale, 
from which she was graduated in 1918. For a year thereafter she taught in the 
Lincoln school at Carhondale and afterward spent one year as a teacher at 
.Mounds, followed by a three month's vacation in the west. In 1!)21 she 
entered the employ of the Langen Lumber Company as a bookkeeper and so 
continued for a decade or until January, 1931, since which time she has been 
actively interested in church and club work. She aided in organizing the 
Junior Women's Club at Mounds, which she has sponsored for five years, and 
sin- has been equally prominent in the Senior Women's Club, doing community 
work. On the 7th of April, 1934, she received appointment as case aid in the 
social service department, employed by the Illinois Emergency Relief Associa- 
tion, an organization that will eventually do much more social service work 
than at the present time. She is a woman of broad sympathy and marked 
humanitarian spirit and is constantly reaching out to aid those in distress. 
She has always voted with the democratic party and has belonged to the 
women's organization of Pulaski county for about twelve years. 

In 1925 Miss Prindle became the wife of Melvin Thomas, the proprietor 
of a barber shop in Mounds, who is now employed in Cairo. Mrs. Thomas is 
a member of the Eastern Star, of the Mounds Women's Club, of the Illinois 
State Teachers Association and of the Methodist Church. She has taken a 
most helpful interest in church work and taught a Sunday-school class for 
twelve years. While in Carhondale she did a form of social service work among 
the poor of that city. Her tact and understanding well qualify her for service of 
this character and her labors have brought help, benefit and hope to many, 
who entertain for her an undying sense of gratitude. 



FRANK CAMPBELL, I). 1). S. 

Dr. Frank Campbell, who became active in democratic politics even be- 
fore attaining his majority and who since 1932 has served as a member of the 
Lawrence county democratic central committee, is now practicing dentistry 
in Lawrenceville, where by reason of his professional skill and ability he has 
gained many patrons. Horn in Xenia, Clay county, Illinois, June 5, 1903. the 
doctor is a son of Frank C. and Georgia Campbell, who were natives of Dixon, 
Kentucky, and removed to Illinois in 1897, settling in Clay county. The father 
was a graduate of the University of Louisville School of Medicine, in Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, and became a prominent physician of Xenia, Illinois, where 
in addition to the practice of his profession he occupied the presidency of the 
Xenia State Bank. His ability as a business man and his prominence as a citi- 
zen led to his election to the office of state senator in 1912 and he remained a 
member of the upper house of the Illinois assembly through 1920. He was 
appointed by the governor as commissioner of the Panama-Pacific Exposition, 
held in San Francisco, California, in 1915, acting as the Illinois representative 
there. Throughout his county lie was a recognized leader in the democratic 
ranks and was prominently known to party workers throughout the state. He 
supported every measure for civic welfare and gave hearty allegiance to many 
plans for the benefit of town, county and commonwealth. He also served as a 
delegate to many of the state and national conventions of the democratic party 
and remained an active and honored resident of Illinois until his death in 1931. 

In the acquirement of his education Frank Campbell attended the gram- 
mar and high schools of Xenia and of Flora, Illinois. Later he entered the St. 
Louis College of Dentistry, the dental department of St. Louis University, and 
received his D. I). S. degree upon graduation with the class of June, 1927. He 
then opened an office in Flora, Illinois, where he continued in practice until 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 113 

1928, when he removed to Lawrenceville and opened his present office. In 
the intervening period of six years he has built up an excellent practice which 
is constantly growing in volume and importance. At all times he keeps in touch 
with the latest scientific discoveries affecting his professional work through 
his membership in the Wabash River Dental Association and the Illinois State 
and American Dental Associations. He belongs to the Psi Omega, a dental 
fraternity, and to the Reserve Officers Dental Corps. 

In 1927 Dr. Campbell was married to Miss Frances Stanford, a native of 
Clay county. Illinois, and they have one daughter. Suzanne, and one son, 
Frank (III). The doctor is a popular member of the Elks lodge and of the 
Rotary Club, and his interest in community welfare and progress is indicated 
in his membership in the local Chamber of Commerce. As above stated, he 
has been a member of the Lawrence county democratic central committee since 
1932, and he was one of the organizers of the Lawrence County Jeffersonian 
Club, of which he became the first secretary. He was a delegate to the demo- 
cratic state convention of 1932 and attends all congressional, judicial and 
county conventions of his party. 



ARNOLD V. SCOTT 



Arnold V. Scott, who has served as treasurer of the Adams county demo- 
cratic central committee since 1910, is actively engaged in business as the 
secretary and treasurer of the General Discount Corporation of Quincy, which 
he organized in association with Rolland M. Wagner in 1921. He was born at 
Camp Point, Adams county, Illinois, December 16, 1877, his parents being 
Winfield H. and Anna (Huber) Scott, the former born at Frederick, Illinois. 
January 1, 1847, and the latter at Quincy. this state, March 11, 1856. r lhe 
paternal grandparents of our subject were William and Eleanor (Meisenheimer) 
Scott, natives of Xenia, Ohio, and Anna, Illinois, respectively. William Scott 
served in the Florida war against the Seminole Indians when a youth of six- 
teen years. At the outbreak of the Civil war he organized his own company at 
Clayton, Illinois, and he served as captain in the Eighty-fourth Illinois Infantry 
until the cessation of hostilities. At the battle of Shiloh he sustained an arm 
wound. He devoted his attention to the milling business throughout his active 
career, and he was a stanch democrat in politics. Winrield II. Scott was asso- 
ciated with his father in milling until the business was sold in 1885. In 1891 
he removed to Quincy, Illinois, where he became a clothing clerk and made his 
home until his death, which occurred December 14, 1917. Fraternally he was 
affiliated with Camp Point Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
of which he served as noble grand, while his religious faith was that of the 
Presbyterian Church. To him and his wife, who passed away January 28, 
1908, were born three children, namely: Arnold V., of this review; Charles, 
who is deceased; and Bertha, who died at the age of ten years. 

Arnold V. Scott was educated at the Chaddock School for Boys at Quincy 
and was a youth of about eighteen years when on the 15th of October, 1895, 
he obtained employment as messenger boy with the State Savings Loan & 
Trust Company of Quincy. He remained in the service of the institution for a 
quarter of a century and had been advanced to the position of discount clerk 
when he severed his connection therewith in 1921. The same year, in association 
with Rolland M. Wagner, a well known attorney of Quincy, he organized the 
General Discount Corporation, the business of which he has since successfully 
conducted in the dual official capacity of secretary and treasurer. On the 1st 
of September, 1933, he was appointed receiver of the Quincy Ricker National 
Bank & Trust Company and on the 15th of December following was named 
receiver of the First National Bank of Plymouth, the First National Bank of 
Hamilton, the First National Bank of Augusta and the First National Bank 
of Mount Sterling, all in Illinois. Mr. Scott has been an active worker in the 
local ranks of the democratic party for twenty-five years and has served as 



1U ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

treasurer of the Adams county democratic central committee since 1910. In 
1!H;5 be was a candidate for county treasurer, but was unsuccessful in tbe 
primary running in a field of five, lie lias attended practically all state con- 
ventions of his party during the past quarter century, and be also attended 
the democratic national conventions at St. Louis in 1!)1(> and at Chicago in lilo'J. 
On the 21st of dune. 1913, Mr. Scott was muted in marriage to Agnes 
Hunt her, a daughter of Robert C. and Anna (Flebbe) Gunther. Mr. Scott is a 
past master of Bodley Lodge, No. 1, A. P. & A. M., of Quincy, and lias also 
attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in Masonry. He is like- 
wise a charter member and past exalted ruler of Quincy Lodge No. 100 of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. A lifelong resident of Adams 
county, he enjoys an extensive ami favorable acquaintance in this part of 
t he state. 



WILLIAM H. McALPIN 

William II. McAlpin, who since his appointment in 1!>:!4 has been acting as 
postmaster at Marion, was born in Clinton, North Carolina, September 24, 1872, 
a son of dames A. McAlpin, also a native of that state. The father devoted bis 
life to farming and was ever a stanch democrat but never an office seeker. In 
1876 he removed with his family to Williamson county, Illinois, and he passed 
away in a hospital at Carbondale at the age of seventy-four years. His religious 
faith was that of the Baptist Church, to which he gave loyal and earnest help. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Sarah Boney, was born in North Carolina, 
coming of a respected family of farmers who were also stalwart advocates of 
democracy. 

William H. McAlpin was largely reared in Williamson county, where he had 
hut meager school privileges, owing to the necessity of providing for his own 
support when quite young. He has been connected with coal mining during the 
greater part of his life and filled the position of mine manager for the West 
Virginia Coal Company at Marion for nineteen years or until 1 !>25. His asso- 
ciation with mining interests was continued until 1931, when he was appointed 
a member of the Marion police force, in which capacity he served for two years. 
He was then made doorman in the capitol at Washington, D. ('., and in 1933 lie 
became an official of the Civil Works Administration. His next political position 
was that of acting postmaster of Marion, to which he was appointed in 1934, 
and he is now administrating the affairs of the office in a prompt and business- 
like manner. 

In April, 1S!I7, in Williamson county. Mr. McAlpin was married to Miss 
Byrd Holland, a native of the same county. Her father, Jerome Holland, be- 
longed to a large family, all of whom gave stalwart allegiance to the democratic 
party. Jerome Holland followed the occupation of farming as a life work. To 
Mr. and Mrs. McAlpin have been horn six children: Glen, who is chief clerk in 
the coal mine at Dowell. Illinois; Baker, who is county manager for the Civil 
Work's Administration in Franklin county; Beulah, the wife of Russell Jacobs; 
Helen; .Mary .lane, the wife of Orville McMullin; and Isabel. Like the parents, 
all of the children are firm adherents of the teachings of democracy and never 
fail to respond to the call to register their belief at the ballot box. Mr. and Mrs. 
McAlpin are enrolled as members of the Baptist Church, and the former also 
belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



CLIFFORD II. BELL 



Clifford II. Bell, who makes his home in Decatur, is filling the office of 
county recorder of Macon county. His political allegiance has been given 
to the democratic party since he attained his majority and at various times he 
has 1 n called to serve in positions of public honor and trust. 

Born in Evansville, Indiana, March 30, 1891, Clifford II. Bell is a son of 
Barry II. and Laura C. (Blend) Bell. The father was horn in Pennsylvania 




WILLIAM II. McALPIN 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 117 

and was a brother of J. C. Bell, who was lieutenant governor of that state and 
a republican leader there. Harry H. Bell, removing westward to Illinois, became 
a jewelry salesman and followed the business for several years but since 1895 
has been engaged in the hotel business in Hot Springs, Arkansas. 

It was in the public schools of Hot Springs that Clifford H. Bell pursued his 
preliminary education. He attended high school and afterward entered the 
University of Arkansas, from which he was graduated in 1911, pursuing a 
course in electrical engineering. He was then active along that line of business 
until 1918, when he enlisted in the Motor Transport Division of the American 
Army, receiving his discharge in 1919 following the close of the war. He then 
went to St. Louis, Missouri, where he engaged in the insurance business until 
1920. In that year he came to Decatur, Illinois, where he engaged in the 
insurance business and also managed various mercantile stores until 1932, when 
lie was called to public office. He has always been an active democrat since 
attaining his majority and he served as commissioner of accounts in Arkansas. 
In 1932 he was elected county recorder of Macon county, Illinois, and is now 
discharging the duties of the position. He always supports the entire ticket 
and he attended the democratic national convention held in Chicago in 1932, 
when Franklin D. Roosevelt was nominated for the presidency. 

In 1920 Mr. Bell was united in marriage to Miss Eve B. Bolen, a native of 
Decatur, Illinois, and a daughter of Arthur O. and Emma (Braden) Bolen, the 
former being a prominent farmer of Macon county. Arthur O. Bolen has been 
an active worker in the local ranks of the democratic party, formed the first 
democratic organization in his township and was at one time a candidate for 
the office of circuit clerk. Mr. and Mrs. Bell are the parents of a son, Morrise. 
Like her husband, Mrs. Bell is an active democratic worker. Fraternally Mr. 
Bell is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and with 
the Masons. In the latter organization he has attained high rank and is now 
a member of Ansar Temple of the Mystic Shrine in Springfield. He also belongs 
to the American Legion, to the Illinois State Recorders Association and to the 
Illinois Service Democratic League. As a citizen he is alert, ready for any 
emergency and for any opportunity. He seeks progress and improvement at 
all times and his labors have been effective and valuable to the party 
organization. 



WILLIAM P. CARLTON 

William P. Carlton, postmaster at Oblong, was born in Martin township, 
Crawford county, Illinois, August 13, 1890, a son of Charles P. and Johanna 
(Hughes) Carlton. The father was a native of Ohio and came to Crawford 
county in the early 70s, settling on land in Martin township, where he followed 
farming until his death in 1920. He voted with the democratic party, stanch ly 
advocated its principles and served for many years as township supervisor. 
The cause of education also found in him a warm friend and for several years 
he served on the school board. His wife, who was born in Indiana, came to 
Illinois at the same time as her husband. 

William P. Carlton, who was the seventh in order of birth in a family of 
eight children, attended the rural schools and continued his studies in the high 
school of Oblong. He started out in the business world as a clerk in a local 
clothing store and after clerking for some time joined his brother in the estab- 
lishment and conduct of the Carlton Brothers clothing store, with which he 
was connected until 1924, when he sold out and established a real estate and 
loan business, which he conducted until his appointment to the position of 
postmaster on the 27th of September, 1933. This appointment naturally indi- 
cates his affiliation with the democratic parly, which he has supported since 
reaching adult age. He is much interested in its success and for four years 
has served as precinct committeeman. He attends all of the local meetings of 
the party and lias taken helpful interest in organization work. In 1918 lie 



118 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

was the unsuccessful candidate for circuit clerk. For two terms he served 
as alderman of Oblong and for four years was a member pf the county hoard 
of review, at all times discharging his duties with promptness and fidelity. 

On the 2nd of July, 1911, Mr. Carlton was married to Georgia Burroughs, 
a native of Crawford county and a daughter of Stull and Mary (Cunningham) 
Burroughs, who were of a pioneer democratic family of this section of the state. 
Her father was very active in the party and served as mayor of Oblong and as 
president of the village for several years before its incorporation as a city. He 
died in 1919 and is still survived by his widow. To Mr. and Mrs. Carlton have 
been born three children, Ruth, Rose Mary and Billie, aged respectively 
eighteen, fifteen and thirteen years. Like her husband, Mrs. Carlton is an 
interested supporter of democracy and belongs to the Crawford County 
Women's Democratic (Tub. Mr. Carlton belongs to the Jeft'ersonian Club and 
to the Chamber of Commerce, of which he was secretary for five years. Fra- 
ternally he is a Mason and a Woodman, and his religious faith is that of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 



FRANK B. WILSON 



Frank B. Wilson, a member of the fifty-eighth general assembly, repre- 
senting the tenth district, was born March 22, 1879, on the farm where be now 
lives in Woosung township, Ogle county, on Highway 26, between Dixon and 
Polo. His father, James P. Wilson, was a native of Blair county, Pennsylvania, 
born June 7, 1854. He was brought to Illinois in 1856, when but two years of 
age, the family settling in Lee county. He attended the public schools of Dixon 
and afterward became a pupil in Knox College at Galesburg, which he attended 
from 1S72 to 1874 inclusive. Lie subsequently took up the profession of teach- 
ing, which he followed for a short time, and then began farming in partnership 
with his brother Theodore, a business relation that was maintained for one 
year. In 1876 James P. Wilson purchased the farm whereon his son Frank now 
lives, taking up his abode thereon the following spring. Here he remained until 
the fall of 1903, when he removed to Polo, where he continued for three years. 
He then purchased a tract of land adjoining the city limits on the south and 
there successfully carried on general agricultural pursuits. In 1881, when 
Woosung township was organized, he was elected its first supervisor and filled 
the position for four years, serving as chairman of the board during the last 
year. In 1886 he was elected to represent the tenth senatorial district, com- 
prising Ogle and Winnebago counties, in the state legislature and served for the 
two-year period, making so excellent a record that in 1890 he was again elected 
to the office and once more in 1892. He participated in the famous hundred 
and one battle between John M. Palmer and William R. Morrison. In 1891 
he served as chairman of the important committee on appropriations. After 
several years' retirement from the office he was again elected in 1900 and be- 
came minority leader of the house, which at that time was under republican 
rule. In 1902 he was elected for the fifth term to represent his district in the 
general assembly and his work in the house was of great importance, for he 
loyally stood for every measure which he believed would prove of benefit to 
the commonwealth. He studied carefully the questions which came up for 
consideration and his efforts were far-reaching and his influence a potent force 
in winning party successes. In 1913 he was appointed by Governor Dunne a 
member of the firs! state highway commission. In 1912 he was chosen a director 
of the Exchange National Bank of Polo and some years later was elected 
president by the board of directors and continued to fill the office until his 
death, which occurred May '!. 1923. His wife, whom he married February 8, 
1S77, bore the maiden name of Mary Rogers and was born in Lee county, Illi- 
nois. December 16, 185-1. and passed away March 9, 1920. In the death of James 
P. Wilson. Ogle county lost one of her most distinguished and honored citizens, 
one who in many ways had left his impress for good upon the history not only 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 119 

of his community but also of the commonwealth. To him and his wife were 
born two sons, the younger, Jay J'., being a farmer near Polo. 

The elder son, Frank B. Wilson, attended the public schools of Dixon and 
was graduated from high school with the class of 1897. He then pursued a 
course in the Dixon Business College, and as his father was very active in 
politics, he returned home to take charge of the farm. He is now the owner of 
three hundred and twenty acres of rich and arable land, has placed his fields 
under a high state of cultivation and gathers therefrom abundant crops. To 
the farm he has added various improvements and has a beautiful country home 
standing in the midst of a large and well kept lawn. At his father's death he 
was eleeted a director of the Exchange National Bank of Polo and later 1 be- 
came its president, serving as such until 1931. 

On the 12th of, February, 1903, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss 
Dora Miller, daughter of T. J. and Mary (Emmert) Miller, of Dixon. Mr. ami 
Mrs. Wilson are the parents of a daughter, Mary Frances, who is the wife of 
Claude Horton, of Dixon, and the mother of one child, Nancy Ann. 

Mr. Wilson has never wavered in Ins allegiance to the democratic party and 
in 1921 was elected supervisor of Woosung township, Ogle county. This was 
followed by election to the same office in 1923, 1925, 1927 and 1931, and in 
1927 the office was made a three years' term. He had been elected each time 
without opposition in a republican township, a fact indicative of the splendid 
record he made in the position. At length he resigned to become a member of 
the state legislature, for which he was first nominated in 1928. Though de- 
feated in that year, he received so much encouragement from his many friends 
in both parties that he decided to make the race again in 1932, at which time 
he was elected by the largest majority ever given a candidate for the office in 
the district, receiving fifty-four thousand votes, or fourteen thousand more 
than his closest opponent. In the legislature he is serving on the committees on 
banks and banking, agriculture, roads and bridges, education, farm drainage 
and industrial affairs. On the banks and banking committee he is working 
untiringly, trying to draft new bank laws. Like his father before him, he has 
to his credit a highly commendable record as a lawmaker, for he is loyal to 
the best interests of the state in every way and his support can be counted 
upon to further any measure that he deems vital to the welfare and upbuilding 
of Illinois. He has attended a number of the state conventions and his opinions 
carry weight in party councils. Fraternally he is a Mason, having attained the 
thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite, and he is also a past commander of 
Dixon Commandery, No. 21, K. T. His entire life has been passed in Ogle and 
Lee counties and the sterling worth of his character is attested by his friends, 
who are coextensive with the number of his acquaintances. As a business man, 
as a citizen and as a political leader he ranks very high and he is now taking 
an active part in shaping the history of the state through legislative procedure. 



JOHN A. SHORT 



One of the democrats of Menard, Randolph county, Illinois, who is con 
sidered a credit to the party and one whose prestige and reputation lend aid to 
the party, is John A. Short, who is president of the First State Bank, of Chester 
and chief clerk of the Illinois state penitentiary al Menard, to which position he 
was appointed March 1, 1933. 

Mr. Short was born in Percy, Illinois, February 5, 1890, and is a son of 
Allen A. and Ella (Montieth) Short. The father was also born in Percy in the 
year 1857. He was a strong democrat, was county treasurer in 1890 and was a 
candidate for sheriff. Beginning in the farming industry, he later entered the 
grocery business with Jesse I. Meredith. Subsequently he joined Bernard Cohen 
in forming the Chester Supply Company, which was sold out in 1917, after which 
he retired to private life. His wife, the mother of John A., was born on a farm in 
Perry county and passed away in 1918. 



120 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

John A. Short was educated in the tirade and high schools of Chester, and 
later supplemented Ins studies with a business course in Quincy. From 1913 until 
11*17. lie was associated with his father in the Chester Supply Company, but in 
the hitter year Ids business activities were interrupted by his enlistment in the 
United States Navy, in which he served with merit until 1919. He was stationed 
in Cambridge and Boston, .Massachusetts. hi September, 1923, he started in 
the First State Bank of Chester and in his work he made wonderful progress, 
lie was appointed chief clerk of the Illinois State penitentiary at Menard, Illinois. 
on .March 1, 19:5:5, and still retains this position. 

Mr. Short was married in May, 1922, to Miss Lillian Etherton, who was born 
in Jackson county. Illinois, and to them has been born one son, John A., Jr., who 
is ten years old ( 19:54). 

Mi-. Short is a thirty-second degree .Mason and also belongs to the Mystic 
Shrine. Likewise, he is a member of the Eastern Star, the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, and the American Legion. 



CAPTAIN KENNETH A. ELMORE 

Captain Kenneth A. Elmore, managing officer of the Illinois Soldiers and 
Sailors Home at Quincy, has to his credit a splendid record of public service. 
He was born in Gibbs, Adair county, Missouri, April 2, 1895, a son of Emry 
and Mamie (Grubb) Elmore. George Elmore, great-great-great-grandfather of 
our subject, served as a sergeant in the Revolutionary war, fought at Guilford 
Courthouse and was present at the surrender of General Cornwallis at York- 
town, Virginia. His name appears in the census of 1790 as a resident of Wilkes 
county, North Carolina, where his son, Elijah Elmore, was born. Thomas Elmore, 
great-grandfather of Captain Elmore, was also a native of Wilkes county. North 
Carolina, born in 1801, and married Annie Saylers. His son, John S. Elmore, 
paternal grandfather of Captain Elmore, was born on a farm four miles east 
of Rushville, Illinois, in 1831. About the year 1851 he married Nancy Tweedell, 
who was born near Rushville, Illinois, in 1833, and departed this life in 1911. 
John S. Elmore removed with his bride to Adair county, Missouri, took up 
about one thousand acres of land south of Gibbs and there made his home until 
his death, which occurred in 1879. His remains were interred in the Elmore 
cemetery on his farm. 

Emry Elmore, son of John S. and Nancy (Tweedell) Elmore, was born 
on a farm about three miles south of Gibbs, [Missouri, August 4, 1871, and fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits in Adair county, that state, until about 1900. At 
that time he took up his abode in Gibbs, where he turned his attention to the 
carpenter trade. While a resident of Adair county, Missouri, he figured actively 
in local politics as a supporter of the democratic party and served as deputy 
sheriff and as justice of the peace. In 1907 he came to Illinois, locating in 
Quincy, where he resided until his removal to Los Angeles, California, in 1919. 
His religious faith is manifest in his affiliation with the Disciples of Christ. 
He was one of the organizers of the Christian Church of Gibbs, Missouri, and 
served as its Sunday school superintendent. Following his arrival in Quincy, 
Illinois, lie taught the men's Bible class of the Christian Church. Fraternally 
he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, while his wife was 
a member of the Rebekahs. In early manhood he had married Miss Mamie 
Grubb, who was born in Novelty, Missouri, July 17, 1S75, and who passed away 
December 26, 1919. She was a granddaughter of David and Harriett (McKellop) 
Grubb, who came to Illinois from the vicinity of Pottstown, Pennsylvania. Perry 
D. Grubb, father of Mrs. Mamie Elmore, was born at Liberty, Illinois, in 1840, 
and served in the Civil war as a member of Company E, Seventy-eighth Illinois 
Infantry, for four years. Following the cessation of hostilities he returned to 
Liberty but soon afterward went to Knox county, Missouri, where he taught 




CAPT. KENNETH A. ELMORE 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 123 

school. There he formed the acquaintance of Nancy McClintick, who was 
born in Novelty, Missouri, in 1852, and whose hand he won in marriage. There- 
after he devoted his attention to farming pursuits in Knox county, Missouri, 
until his removal to Adair county, that state. In the latter county he was 
twice elected to the Missouri legislature on the republican ticket, serving in the 
general assembly from 1892 until 1896. His death occurred October 15, 1918, 
when he was seventy-eight years of age. As above stated, his daughter Mamie 
became the wife of Emry Elmore and by this union there were born ten chil- 
dren, as follows : Lola Florence, who married Burton Jones and passed away 
March 8, 1920; Kenneth A., of this review; Fern Anna, who is the wife of John 
Barbera, of Los Angeles, California; Leland Bland, of Los Angeles, California: 
Marjorie, who is the wife of Roy Price, of Los Angeles, California; Virginia, tin 
wife of Robert Schenck, also of Los Angeles; Robert E., who is a sergeant in the 
Medical Corps of the United States Army and is now stationed at Fort Mc- 
Arthur; Joan, the wife of William Roberts, of Los Angeles, California; and two 
who died in infancy. 

In the acquirement of an education Kenneth A. Elmore attended the public 
schools of Gibbs, Missouri, and Quincy, Illinois. He enlisted in Company F, 
Fifth Illinois Infantry, in 1912 and was commissioned second lieutenant on 
the 5th of April, 1915. His company was called into service March 26, 1917, 
and two days later he was promoted to the rank of first lieutenant. After train- 
ing at Camp Logan, Houston, Texas, Lieutenant Elmore sailed for France with 
Company B, One Hundred and Twenty-third Machine Gun Battalion, Thirty- 
third Division, arriving in Brest, France, May 24, 1918. He served with his 
company in the British lines at Albert, France, for a short time and went to 
the Verdun sector on the 23rd of August. Thereafter he participated in the 
Meuse-Argonne offensive from September 26th to October 15th, was then as- 
signed to the St. Mihiel sector and went into the line at Fresnes-en-Woevre and 
Saulx-en-Woevre, being at Saulx when the armistice was signed. He had been 
promoted to the rank of captain on the 22nd of August, 1918, and he was back 
in the United States on the 20th of May, 1919. Returning to Quincy, Illinois, 
Captain Elmore became superintendent of the warehouse of the Irwin Wholesale 
Paper Company. In May, 1923, he was appointed chief of police of Quincy, 
thus serving until 1925. The following year he was elected sheriff of Adams 
county, which office he filled most acceptably from December, 1926, until Decem- 
ber, 1930, while subsequently he conducted a private detective agency in Quincy 
until the fall of 1933. It was on the 24th of November, 1933, that he was 
appointed managing officer of the Illinois Soldiers and Sailors Home at Quincy, 
the duties of which position he is now discharging in a most satisfactory and 
highly efficient manner. 

On the 10th of April, 1918, Captain Elmore was united in marriage to Helen 
Riley, daughter of Robert and Esther (Delaporte) Riley. Captain and Mrs 
Elmore are the parents of four children, as follows: Ruth Ann, born August 2 
1920; Richard Kenneth, born March 31, 1922; James Emry, born December 5, 
1927; and Joseph Arthur, born April 29, 1929. 

Captain Elmore has membership in the Rotary Club and fraternally is 
affiliated with the following Masonic bodies : Herman Lodge, No. 39, A,. F. & 
A. M. ; Quincy Chapter, No. 5, R. A. M. ; and Quincy Commandery, No. 77, 
K. T. His religious faith is that of the Christian Church. He is a member of 
the National Research Forum of Quincy and also belongs to a number of patriotic 
societies, including the American Legion, Forty and Eight, the Reserve Officers 
Association of the United States, Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War and 
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. He retains his connection as a 
member of the United States Army Reserve Corps with the rank of captain. 
He is national defense officer of the Third Division of the American Legion, 
Department of Illinois, and formerly he was defense officer of the Fifteenth 
District. 



124 [LLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

GEORGE 15. WALKEK 

George B. Walker, who luis the notable record of serving for eighteen 
terms as secretary of the democratic central committee of Alexander county, 
now fills the office of investigator for the state occupational tax in the southern 
division of Illinois and makes his home in Cairo. He was born in Fostoria, 
Illinois, in 1869. His father, William Walker, was born in Pennsylvania and 
died during the childhood of his son George. He was a sawmill operator and he 
always voted with the democratic party. He married Sarah Klingsmith, like- 
wise a native of the Keystone state, her father having been a Pittsburgh tailor. 

During the early youth of George B. Walker his parents removed with their 
family to Portland, Michigan, where he attended the public schools, taking 
the high school work as well as the course in the grades. He was also for a 
brief period a student in the University of Michigan. In early life he learned 
the printer's trade and became a member of the printers' union. In 1897 he 
returned to Illinois and for a time was advertising man on the Cairo Morning 
Bulletin. Later he assumed control of this paper and continued its publication 
until 1912, when he sold out and since then has conducted a commercial printing 
shop. He then again purchased the Bulletin with the backing of George 
Brennan, who died, however, before the project was well under way. Mr. Walker 
continues the commercial printing business but gives much of his time to 
political activity. He served for eight years under the administration of Presi- 
dent Wilson as internal revenue collector in charge of the Cairo office, and he 
is now investigator for the state occupational tax in the southern division of 
Illinois. His record of eighteen terms' service as secretary of the county central 
committee of the democratic party indicates his devotion to the cause and his 
unflagging efforts to promote party successes. He is also secretary of the 
congressional committee from the twenty-fifth district and he has been a 
delegate to several democratic national conventions, including those held at 
Houston, Texas, and Baltimore, Maryland. 

In 1894 Mr. Walker was married to Miss Julia T. Kemper, of St. Charles, 
Missouri, and they are now parents of a family of four children: Mrs. Beatrice 
O'Kane, a widow, who was appointed field agent for the Illinois School for 
the Blind and is very active politically ; Gale, the wife of H. G. Milligan, a 
resident of Birmingham, Alabama; Henry, who is a student in the Illinois 
College at Jacksonville; and Alyce, at home. 



FRANCIS MICHAEL MURPHY 

Francis Michael Murphy, deputy county treasurer of Sangamon county 
and a resident of Illiopolis, in which town he was born November 14, 1901, is 
a son of M. I. and Margaret (Galligan) Murphy, who were natives of Illinois. 
The father, who reached the age of seventy-two years, was actively engaged 
in farming. He had always been an ardent democrat and had held local offices 
in Illiopolis and had also been precinct committeeman. The mother has passed 
away and the father died July 11, 1934. 

Francis M. Murphy passed through consecutive grades in the public schools 
of Illiopolis until graduated from the high school in 1920. He afterward studied 
for two and one-half years at the Southeast Missouri State Teachers College 
in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, anil then taught school for one year in Sangamon 
county. He next became principal of the Hough school at North Dupo, some- 
times known as East Carondelet, Illinois. Subsequently he worked with his 
father on the farm and while thus engaged became active in politics, carefully 
considering the vital political questions and giving stanch allegiance to the 
democratic party. He is serving his fourth term as precinct committeeman 
from the Illiopolis Precinct No. 2 and on the 1st of December, 1933, he was 
appointed deputy county treasurer of Sangamon county under H. H. Mason, 
with whom he is still serving. He is closely allied with the organized efforts 
to promote the interests of democracy, being a member of the Jeferson Society 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 125 

of Sangamon county, in which he previously served on the executive committee, 
the Illinois Young People's Democratic League and the Roosevelt-Horner Demo- 
cratic Organization. Fraternally he is associated with the Knights of Columbus 
and tlie Modern Woodmen of America. Several times he has served as a delegate 
to the state conventions and in large measure his activities have centered upon 
political interests, with unfailing support of the principles in which he 
believes. 



CHARLES A. STRAKA 

Charles A. Straka, a resident of Milledgeville, well known by reason of In- 
activities as a bank receiver, comes to Illinois from Iowa. He was born in \e\\ 
Albin, in the Hawkeye state. August 16. 1875, a son of Frank and Anna 
(Shimerigal) Straka, the former a native of Germany. 

The public school system of his native town afforded Charles A. Straka his 
early educational privileges and following his graduation from the high school 
at Xew Albin he entered the Northern Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso. 
When his course there was "completed he turned his attention to railroad work, in 
which he engaged for about twenty-seven years. He was with the Milwaukee and 
Northwestern roads for about two years and later spent a quarter of a century 
in the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. In the fall of 1895 
he removed to Ogle county, Illinois, and was agent at Hazelhurst for seven years. 
He afterward spent a year at Dubuque, Iowa, as ticket agent and then came to 
Milledgeville. Carroll county, Illinois, as agent, so serving until 1922. when he 
became vice president of the Shumway State Bank. He served in that capacity 
until 1932 and on the 12th of January, 1934, he was appointed receiver for the 
First National Bank at Savanna. On the 5th of March, 1934, he was appointed 
receiver for the First National Bank of Chadwiek. 

On the 30th of September, 1896, Mi'. Straka was united in marriage to 
Hannah B. McPherson. a native of Ogle county. In his fraternal relations he 
is a Mason and an Odd Fellow Politically he has always been a democrat and 
has been quite active in party work since coming to Carroll county. In 1914 he 
was elected precinct committeeman and has served continuously since, covering 
a period of twenty years, being reelected at each biennial period. He does all in 
his power to further the interests and promote the successes of the party organi- 
zation. His wife was appointed committeewoman for Carroll county in 1932, 
is at present county parole officer for this county and is recognized as an out- 
standing political leader among the democratic women of this part of the state. 
She is on the speakers' list and during the campaign of 1932 made speeches in 
Carroll and adjoining counties, being a tireless worker in behalf of the principles 
in which she so firmlv believes. 



MARVIN T. WHITE 

Marvin T. White, machinist at the Southern Illinois Penetentiary of 
Chester, is a resident of Carbondale who has served as precinct committeeman 
for some time. He was born in Carbondale, Jackson county, Illinois, September 
9. 1899. his parents being John and Mary (Isman) White, the latter a native 
of South Bend. Indiana. The maternal grandparents of our subject lost their 
lives in the great Chicago fire of 1871. John White, father of Marvin T. 
White, was born in Salem, Illinois, in 1862 and became a resident of Carbon- 
dale while still a child. He was one of three brothers, all of whom became 
blacksmiths and metal workers. His brother. C. E. (Kid) White, figured very 
prominently in political circles, holding numerous offices in Carbondale. John 
White was also an active worker in the local ranks of the democratic party. 

Marvin T. White acquired his early education as a public school pupil of 
his native city and subsequently completed two years' high school work at 
the Southern Illinois State Normal University of Carbondale. Appointed a 
machinist in the shops of the Illinois Central, he was thus connected with 
the railroad from 1916 until 1920 and was thereafter retained in its employ 



126 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

until 1932. The following year he was appointed to liis presenl position as 
machinist at the Southern Illinois Penintentiary of Chester. A very aggressive 
democrat. Mr. White has served for some time as precinct committeeman and 
has been an effective worker in the local ranks of the party. lie belongs to 
the International Association of Machinists, while fraternally he is affiliated 
with the Masons and the Modern Woodmen of America. lie resides at 405 
North Washington avenue in Carbondale and is widely known as one of the 
representative and popular young native sons of the city. 



FLOYD J. TILTON 



Federal service in Ogle county finds a representative in Floyd J. Tilton, 
who is now postmaster of Rochelle and who is one of the well known residents 
of the county, where he has spent almost his entire life. He was born at Chana, 
in Pine Hock township, May 24, 1875, his parents being William W. and Alice 
(Canavan) Tilton. The father was born in Knox county, Ohio, November 2:5, 
L842, and his life record covered the intervening years to April 14. 1913, when 
he passed away. He had become a resident of Ogle county, Illinois, in 1S50, at 
which time he took up his abode on a tract of land in Pine Rock township, 
where he long followed the occupation of farming. In 1892 he was appointed 
postmaster of Chana and rilled the position for four years. In 1896 he re- 
moved to Rochelle, where he spent his remaining days. He believed firmly in 
democratic principles, always voted the party ticket and served in the county 
democratic organization. He attended several of the state conventions as a 
delegate, including the one in which John P. Altgeld was nominated for gover- 
nor. His life was actuated by strong religious faith and he was a helpful and 
loyal member of the Church of God. His widow, who was born in Ireland in 
August, 1845, survived him for a number of years, her death occurring in 1921. 

Floyd J. Tilton mastered the elementary branches of learning in the rural 
schools of Pine Rock township and afterward entered the Rochelle high school, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1895. He then took a teachers' 
training course and taught school for two years but in 1S97 entered the North- 
western University Law School, in which he completed a course in 1900, being 
admitted to the bar the same year. In 1901 he located for practice in Kewanee, 
Illinois, where he remained until 1907 and then came to Rochelle, where he has 
practiced since. However, he left Northwestern University to enter the army 
April 26, 1898, for service in the Spanish-American war, becoming a member 
of Company M, Third Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He served in the campaign 
in Porto Rico under General Miles and received his honorable discharge Jan- 
uary 16, 1899. Following his admission to the bar he entered upon active law 
practice and throughout the intervening years he has been closely associated 
with public interests in Ogle county, always giving his aid and cooperation to 
movements for the general good. He has been an active worker in the demo- 
cratic party since attaining his majority and he cast his first presidential vote 
for William Jennings Bryan. He served as precinct committeeman and was a 
member of the executive committee of the democratic party of Henry county 
while living at Kewanee. In 1904 he was a delegate to the convention in Peoria. 
Since his removal to Rochelle he has continuously been a member of the Ogle 
county democratic organization. He served for two terms, or four years, as 
chairman of the county central committee and did important work in guiding 
the interests of the party during that period. In 1912 he was the democratic 
nominee for the position of state senator and in 1914 was nominated for the 
office of representative to the state legislature. He has frequently been a dele- 
gate to the state conventions and in 1916 he attended the democratic national 
convention which met in St. Louis and again was a visitor at the national con- 
vention held in Chicago in 1932. On the 31st of May, 1934, he was commissioned 
postmaster of Rochelle and is now filling the office. During the World war 




FLOYD J. TILTOX 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 129 

period lie served as The democratic member of the local draft board. 

On the 11th of June, 1908, Mr. Tilton was united in marriage to Meilha C. 
Bailey and they are the parents of five children, as follows: Mary N., John W., 
Norval B., Catherine L. and Charles P. Mr. Tilton belongs to the Masonic 
fraternity and to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. In the former 
he has taken the degrees of the lodge, the chapter and eommandery, and he 
faithfully follows the teachings of the craft, for he is a firm believer in the 
principle of the brotherhood of man. Practically a lifelong resident of Ogle 
county, he has a very wide acquaintance within its borders and his life story, 
which is an open book to his fellow townsmen, has gained him the regard of 
all with whom he has come in contact. 

THOMAS DESPER 

Thomas Desper, a bridge tender living near La Salle, was born in La Salle 
township, La Salle county, Illinois, March 17, 1880. His parents, James and 
Kate Desper, both of whom have now passed away, were active adherents of 
the democratic party and the mother frequently made speeches at the picnics 
which were held in support of the Bryan campaign. They always resided in 
La Salle and were widely and favorably known in this locality. Their son, 
Ralph Desper, is now the democratic nominee for county sheriff and previously 
made the race for the office on two other occasions, once being declared elected 
but being counted out on the recount. 

Thomas Desper obtained his education in the public schools of his native 
tow r nship and became a farmer, having early been trained to the work of the 
fields. He continued to follow agricultural pursuits until February, 1933, 
when he became bridge tender at the La Salle bridge and is now acting in this 
capacity. He has been precinct committeeman for twenty-two years, dating 
back to the time when there were only three democratic votes in his precinct — 
those cast by himself, his wife and one other. Either Thomas Desper or his 
brother Ralph has continuously served as precinct committeeman in this pre- 
cinct since its organization, but Thomas Desper has never been an office 
seeker, working always for the party because of his belief in its principles and 
not with any desire for nor hope of political gain. 

In January, 1923, Mr. Desper was united in marriage to Mrs. Anna Allen, 
who has always been an active supporter of the democratic party. By a lor .ier 
marriage Mrs. Desper is the mother of one son, John, and by her second 
husband has three children, Thomas Joseph, James Alexander and Catherine 
Julian Desper. The family is well known in La Salle county, where Mr. Desper 
has spent his entire life and where his many friends esteem him highly by 
reason of his personal worth. 

MILTON M. DEAN 

Milton M. Dean, head farmer at the Illinois Soldiers and Sailors Home at 
Quincy, was born July 21, 1892, on a farm in Gilmer township, Adams county, 
his parents being 1). J. and Susan (Year-gain) Dean. The father was born in 
Burton township, Adams county, and followed farming there throughout 
practically his entire life. He always voted the democratic ticket and was a 
stanch advocate of party principles. He died in 1927 and is still survived by 
his widow, who was born in Gilmer township, Adams county. The family was 
founded in Illinois by George W. Dean, grandfather of Milton M. Dean. lie 
was born in Ohio and wedded Mary Hughes. Tn young manhood he came to 
Adams county, settling on a farm. He studied law and was admitted to the 
bar, but farming always remained his principle activity. In polities he, too, was 
a democrat, giving loyal support to the party, and he served for one term as 
a member of the house of representatives in the state legislature and for two 
or three terms as a member of the state senate. He attended practically all 
of the county and many of the state conventions of his party and he was a 



130 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

forceful, entertaining and convincing speaker who was ever ready to support 
his position by intelligent argument. 

Milton M. Dean pursued his education in the public schools of Adams 
county and when his school days were over secured employment with the 
Illinois I it'll Telephone Company, with which he remained for four or five years 
before entering the army. In April, 1918, he joined the American troops and 
was assigned to the Third Trench Mortar Battalion, lie went to Prance in 
-July, 1918, and returned to his native country in January, 1919, receiving his 
discharge on the 4th of February following. Since leaving the army he has 
carried on farming in Burton township, Adams county, and on the 15th of 
May. 1!t:!.'>, was appointed head farmer of the Illinois Soldiers and Sailors 
Home at Quincy. His previous agricultural experience well qualified him for 
the position and he is doing excellent work in this connection. 

On the 25th of November, 1919, Mr. Dean was united in marriage to Miss 
Mabel Spangler. He is a Mason of high rank, having attained the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite in the Quincy Consistory. He also has 
membership with the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Loyal Order of Moose, 
and he belo"hgs to the American Legion and to the Veterans of Foreign Wars. 
He has never failed to vote the democratic ticket since age conferred upon 
him th right of franchise and is recognized as one of the active party workers 
in Adams county. He served for three years on the board of supervisors 
from Burton township but resigned when he received his present appointment. 
He attends all local conventions of the democratic party and he has given 
many tangible proofs of his loyalty in all matters of progressive citizenship. 



CHARLES M. KLT1TI 



Among the progressive and enterprising business men of Clay City is 
numbered Charles M. Keith, a well known dealer in hardware and lumber. 
He is entitled to mention in this work as an active democrat who is now serving 
as precinct committeeman of Clay City and who has otherwise been closely 
connected with democratic politics in the state. He was born in Wayne county, 
Illinois. November 28, 1903, a son of Earl A. and May (Harrington) Keith, 
who are also natives of Wayne county, where their respective people settled 
in 1876, removing westward from Ohio. The grandfather in the paternal line 
was Charles II. Keith, who became a recognized leader of the democratic party 
in Wayne county and who served for several years as committeeman. He 
was also chairman of the Wayne county democratic central committee and 
was frequently a delegate to the judicial, congressional and state conventions 
of his party. During the Bryan campaign of 1896 he was particularly active, 
being a stalwart admirer of "the great commoner." In a word he was one 
of the recognized leaders of his party ami was a very prominent resident of his 
section of the state. His son, Earl A. Keith, a live stock dealer, is also a stanch 
supporter of the democratic party. 

Charles M. Keith was educated in the public schools of Rinard, Illinois. 
the high school at Flora and in the James Millikin University at Decatur, from 
which he was graduated in 1926 with the Bachelor of Science degree. Making 
his initial step in the business world, he secured a position as manager of the 
order and billing department of the Sexton Manufacturing Company at Fair- 
field. Illinois, where he remained for a year. In 1927 he removed to Flora, 
where he was employed until 1929. He then entered the hardware and lumber 
business at Clay City and here he has since operated, gaining a good trade 
and maintaining one of the foremost commercial enterprises of the community. 
He has always, like his father, been a supporter of the democratic party and 
became an active factor in its ranks on attaining his majority. He was elected 
precinct committeeman of Clay City in 1934 and was a delegate to the demo- 
cratic state convention held the same year in Springfield. He likewise belongs 
to the Jeffersonian Club and any movement instituted for the legitimate up- 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 131 

building of the party receives his endorsement and support. 

In 1928 Mr. Keith was married to Miss Margaret Durland, a representa- 
tive of a prominent family of Fayette county, and they now have one child, 
Audrey Kay. The parents are members of the Christian Church and loyally 
follow its teachings, while in his fraternal relations Mr. Keith is a Mason. 
He is likewise a member of the Business Men's Club of Clay City and he sup- 
ports every project that tends to advance the civic welfare and municipal up- 
building of the community. 



BERT A. MOLOHON 



Bert A. Molohon, who is the local director at Peoria of the state police, 
was appointed to this position in 1933 thru Max Lieberman and is fearlessly and 
faithfully discharging the duties that devolve upon him. A native son of Illi- 
nois, he was born at Pawnee, Sangamon county, November 9, 1897, his parents 
being James A. and Frances (Pollard) Molohon. The father's birth occurred 
in Sangamon county, Illinois, his father being James Molohon, Sr., who was 
a well known pioneer of that section of the state. Dennis Pollard, the grand- 
father of Bert A. Molohon in the maternal line, was born in County Cork, Ire- 
land, as was his daughter Frances, who became the wife of James A. Molohon. 
By this marriage there were born five children : Bert A. ; Vernon, who is engaged 
in the cigar business in Springfield, Illinois; Geneva, the wife of Charles 
Wenner, in the electrical business in Cleveland, Ohio ; Carletta, and Cleone. Of 
this family, Geneva became a teacher and was connected with the schools of 
Taylorville and of Kincaid, Illinois. 

Bert A. Molohon completed his education in the Pawnee high school and, 
starting out in the business world, became a salesman for the wholesale grocery 
house of the Jageman-Bode Company of Springfield, Illinois. Subsequently 
he acted as salesman with the California Packing Corporation. In the meantime 
he had established his home in Peoria and here enjoyed a wide acquaintance, 
especially among merchants. His interest in politics became well known and 
the democratic [tarty recognized his efficiency as a worker in its ranks. He 
was chosen to manage the campaign when Mayor O'Brien was candidate for 
the office of Peoria's chief executive and following the election was appointed 
by Mr. O'Brien to the office of collector of special assessments. Later he ac- 
cepted his present position as local director at Peoria of the state police and 
has under his control twenty-seven members of the state police force. He will 
be in charge of the headquarters of the party for the fall campaign. 

Mr. Molohon married Miss Margaret Wolfe, who was born in Springfield 
and is a daughter of Edward J. and Mary Wolfe. The children of this marriage 
are Shirley Jean and James Patrick. Mr. Molohon is the grand knight of 
Spalding Council, No. 427, of the Knights of Columbus and he also has member- 
ship with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 158, at Springfield, 
Illinois. He is widely and favorably known in Peoria, where his circle of friends 
is almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintances. 



WILLIAM E. DARRELL 

William E. Darrell, of Wauconda, who is a member of the highway patrol, 
was born in Lake county, Illinois, northwest of Wauconda, in 1902. His parents, 
Willard and Edith Darrell, make their home on a farm near Wauconda, the 
father having devoted Ins life to agricultural pursuits. He has always been a 
democrat, voting for the men and measures of the party, and he was made a 
precinct committeeman when the democrats came into power at the recent election. 

In the acquirement of an education William E. barrel! attended the Slocum 
Lake tirade school and afterward spent three years as a high school pupil in 
Wauconda. He was an active assistant of his father on the farm until he 
reached the age of eighteen years and subsequently followed construction work- 
in various places, doing much labor of that character on the lake homes of this 



132 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

pari of the county. When the recent democratic administration came into power 
he was made a highway maintenance helper and was later promoted to the position 
of highway maintenance patrolman, in which capacity he is now .serving. He does 
not lightly regard the duties of his position hut works faithfully and earnestly to 
give a service In the state that will be of real benefit, lie has been an active 
democrat since reaching liis majority and he is a member of the Waucouda 
Democratic Club. 

In .July, 1930, Mr. DarreU was united in marriage to Miss Evelyn Roether 
and they are the parents of two children, George and Marilyn. The family is 
well known in Wauconda and throughout this section of Lake county, where 
Mr. Darrell has always lived and where he has a large circle of warm friends — 
,-i Eac1 that is indicative of a well spent life. 



EDWARD G. Z1LM 



Edward (J. /dm, a resident of Streator and chairman of the democratic 
county central committee of La Salle county, is a well known party repre- 
sentative and has tilled various offices. Born in Marshall county, Illinois, 
.March 22, 1875, he is a son of William and Minnie (Rinkenberger) Zilm, both 
of whom came to the United Stales from Germany and have now passed away. 
They spent their lives in Marshall county, having located there in the early .ids. 
They lived upon a farm, Mr. Zilm devoting his entire time and attention to 
the work of the fields. In politics he was a democrat and for many years 
rilled the office of township supervisor. He also served as assessor and collector 
and was very active and influential in local affairs. He was also an earnest 
supporter of the church and equally loyal to the cause of education, doing 
everything in his power to advance the intellectual and moral progress of the 
community. He and his wife w T ere members of the German Lutheran Church, 
but as there was no congregation of that denomination in the community, 
they became active members and workers in the Presbyterian Church until 
such time that they were able to organize a Lutheran congregation in the late 
'70s after which they became active members of it. All who knew them enter- 
tained for them the highest respect, to which they were well entitled by reason 
of their upright lives. 

Edward G. Zilm, while spending his youthful days under the parental 
roof, attended the local grade and high schools at Streator and then started 
out to provide for his own support by obtaining employment in the office of a 
coal mining concern. lie came to Streator to enter the employ of Daniel Heenan 
& Company and was afterward with the Riverbank Coal Company. Subse- 
quently he obtained a position with the Howe Coal Company, with which he 
remained for seventeen years as head of the office, his long connection therewith 
indicating unmistakably his fidelity to duty and his capable service. In 1016 
he turned his attention to the insurance business and he has for a number of 
years been secretary of the Peoples Building & Loan Association, which is 
the largest in Streator. 

At various periods Mr. Zilm, like his father, has been called to public 
office. For four years he filled the position of city clerk and for an equal 
period was county treasurer and for four years was probate clerk. Beginning 
in 1918, he entered upon a six years' service as commissioner of streets and 
alleys of Streator and on the 26th of April, 1933, he became a member of the 
pardon and parole board of Illinois by appointment of Governor Horner. In 
1932 he was elected chairman of the democratic central committee of La Salle 
county and is still rilling that position, having been re-elected in 1934. Previously 
he had served as secretary of the county organization from 1!)14 until 1!)16, 
and he was a delegate from La Salle county to the convention which nominated 
Woodrow Wilson in Baltimore in 1912. He has also been a delegate to prac- 
tically all state conventions for the last twenty years and an alternate to 
several national conventions and was a visitor to the Chicago convention in 




EDWARD G. ZILM 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 135 

1932. In 1932 he organized the first women's democratic organization in La Salle 
county and his labors have been a far-reaching force in advancing democratic 
successes in this part of the state. 

In 1894 Mr. Zilm was united in marriage to Miss Sadie Parrett, of Ottawa, 
Illinois, and they became the parents of a daughter, Pauline, who passed away 
in 1928. following her twenty-first birthday. Mrs. Zilm is very active in church 
and social affairs. Mr. Zilm is a member of the Kiwanis Club and the Streator 
Club. Both Mr. and Mrs. Zilm belong to the Park Presbyterian Church and 
fraternally he is a Mason, having attained the thirty-second degree in the 
Scottish Rite and to the Commandery in the York Rite. He is also an Elk. He 
takes an active interest in everything that pertains to the progress of city ami 
state and his support is given to any measure that he deems of worth to the 
individual and to the community at large. 



FRAXK STORCKMAN 



Frank Storckman, who in 1931 was appointed overseer of the poor at 
Mount Carmel and who also directs important business interests, was born in 
Lawrence county, Illinois, October 11, 1869, a son of August and Eliza (Boden) 
Storckman. His parents, who were natives of Germany, came to the United 
States prior to the Civil war and established their home in Lawrence county. 
where the father was active in business as a cooper and as a farmer. In 
polities he was a stanch democrat, voting with the party from the time thai 
American citizenship was conferred upon him. 

Frank Storckman acquired a country school education but put aside his 
textbooks when comparatively young to devote his entire time and attention 
to farming, which he followed in his native county for six years. He then 
established his home in Lancaster, Wabash county, where he conducted a 
general store for five years. In the meantime he had become well known and 
in 1902 received appointment to the position of deputy sheriff of Wabash 
county, in which capacity he served until 1905. He then entered the grist and 
grain business at Mount Carmel, continuing active therein for seven years or 
until 1912, when he established an automobile business which he carried on 
until 1915. In that year he was appointed postmaster by President Woodrow 
Wilson and occupied the position until 1921, when he again entered the auto- 
mobile business, in which he remained active until 1926. Since the latter 
date he has had charge of the farms of the Midwest Bank of Edwardsville, 
Illinois, and displays marked business ability in the management of these 
interests. He further broadened the scope of his activities when in 1931 he 
accepted appointment to the position of overseer of the poor of Mount Carmel. 

In politics Mr. Storckman has always been an active democrat since 
attaining bis majority. When twenty-one years of age he was elected tax 
collector of Lukin township, Lawrence county, and served in that position for 
four years. He was also precinct committeeman of Lancaster during his stay 
there and after his removal to Mount Carmel was made precinct committee- 
man of the third precinct, in which position he continued until 1928. in 1896 
he was chosen chairman of the Bryan committee of his county and for 
twenty years he has been chairman of the Wabash county democratic central 
committee, most wisely directing the affairs of the party organization during 
this extended period. He marshals the party forces with the precision of a 
military commander and has been very successful in getting out the full 
strength of the party. In 1909 his fellow townsmen elected him to the office 
of mayor of Mount Carmel and for two years he remained the executive head 
of the municipality, during which time he introduced various needed reforms 
and improvements. The cause of education has also found in him a stalwart 
champion and for several years he served on the school board. He has taken 
active part in campaign work by addressing public gatherings in support of 
(he entile tiekel through a period of forty years and he has been a delegate to 



136 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

many congressional, judicial and state conventions, having ;i wide acquaintance 
among the leaders of democracy throughout Illinois. 

On tlic 14th of February, 1892, Mr. Storckman was united in marriage to 
M iss Sallie Schwartz, a daughter oi William and Carolina I Grisener I Schwartz, 
of Lawrence county, who were representatives of < of the pioneer demo- 
cratic families there. Mr. and Mrs. Storckman have had a family of six 
children: Fivd II., living in Carlisle, Indiana; Evelyn, who is the widow of 
Eugene Larner, of St. Louis; Mabel, the wife of Charles E. Fischer, of 
Wabash county, Illinois; Clem F., a practicing attorney of St. Louis; Eugene, 
deceased; and Mary E., at home. The family is widely and favorably known 
in Mount Carmel and throughout Wabash county, occupying an enviable 
social position. Fraternally Mr. Storckman is connected with the Elks and 
with the Woodmen and enjoys the warm friendship of his brethren of those 
organiza! ions. 



PAUL B. LAUGEL 



Paul B. Laugel, postmaster at Newton, where for a number of years he 
has been well known as a dealer in automotive equipment and farm implements, 
was born in .Jasper county, Illinois, December 11, 1890, a son of Severine F. 
and Minnie (Schackmann) Laugel, who were also natives of Jasper county. 
The grandfather in the paternal line was born in Alsace-Lorraine and came 
to the United States in the late '50s, settling in Sainte Marie, Jasper county, 
Illinois, where he engaged in merchandising. His son, Severine F. Laugel, be- 
came a school teacher and was also one of Jasper county's largest landowners, 
having at the time of his death in 1928 about three thousand acres of rich and 
valuable land. In 1910 he organized the Sainte Marie State Bank and was its 
president until his demise. He was always a stanch democrat and a liberal 
contributor toward party expenses. For over thirty years he served on the 
city council and took a keen and helpful interest in advancing municipal wel- 
fare. His widow survives and yet makes her home in Newton. 

After attending the public schools of his native county Paul B. Laugel 
entered Brown's Business College at Terre Haute, Indiana, and thus qualified 
for life's practical and responsible duties. Returning home, he has throughout 
most of the intervening period been closely associated with political and busi- 
ness activities in Newton. He was deputy circuit clerk from 1908 until 1912 
and in the latter year became identified with the Wells Fargo Express Company 
in Chicago, where he remained until 1915. He then returned to Jasper county 
and established bis present business at Newton, handling an extensive line 
of automotive equipment and farm implements, in which connection he has won 
a substantial trade. He is also vice president of the Sainte Marie State Bank. 

In 1921 Mr. Laugel was married to Miss Edna Leffler, a native of Jasper 
county, Illinois, and a daughter of Douglas Leffler, one of the prominent sup- 
porters of democracy in Jasper county who served at one time as its sheriff. 
Mrs. Laugel is a member of the Jasper County Women's Democratic Club. 

In May, 1918, Mr. Laugel enlisted for service as a member of Company K, 
Tenth Illinois Infantry, and received his discharge in January, 1919. He be- 
longs to Jasper County Post, No. 20, of the American Legion and has served 
as its treasurer and adjutant. His interest in community welfare is shown in 
his connection with the Civic Club and with the Rotary Club, while his religious 
faith is indicated in the fact that he is a member of the Knights of Columbus. 
His political endorsement has been unfalteringly given to the democratic party 
since he reached his majority and he has attended all of the state, congressional 
and judicial conventions since 1920. He was present at the national convention 
in St. Louis in 1916 and the Chicago convention of 19:52. He became one of the 
organizers of the Jeffersonian Club in Jasper county and always works for the 
support of the entire ticket. Since 19:51 he has been alderman of Newton and 
in 1934 was appointed postmaster by President Roosevelt. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 137 



CHARLES MIDDLETON McCOY 



Charles Middleton McCoy, a well known agriculturist of Crawford county 
who is serving as postmaster in Hutsonville, was born on the tartn which he 
now operates in Hutsonville township. His parents were Albert Clayborn and 
Elizabeth (Hardway) McCoy, natives of Ohio, who came to Crawford county, 
Illinois, with their respective pa rents, thus casting in their lot with the eany 
settlers of this region. The paternal grandfather, William McCoy, attracted 
by the discovery of gold in California, was one of those who joined in the gold 
rush, crossing the plains to the Pacific coast in 1<S49. Albert C. McCoy re- 
sponded to the country's call for aid at the time of the Civil war and joined 
the Union Army as a member of Company C, One Hundred and Fifty-fifth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Following the close of his military experience he 
took up farming on the old family homestead and devoted his remaining days 
to the work of tilling the soil. He was a stanch democrat, always voting tor 
the men and measures of the party. He died in 1879 and was long survived by 
his wife, who passed away in 1926. 

Charles M. McCoy attended the country schools and the public schools of 
Hutsonville and early became familiar with the work of tilling the soil and 
caring for the crops as he assisted his father on the old home place. Later he 
was employed on different farms in the neighborhood until he had carefully 
saved his earnings to a sufficient extent to enable him to purchase the old home- 
stead, which has been in possession of the family since 1849. Here he was born 
and reared, and the further cultivation of the fields now claims much of his time 
and attention. He has added modern improvements to the property and is 
energetic and enterprising in all of his work. 

In 1900 Mr. McCoy was married to Miss Rose May Wilson, a daughter of 
William and Sarah (Reigel) Wilson, representatives of one of the pioneer fami- 
lies of Robinson township, Crawford county. The children of this marriage are : 
Alva C, living in Hutsonville; George Mervyn, Orris Milbert and Earl Barton, 
all at home. 

Mr. McCoy has been a member of the business committee of the organiza- 
tion oi iarmers of his township since 1907. He has served for twenty-one years 
on the school board and the cause of education finds in him a stalwart champion. 
For five years, from 1928 until 1933, he was town clerk. He has voted with the 
democratic party since casting his first ballot and has been an active worker 
in its ranks, always supporting the entire ticket. He attends all of the local 
political meetings and has been precinct committeeman since 1930. In June, 
1934, he received appointment to the position of postmaster at Hutsonville. 
His record both as a man and citizen is unassailable and he has many warm 
friends throughout Crawford county, where his family has been represented 
for eighty-five years. 

GEORGE H. WALES 

George H. Wales, the well known postmaster of Lanark, is also recognized 
as an active worker in democratic circles and is now serving as secretary of the 
county committee. He was born October 5, 1873, in the city where he yet re- 
sides, his parents being Charles and Marion (Emery) Wales, the former a 
native of Massachusetts, while the latter was born in Hull, England. 

George H. Wales was reared in Carroll county, attending the public schools, 
and afterward continuing his education in the Illinois Wesleyan University at 
Bloomington. In young manhood he entered the amusement business, in which 
he engaged until appointed postmaster of Lanark on the 6th of June. 1934, 
so that he is the present incumbent in the position. He has given a robust sup- 
port to democracy since attaining his majority and is now secretary of the 
Carroll county democratic central committee, taking up the work of the office 
in 19.30. He is doing an excellent service in this connection and is gratified 
at the steady growth of the party. 



138 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

In 1892 Mr. Wales was united in marriage to Miss Martha Snow and they 
are the parents of a son, Emery Charles. Mr. Wales is widely known as a repre- 
sentative of Masonry and has taken the degrees of the lodge, chapter and con- 
sistory, in which he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. 
He also belongs to the Mystic Shrine and is one of the prominent members of 
the fraternity in Carroll county. 

Mr. Wales is an accomplished musician and as a young man traveled ex- 
tensively in vaudeville. After returning to Lanark he entered the moving 
picture business and as a pioneer in this industry established three circuits, 
moving his entire picture plant each day for the evening show in the local opera 
house. These circuits were well established and remained in operation for 
over twenty years. For many years Mr. Wales played in the military band at 
Bloomington, Illinois. As a member of this band he accompanied Adlai Steven- 
son to Washington when he was elected vice president. 



CHARLES C. DICKMAN 

A foremost representative of the democratic party in Illinois is Charles 
C. Oickinan, well-known attorney of Peoria, who is now serving as a member 
of the State Board of Pardons and Paroles. He has always lived in Illinois, 
his birth having occurred in Staunton, Macoupin county, April 13, 1883, his 
parents being Mathias and Mary (Courtlever) Dickman, both of whom were of 
German birth. On leaving Europe, the mother having been born in Perth, 
Holland, and the father in Duesseldorf, Germany, they came to the new world 
and settled in Illinois about 1881. Their family numbered seven children, 
namely: Matthew, now a resident of Jacksonville, Illinois; Frederick, who 
was a veterinary surgeon of Galena, Illinois, now deceased; Mary, now the wife 
of Harvey J. Morris of Pontiac, Illinois ; Mrs. Minnie Fitzsimmons, widow of 
Matthew Fitzsimmons, and a resident of Pontiac ; Mrs. Hulda Duffey, a resident 
of Pontiac ; Mrs. Helena Schwerdt, of Glen Ellyn, Illinois, who is the wife of 
Frank Schwerdt ; and Charles C, of this review. 

Charles C. Dickman pursued his education in the city schools, and in high 
school in Pontiac, Livingston county, Illinois, and continued his studies in the 
State Normal School at Normal, Illinois, after which he took up the profession 
of teaching, which he followed in Clinton. Illinois, in Pontiac, in Chillicothe, 
ami finally in Peoria. Desirous of broadening his own information, he pursued 
a course in engineering at the University of Illinois and then took a course in 
the University of Chicago Law School. The degree of Bachelor of Philosophy 
was also conferred upon him. He began the practice of law in Peoria in 1919 
and has remained a close student of the profession, always thorough and pains- 
taking in the preparation of his cases. He served as United States commissioner 
from 1922 until 1926, and in 1931 he became corporation counsel of Peoria. In 
1933, he was appointed by Governor Horner as a member of the State Board of 
Pardons and Paroles and is now most acceptably serving in this office, which 
is one of large responsibility and importance. 

Mr. Dickman was united in marriage to Miss Grace Marie Raymond, a 
daughter of Frank and Emily (Stevens) Raymond. Her father was a veteran 
railroad man who served for an extended period as general superintendent of 
the Santa Fe Railroad, also as assistant general manager in Topeka, Kansas, 
and had just been given an appointment as general manager in Amarillo, Texas, 
when he died in 1921. Mrs. Dickman was a teacher in the schools of Chillicothe, 
Illinois, prior to her marriage. She has become the mother of one son, Charles 
V., now ten years of age. 

Mr. Dickman has membership with the Modern Woodmen of America 
and with the University Club of Peoria. He has served as county chairman of 
the democratic party in Peoria county for six years and through his powers of 
organization contributed to its development and success, never failing to exer- 
cise his right of franchise in support of democratic candidates because of his 




CHARLES C. DICKMAN 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 141 

firm belief in the principles of the party. He recognizes fully the duties and 

responsibilities as well as the opportunities of citizenship. The practice of 
law, however, remains his real life work and in this field he has gained a position 
of much more than local eminence. 



GLEXX JOSEPH KUSZMAUL 

Among those who arc rendering valuable public service in office in Henry 
county is numbered Glenn Joseph Kuszmaul, who is a highway maintenance 
patrolman and who makes his home near Prophetstown. He was born in Delavan, 
Tazewell county, Illinois, February 17, 1909, and is a son of John J. and Flora L. 
(Summers) Kuszmaul, who have long resided at Delavan, where they still make 
their home. The father has followed farming as a life work and has been suc- 
cessful in the cultivation of his fields and the care of his crops. In polities he has 
ever been an earnest democrat. 

Glenn J. Kuszmaul attended the Delavan public schools, hi which he com- 
pleted the work of the eighth grade. He next entered the Peoria Central high 
school, from which he was graduated with the class of 1926. He had been reared 
to the occupation of farming and after his school days were over he took up 
farming on his own account in Henry county and continued to engage in the 
development of his fields until February 8, 1933, when he was appointed highway 
maintenance patrolman and is still acting in that capacity. From the time when 
he cast his first vote he has been an active worker in democratic circles and he 
has served on the election board and in other local positions. He belongs to St. 
Mary's Catholic Church at Hooppole, Illinois, and his loyalty to any cause which 
lie espouses lias always been one of his pronounced characteristics. 

WILLIAM H. MALEY, M. D. 

Dr. William H. Maley. a physician and surgeon who has proven his ability 
to successfully cope with intricate and involved professional problems, main- 
tains an office in Galesburg and is accorded a gratifying patronage. His birth 
occurred March 27, 1867, on a farm south of the city, his parents being Michael 
and Ann (Ryan) Maley. The father, who was born in County Limerick, Ireland. 
in 1828, came to the United States in 1858, settling in Knox county, Illinois, 
where he devoted his remaining days to farming. He was always a stanch 
democrat and kept well informed on the questions and issues of the day. He 
passed away in 1901 and for a quarter of a century was survived by his wife. 
who was born in Peoria county, Illinois, in 1839 and departed this life in 1926. 

Their son. William II. Maley, was a pupil in the rural schools of Knox 
county and later in St. Joseph's Academy of Galesburg. In 1888 he was grad- 
uated from Brown's Business College of this city and in 1894 completed a 
course in Knox College which won him the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and 
Master of Science. He determined to make the practice of medicine his life 
work and with that end in view entered Rush Medical College of Chicago, in 
which he was graduated in 1897. He has constantly broadened his knowledge 
and promoted his efficiency by further study and investigation. In 1900 he 
did post-graduate work in New York, in 1902 in Germany and in 1922 in 
Chicago, and throughout all the intervening years he read broadly and thought 
deeply and made his work of the greatest possible benefit to his patients. It 
was in 1897 that he opened an office and began practice in Galesburg, where 
as a physician and surgeon he has won a notable and enviable place. He has 
remained continuously in this city save for the periods of his post-graduate 
study elsewhere and the period of his military service. For fifteen years he 
was a member of the Illinois National Guard, serving with Battery B of the 
One Hundred and Twenty-third Field Artillery. On the 7th of April, PUT. 
he took the oath accepting his fourth commission as a first lieutenant. The 
commission had been lying on his desk for several weeks, but on the day war 
was declared against Germany he took the oath and wired his acceptance of 
the commission. In July, 1!»17. he was called into active service at Des Moines. 



L42 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

[owa, tn help muster in the Rainbow Division and three weeks later he was 
sent to Topeka, Kansas, ami thence to Kansas City, Kansas, to assist in muster- 
ing in Other units of that division. He was next assigned to Fort Benjamin 
Harrison at Indianapolis, Indiana, to serve with Company !) and was there 
promoted to the rank of captain. In the following' October he was transferred 
to Philadelphia and three weeks later was sent from there to Camp McClelland 
at Anniston. Alabama, lie was on duty in surgical service with the Eighty- 
ninth Division and alter spending the winter at Anniston he was transferred 
in the spring to New York City tor surgical work in the Roekfeller Institute 
and the Bellevue Hospital. His next assignment took him to Jefferson Barracks, 
St. Louis, where he prepared for overseas, sailing in August, 1918, with Base 
Hospital No. 131. He landed at Mar-sur-Alliers near Nevers, France, and 
before sailing lor Europe he had been promoted to the rank of major. He 
served as chief of the surgical service at Base Hospital No. 131, being the 
only physician Iroin Knox county, Illinois, in active overseas duty. At the 
dose of hostilities he was sent to St. Xazaire and was placed in command of 
camp infirmary, Bare Hospital No. 1, where he remained until June 30, 1919, 
when he started for home, landing in New York on the 5th of July and receiv- 
ing his discharge on the 31st of the same month. He now holds a major's 
commission in the Medical Reserve. 

Dr. Maley was married June 30, 11)02, to Miss Clara A. Forrester, of Tay- 
lorville, Illinois, a sister of the late Senator James A. Forrester, and they went 
to Europe mi tin ir wedding trip, the Doctor doing post-graduate work in 
Berlin and Vienna through a period of three months. Mrs. Maley is a graduate 
of the Knox College Conservatory of Music and has been prominent in women's 
political and club activities. To Dr. and Mrs. Maley have been born two 
sons. William Forrester was graduated from the University of Illinois in 1930 
and from the College of Medicine of the University of Illinois at Chicago with 
the cdass of 1934 and is now an interne in St. Anne's Hospital of that city. His 
medical fraternity is the Nu Sigma Nu; Robert Frederick, who was graduated 
from the University of Illinois in 1933, is now on the steamship President Van 
Buren of the Dollar Line as assistant to the purser and is also superintendent 
of entertainment and sports on the vessel. On the 21st of June, 1934, he started 
upon his third trip around the world. Both sons are members of the Phi Kappa 
Tan. 

Dr. Maley belongs to the American Legion, the Forty and Eight, the 
Veterans of Foreign Wars and is a past grand knight of Galesburg Council 
Xo. 556 of the Knights of Columbus. He also belongs to the Galesburg Club 
and to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Along strictly professional 
lines he has membership in the Galesburg, Knox county, Illinois State, and 
American Medical Societies, and the Tri State Medical Association. In politics 
a stalwart democrat, he attends the state conventions of the party and also 
attended the national convention held in Chicago in 1932. For twenty-five years 
he served as a member of the city council of Galesburg and rendered efficient 
aid in promoting municipal projects and in advancing those interests which 
are a matter of civic virtue and of civic pride. His professional rating is that 
of one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Galesburg and he possesses 
a rare personal charm which makes for warm friendships and kindly regard. 



WILLrAM II. JEREMIAH 

William II. Jeremiah, county inspector of mines in Randolph county, has 

1 n continuously identified with mining interests in southwestern Illinois 

during the past third of a century and is also a member of the Randolph county 
democratic central committee. He was born in Duquoin, Perry county, Illinois, 
October 2s, 1886, his parents being Edmund and Katherine (Stanhouse) Jere- 
miah, who were natives of Wales and Scotland, respectively, the former born 
July 20. 1858, and the latter April 20. 1S64. The mother of our subject crossed 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 143 

the Atlantic to the United States about 1M80 in company with her father, an 
accountant, who settled in Duqnoin, Illinois, and there spent the remainder 
of his life. Edmund Jeremiah, the father of William II. Jeremiah, was brought 
to America as an infant by his father, who served with the Union forces in 
the Civil war. Edmund Jeremiah became a coal miner and farmer of southern 
Illinois, while politically he was a loyal supporter of the democratic party. 

William II. Jeremiah attended public school in his native city until fourteen 
years of age, when in 1900 he began working in the coal mines. Mining 
interests have claimed his attention throughout the intervening years to the 
present time, and he has served as county inspector of mines in Randolph 
county since appointed to the position in 1929, proving a most capable incum- 
bent therein. Long an active worker in the local ranks of the democratic 
party, he has been a member of the Randolph county democratic central com- 
mittee for fourteen years. He has been nominated for sheriff of his county. 
He has fraternal affiliations with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
is known among his many friends as an enthusiastic baseball fan. 

On the 27th of July, 1909, Mr. Jeremiah was united in marriage to Miss 
Rosa Hagon, who was born in Tennessee, of Pennsylvania Dutch stock, and 
whose father is a stonecutter by trade. Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah are the parents 
of eight children, as follows: Edgar, a resident of Sparta, Illinois; Clifford, a 
basketball enthusiast, who is a graduate of the Southern Illinois State Normal 
University of Carbondale and lives in Sparta : Wanda, the wife of Howard 
Hughes, of Sparta; and Lucille, Evelyn, William, Margaret and Minnie, who 
reside with their parents at 416 East Church street in Sparta. Mrs. Jeremiah 
attends the services of the Baptist Church and, like her husband, enjoys an 
extensive and favorable acquaintance throughout her home community. 



FRANK R. MORGAN 



Among those men who have executive control of municipal affairs in Peoria 
is numbered Frank R. Morgan, now serving as a member of the city council. 
He was born at Grafton, Jersey county, Illinois, February 1."), 1902, being a son 
of Anderson and Emma (Adkins) Morgan. The father's birth occurred near 
Louisville. Kentucky, and the mother was born in Jersey county, Illinois. She 
was a daughter of Amos Adkins, a Civil war veteran who served with the Union 
Army during the period of hostilities between the north and the south. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Anderson Morgan there were born eight children, one of whom 
has passed away, while those still living are: Frank R., of this review; Dorothy, 
who is a teacher in the Longfellow school of Peoria ; James, a resident of Rome, 
Illinois; William, of Peoria; Minnie, wife of Fred Prim, also living in Peoria; 
Nona, wife of Ueorge Brainard, a farmer of Grafton, Illinois; and Ray. who is 
likewise a resident of Grafton, this state. James and William both served with 
the Thirty-third Division in the World war and Ray was a lieutenant in the Fifth 
Division while America was participating in the hostilities between the German 
forces and the allied troops. 

Prank R. Morgan pursued his education in the rural schools of Jersey 
county and the Peoria high school and started out to provide for his own sup- 
port by learning and following the barber's trade. He soon gave that up, 
however, to join the Caterpillar Tractor Company of Peoria and became an 
expert in relation to the mechanics of this machine, so that he was sent by the 
company to Columbia, South America, and afterward to Russia as an expert 
service man to assure the mechanical satisfaction of the machines sold in those 
countries. On his return to the United States he also assisted in the compilation 
of books of instruction on the proper use of the tractors and thus occupied 
responsible positions in connection with tractor manufacturing and sale. In 
1932 he was selected as superintendent of the state service garage at Peoria. 
serving District No. 4 of the highway department, having the care and main- 
tenance of Heets of trucks and road building devices as well as other motor 



1 II ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

ears. In industrial circles lie occupies an eminenl position because his ability 
lias been developed to a superior point. 

On the LOth of February, 1932, Mr. Morgan was united in marriage to 
.Miss Beatrice Vaughn, a native of Rock Island. Illinois, and a daughter of 
Roberl and Ollie (Kent) Vaughn, now living in Peoria. Mr. Morgan belongs 
to the L niversalist Church and to Temple Lodge. A. F. & A. M. In politics he 
lias always been a demoeral and was one of the organizers of democratic forces 
in the first ward and has been a committee captain there since 1931. In 1932 
he was elected alderman of the first ward, so thai as a member of the city council 
he is now aiding in the onerous task of directing municipal affairs. He brings 
to his official duties the same conscientious purpose which he has shown in busi- 
ness life and the record which he is making is a commendable one. 

WARD P. HOLT 

Ward P. Holt, serving for the second term as state's attorney in Salem, 
was born October 4, 1899, in the city in which he still makes his home, and is a 
representative of one of the oldest of the pioneer families of Marion county, 
where his great-grandfather, Henry Holt, settled on removing from Tennessee. 
His grandfather, William H. Holt, who was also born in Tennessee and afterward 
became a resident of Ohio, was living in Illinois at the time of the Civil war 
and responded to the country's call for aid by enlisting as a member of the 
One Hundred and Eleventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry under Colonel James 
S. Martin, who afterward became a general. William II. Holt served for three 
years and was with Sherman on the celebrated march to the sea and in all of the 
activities of the Atlanta campaign. He married Sarah Parsons and their son, 
Charles H. Holt, was born near Vernon, Marion county, October 1, 1868. 

Charles H. Holt, father of Ward P. Holt, became one of the county's 
ablest and most distinguished lawyers — in fact was recognized as one of the 
foremost members of the bar in southern Illinois. A public-spirited citizen, 
he was faithful to every trust reposed in him and his influence was ever on the 
side of right and progress. He acquired his early education in the country 
schools, which he attended in the winter months, and in the high school of Salem, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1889. He prepared for the bar 
as a student in Northwestern University of Chicago, winning his LL. B. degree, 
after which he located for practice at Kinmundy, Marion county. Notwith- 
standing the fact that advancement at the bar is proverbially slow, he forged 
steadily forward and recognition of his ability came to him in 1898, when he 
was elected county judge, occupying the bench for two terms, the fairness and 
impartiality of his decisions winning for him high commendation among his 
fellow townsmen. In 1904 he located in Salem, county seat of Marion county, 
where he engaged in the active practice throughout the remainder of his life. 
He served as state's attorney for one term and he prepared his cases with great 
thoroughness, leaving no point undeveloped that would win for him the verdict 
desired. Interwoven with his professional activity was his earnest support of 
the democratic party, based upon a firm and unfaltering belief in its principles. 
He served as chairman of the Marion county democratic central committee and 
was a delegate to many judicial, congressional and state conventions, while in 
1916 he attended the national convention in St. Louis as an alternate and again 
in the same capacity went to Chicago in 1932, when the democratic convention 
named Franklin D. Roosevelt, for the presidency. 

In 1897 Charles II. Holt was married to Miss Frances M. Fox, daughter of 
Dr. and Mrs. Jesse D. Fox, who formerly lived in Kinmundy, Illinois. They 
Long occupied a prominent position in the social circles of the community, and 
Mr. Holt, aside from his profession, was connected with the business interests 
of Salem as a director of several banks. The practice of law, however, was the 
outstanding factor in his life and he possessed one of the finest law libraries of 
southern Illinois, with the contents of which he was extremely familiar. His 
death occurred May 16. 1933. 




WARD P. HOLT 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 147 

Ward P. Holt, after attending- the grammar and high schools of Salem, 
matriculated in the University of Detroit and on the completion of the regular 
law course received his LL. B. degree as a member of the class of 1925. For a 
short time he practiced in Michigan and then returned to Salem, Illinois, where 
he became associated with his father. In 1928 he was elected state's attorney 
and endorsement of his first term came in a reelection in 1932 for a further 
term of four years. Like his father before him, lie holds to high professional 
ideals and his close study of legal problems, combined with his thorough under- 
standing of principle and precedent, has made for a gratifying success at the bar. 

In 1928 Mr. Holt was married to Miss Margaret Helen Lassline, a daughter 
of Albert M. Lassline, a hotel man of Detroit, Michigan, and they have one child, 
Joanne, three years of age. Mr. Holt is a member of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective order of Elks and the Loyal Order of Moose. He also belongs to the 
Rotary Club and the Chamber of Commerce, while along strictly professional 
lines his connection is with the Marion County, Illinois State and American Bar 
Associations. Prom his youthful days he has been keenly interested in politics 
and since attaining his majority an active worker in the ranks of his party. In 
In association with Guy McGaughey of Lawrence county he organized the South- 
ern Illinois Federation of Democratic Clubs, of which he is the secretary. Since 
1928 he has been a delegate to all congressional, judicial and state conventions 
and since that year he has also been an active campaign worker, addressing- 
many public gatherings on the issues of the day, in 1932 taking the stump for 
Governor Horner. He recognizes fully the value of organization and of business- 
like direction in all political affairs and his labors have been far-reaching and 
resultant. 



JOSEPH PANIER 



Joseph Panier, a resident of Mark, Putnam comity, is a highway patrolman, 
having filled this position since November 14, 1933. He has always lived in 
Illinois, his birth having occurred in Gardner, Grundy county, this state, Feb- 
ruary 6, 1891. His parents, Martin and Margaret Panier, have both passed away. 
The family resided at Mark for thirty years and the father gave stalwart 
allegiance to the democratic party. 

Joseph Panier was educated at Carbon Hill, Illinois, and after he had left 
school became a coal miner. He later worked in a grocery store and subsequently 
conducted a soft drink parlor, being thus engaged up to the time when he re- 
ceived state appointment to the position of highway maintenance patrolman, in 
which connection he has served for a year. 

On the 6th of January, 1915, Mr. Panier was united in marriage to Miss Hose 
Monier, her parents being Octave and Pauline Monier, the former now deceased. 
A brother of Mrs. Monier is a carpenter contractor of Springfield, Illinois. The 
Moniers have always been active supporters of the democratic party. Mr. and 
Mrs. Panier are the parents of four children : Margaret, Alfred, Joseph and 
Rosemarie. The family attends the Catholic Church and Mr. Panier has always 
been a democratic supporter. His brother, John Panier, is precinct committee- 
man in Ottawa and Joseph Panier is also a precinct committeeman of Mark. He 
was mayor of Mark for five years and policeman for one year, and lie resigned 
both positions to accept that in which he is now serving. He lias always been 
active and influential in town affairs and his aid and influence have ever been 
given on the side of upbuilding and improvement. 



J. W. HUTTON. M. I). 



Dr. J. W. llutton, actively engaged in the practice of medicine at Newton 
and also serving for the third term as county coroner of Jasper county, was 
born in Fleiningsburg, Kentucky, January 23, 1876, his parents being George W. 
and Lydia (Arnold) llutton. The father was a nieiclianl and trader and in 
politics was a stanch democrat, very active in party work. He attended many 



148 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

state, congressional and judicial conventions and lie did much to further the 
interests of democracy because of his firm belief in its principles as factors in 
good government. He departed this life in 1913, having for about nine years 
survived his wife, who passed away in 1904. 

.1. W. HuttOll attended the grade and high schools of Morehead, Kentucky, 
and when he had mastered the branches of learning taught in the high school 
he entered upon preparation for a professional career as a student in the College 
of Medicine of the University of Cincinnati, which he attended for two years, 
lie next matriculated in the Barnes Medical College of St. Louis, from which 
lie was graduated with the M. I), degree in 1899. The following year he took 
post-graduate work and then located for practice at Rose Hill, Jasper county. 
Illinois, where he remained until 1912, when he came to Newton. Here he has 
since maintained his office and has enjoyed a substantial practice that is con- 
tinually growing. He is a member of the Jasper County and Illinois State Medi- 
cal Societies and the American Medical Association, and through the proceed- 
ings of these organizations and their published reports he keeps in touch with 
the latest researches and discoveries of the profession. 

On June 12, 1918, Dr. Hutton was married to Miss May Simpson, of Jasper 
county, and they are widely and favorably known in southeastern Illinois. 
The doctor is a Mason, loyally following the teachings of the craft. He also 
belongs to the Independent Order of (h\i\ Fellows and the Rebekahs, the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America and the Royal Neighbors. Politically he is an active 
democrat, giving unfaltering allegiance to the entire ticket and working 
consistently for party interests since reaching adult years. He is now serving 
his third term as county coroner and otherwise gives his attention mainly to 
his professional duties. 

HORACE COWEN 

Horace Cowen, editor and owner of the Hume Record, a well known 
democratic paper of Edgar county, has utilized this organ to further the 
interests of the political party with which he has been allied since attaining his 
majority. Mr. Cowen is a native of Crescent City, Illinois, where he was born 
December 26, 1892, his parents being Charles and Frances (Frantz) Cowen. 
w r ho are likewise natives of this state, their people having settled in Illinois 
long prior to the Civil war. The mother was a daughter of Horace Frantz, who 
served with the Union Army in the period of hostilities between the north and 
the south and was wounded in battle. Both the Cowen and Frantz families 
were stanch democrats. Charles Cow 7 en followed the lumber business as his 
life work but is now living retired at Hume, enjoying a well earned rest. 

Horace CoAven acquired his education in the grammar and high schools of 
Havana, Illinois, up to the time when lie entered the University of Illinois. 
When his textbooks wvre put aside he became associated with the Armour 
Grain Company and continued in that field of business until 1927. when he 
purchased the Hume Record, which had been established in 1890 by David 
Bradley as a weekly paper. Mr. Bradley continued its publication until 1895, 
when he sold out to George Ballard, who edited and published the paper until 
1905. It was then owned by Allen Martin from 1905 until 1908 and by Otto 
Hippleheuser from 1908 until 1927, when it was purchased by Mr. Cowen. 
It has always been published as a democratic paper and now has a circulation 
of twenty-one hundred and forty. Its editorials carry weight in democratic 
circles and the paper has been an influential organ in shaping public thought 
and opinion. 

Mr. Cowen has been active in democratic politics since becoming of age 
and in 1934 was elected precinct committeeman of Young America township, 
Edgar county. He has attended several state, congressional and judicial con- 
ventions of his party and in 1932 he assisted in organizing the Jeffersonian 
Club in Young America township. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 149 

On the 7tli of June, 1920, Mr. Co wen was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
E. Shaw, a daughter of James and Martha (Baldwin) Shaw and a representa- 
tive of a pioneer family of Indiana. Mrs. Cowen is active in politics as a sup- 
porter of the democratic party and is a member of the Edgar County Women's 
Democratic Club. Mr. Cowen belongs to the Masonic fraternity and He is identi- 
fied with several societies along the line of his chosen life work, having member- 
ship in the Illinois Press Association, the Illinois Democratic Editors Associa- 
tion, of which he is vice president, and the Illinois Weekly Newspapers 
Association. 



J. WALTER LOWREY 



J. Walter Lowrey, who is engaged in the real estate and insurance business 
in Joliet, has been a lifelong democrat and for eight years has served as secretary 
of the Will County Democratic Organization. He was born in this city, September 
18, 1888, a son of William P. and Catherine W. (Clare) Lowrey, both of whom 
have now passed away. The father was a railroad man, devoting his entire 
life to that business. William II. Clare, an uncle of J. W. Lowrey, was a recog- 
nized leader of Will county democracy and his opinions were always followed 
as to party policy and activity. Although twelve years have passed since he 
was called to his final rest, he is still frequently mentioned in democratic circles. 
He was appointed internal revenue collector at Chicago, was a delegate to many 
of the conventions of the party and was very active in civic organizations. 

J. Walter Lowrey supplemented his grammar school studies by a course in 
the high school of Joliet and started out in the business world as cost accountant 
for the Illinois Steel Company, with which corporation he remained for eleven 
years. He became connected with the United States Army, having entered the 
Signal Corps, after which he was transferred to the Air Service, lie acted as 
personnel officer during the World war and he is now a member of the American 
Legion. He also belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights of Columbus, the last named asso- 
ciation indicating his connection with the Catholic Church. Politically he has 
always been a democrat, active in the party, and has served as a delegate to the 
national conventions. He has been both senatorial committeeman and precinct 
committeeman, and for eight years he has served as the secretary of the Will 
County Democratic Organization. He was also supervisor of census of the 
eleventh congressional district, having been appointed to the position by Presi- 
dent Woodrow Wilson. He always recognizes the duties and obligations as well 
as the privileges of citizenship and therefore works for the principles in which 
he believes. His business interests center in real estate and insurance with his 
brothers, William P. Lowrey, Sr., and George J. Lowrey, under the firm name 
of W. II. Clare & Company, and they have developed a strong agency, having 
many clients, so that the business is a growing and profitable one. Mr. Lowrey 
was appointed postmaster of Joliet in 1934 by endorsement of Senator Lewis 
and Senator Dieterich. 



ARTHUR L. BOLAND 



Arthur L. Boland, a member of the younger contingent of democratic 
workers in Peoria county, was born in the city of Peoria, October 11, 1905, his 
parents being John P. and Anna (Brown) Boland, both of whom were natives of 
Elmwood, Illinois, their respective parents having been pioneer residents of 
this section. Both the paternal grandfather, Michael Boland, and the maternal 
grandfather, Fred Brown, were soldiers of the Union Army in the Civil war 
enlisting from Illinois. Michael Boland was born in Tipperary, Ireland, and be- 
came the founder of the family in this state. John P. Boland, who has been 
active in democratic politics in Peoria for many years, served as superintendent 
of streets during the administration of Mayor Ahrends. 

Arthur L. Boland, who is one of a family of seven children, pursued his 



150 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

education in St. Johns school of Peoria and in the Spalding Institute. For a 

number of years after putting aside bis textbooks he was associated with his 

father in the contracting business and he is now identified with the Standard 
Plumbing Supply Company. This is a national organization and he occupies 
a responsible position in the Peoria branch. 

On October s, 1930, Mr. Boland was united in marriage to Miss Ruby M. 
Hammer, a native id' Peoria, Illinois, and a daughter of Joseph and Gertrude 
Hammer. Since reaching the voting age Mr. Boland has been an active demo- 
crat and was captain of the tenth ward in the election of 1932. lie works 
earnestly and effectively for the party and his Labors are Ear-reaching. 



HARRY E. SAATIIOFF 

Harry E. Saathoff, of Hillsboro, who is filling the office of sheriff of Mont- 
gomery county, was born in tins county on the 20th day of September, 1879. His 
father, Thomas \V. Saathoff, a native of Germany, came alone to the United 
States when a youth of sixteen years and settled at Mount Olive, Illinois, where 
lie took up the occupation id' farming, which he followed as a life work. lie 
died in 1901, and Ins wife, who bore the maiden name of Rachel Bolen and was 
a native id' Illinois, survived him until 1921. Their family numbered six son-. 
and two daughters, namely: Heie, of St. Louis. Missouri, who for a time was 
connected with a stamping company of that city and is now with the Simmons 
Hardware Company; Anna, who died in 1898; Lena, who died in 1926; Herbert, 
a business man of Litchfield; John and Henry, who have operated the Farmers' 
Elevator at Litchfield since 1910; George, who is connected with the Henry L. 
Doherty Investment Company of New York City as assistant manager of the 
engineering department; and Harry E., of this review. 

The last named attended the schools of his native place until eight years 
of age and then worked upon the home farm until he reached the age of twenty. 
He was afterward in the elevator of Knobbe Brothers in Litchfield for about a 
year and a half, after which he went to St. Louis, where he worked on the street- 
ear line for about three years. Following his return to Litchfield he was 
employed at odd jobs until 1907, when he became a member of the Litchfield 
police force, and for two years he served as chief of police. On the expiration 
of that period he became manager of the Farmers' Elevator and so continued 
for three and one half years, when he was appointed deputy sheriff in 1914. 
acting in thai capacity for nine years. In 1928 he became superintendent of 
the waterworks of Litchfield and after efficiently serving in that capacity for 
two years he took charge of the pumping' station. In 1930 he was elected sheriff 
and is now nearing the end of a four years' term, it being a law that the sheriff 
cannot hold the office for a longer period. He has been a faithful custodian of 
the public peace and is actuated by high ideals in all of his official service. In 
fact his record is most notable in his efforts to aid culprits and especially way- 
ward youths and restore them to their rightful position in society by instilling 
into their minds high ideals of citizenship. Since taking office it has been his 
aim to keep boys out of the reform school, and at one time he had over one 
hundred boys paroled to him, of which number only one ever went back a second 
time. At this writing he has fifty boys paroled to him, and the efforts of no 
citizen id' Hillsboro have been more directly beneficial in saving the youth of the 
county. He recognizes the boy nature and knows that the youthful tendency 
toward waywardness may be curbed and that the right influence and stimulus 
will turn the wayward boy into a straightforward and honorable man. His 
work in this connection alone entitles him to the highest endorsement of bis 
fellow townsmen and has commanded for him the warmest respect on the part 
of all. 

Mr. Saathoff was married in 1908, when Miss Lottie Loss, of St. Louis, 
became his wife. She passed away in 1926 and four years later, in 1930, be 
wedded Marv Lone, of Litchfield. Mr. Saathoff and his familv belong to the 




HARRY E. SAATIIOFF 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 153 

Lutheran Church. In politics Mr. Saathoff has always adhered to the demo- 
cratic party, as had his ancestors through several generations. Since 1903 he 
has been a member of the Litchfield volunteer fire department and lie belongs 
to Litchfild Lodge No. 389 of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
Throughout all the years he has made good use of his time and opportunities and 
his life has been well spent. 



RALPH B. JOHNSON 



Ralph B. Johnson, of Galesburg, who is inheritance tax investigator for 
Illinois, was appointed to his present position on the 1st of April, 1933. He is 
recognized as an untiring worker in democratic circles and since April, 1932, 
lias served as a precinct committeeman. His birth occurred in Galesburg, 
Illinois, May 6, 1904, his parents being Frank J. and Alma (Bruington) John- 
son. His grandfather in the paternal line was John Johnson, who was horn 
near Wheeling, West Virginia, in 1820 and who came to Illinois about 1836 
with his parents, the family home being established in Warren county. He 
was a stalwart supporter of the democratic party throughout his entire life. 
He married Amanda P. Whitman, who was born in Warren county, Illinois, in 
1831, and in this county occurred the birth of their son, Frank J. Johnson, on 
the 25th of April, 1875. Like his father, he has always been an active democrat, 
working for party interests since attaining his majority. He has also been on 
the election board since 1920 and he served on the school board of Sparta 
township. Knox county, while engaged in farming in that locality. He was 
also elected assessor of Coldbrook township, Warren county, while farming 
in that township. His entire life has been devoted to agricultural interests 
but he has also recognized and met the obligations and duties of citizenship 
and has labored effectively for the public welfare. He married Miss Alma 
Bruington, who was born in Warren county, Illinois, March 12, 1877. Their 
children were four in number: Mary, who became the wife of Max V. Arm- 
strong, of Abingdon, who is a democrat, now serving as a precinct committee- 
man ; Ralph B., of this review; Arnold J., who was killed in an automobile 
accident in 1931; and Elwin, who is living at home. 

After attending the country schools of Coldbrook township, Warren county. 
Ralph 15. Johnson mastered the branches of learning taught in the high school 
at Wataga, Knox county, and was graduated with the class of 1924. Previously 
he had attended Brown's Business College of Galesburg and later he spent 
one year as a student in the American Institute of Banking in Chicago. He 
likewise studied law in the University of Chicago for two years and thus he 
has been continuously broadening his knowledge and promoting his efficiency. 
In January. 1926, he became an employe in the Federal Reserve Bank of Chi- 
cago, where he continued until September, 1928. He afterward spent a short 
time in the National Bank of the Republic in that city, and it was while 
working in connection with the banking business there that he attended the 
American Institute of Banking and studied law in the University of Chicago. 
He is still pursuing his law studies under the LaSalle Extension University. 

Mr. Johnson has been active in democratic affairs since becoming a voter 
and during the campaign of 1928 he worked untiringly to support Al Smith, 
then a candidate for the presidency. In 1929 he returned to Galesburg. where 
he has since engaged in the insurance business, and on the 1st of April, 1933, 
he was appointed state inheritance tax investigator. In April, 1932. he was 
elected a precinct committeeman and was again chosen for the office in 1934. 
He was likewise a delegate to the democratic state conventions of both those 
years and he has always been an active party worker, bis labors being far- 
reaching and resultant because he is a man of broad vision and his efforts are 
most intelligently directed. In August, 1932, he was one of the organizers of 
the Junior Jefferson Club and was elected its president. When he received his 
state appointment he resigned this position. In 1934 he assisted in the organi- 
zation of the Knox County Young Democratic Club. 



154 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Johnson is a Mason and his religious faith 
is indicated in bis membership in the Christian Church. He is yet a young man 

and his has been an active and well spent life, gaining for him the warm regard 
and respect of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



ALBERT M. HERP.K; 



Albert M. Herbig, who has devoted many years to the garage business and 
who is now serving as a member of the highway maintenance police, with head- 
quarters in Sterling, makes his home in Savanna, Carroll county. He was horn 
in Freeport, Illinois, May 11, 1904, a son of Milton and Minnie (Herbig) Smith, 
the former now deceased. The boy was adopted by his maternal grandfather, 
Adolph Herbig, in 1908, when a little lad of but four years. He attended the 
public schools of Freeport, thus acquiring a fair English education to serve as 
a foundation upon which to rear the superstructure of success in later life. In 
young manhood he learned the machinist's trade, serving an apprenticeship with 
the Stovers Manufacturing Company of Freeport, with winch he remained for 
two years. He afterward worked as a mechanic in garages and subsequently 
established a garage business on his own account in Freeport. He has since been 
active as a garage man, either in Freeport or Savanna, having removed to the 
latter city about 1920. He thoroughly understands everything pertaining to 
the mechanism of the automobile and has been accorded a liberal patronage in 
that field of business. On the 25th of March, 1933, he was appointed highway 
maintenance police of District No. 1, with headquarters in Sterling, and has since 
served in that capacity. 

Mr. Herbig lives with his mother in Savanna and has been active in local 
democratic politics in Carroll county since old enough to vote. He belongs to the 
Carroll County Democratic Voters League and he gives hearty cooperation to 
all movements which arc intended to advance the interests of the party organi- 
zation. 



LEONARD C. TRAENKENSCIIUH 

Leonard C. Traenkenschuh, a lifelong worker in the democratic ranks and 
now serving as superintendent of streets in the present administration of Peoria, 
well deserves mention in the history of Illinois Democracy. He was born in 
Rock Island county, Illinois, September 18, 1890, a son of Kasper and Catherine 
(Heubeck) Traenkenschuh, both of whom were natives of Bavaria, Germany. 
They came to Illinois as pioneer settlers and established their home in Rock 
Island, remaining honored citizens of that community for many years. They 
were active in the Lutheran Church and lent their influence to all projects for 
the benefit and upbuilding of the community. In their family were five children, 
as follows: Charlotte, Kate, Rosetta, Carl and Leonard ('. 

The last named completed his education at River Forest, Illinois, and de- 
ciding to follow teaching as a vocation, removed to Peoria on securing a position 
in the parochial school of Christ Lutheran Church at Malone and Chandler 
streets. He did a splendid work in that connection, serving the mission faith- 
fully for sixteen years. Subsequently he entered the life insurance business, 
which he followed until 1930. 

Mr. Traenkenschuh had long been active in the councils of the democratic 
party and in 1930 he was one of the active workers in behalf of the candidacy 
of Mr. Ahrends, who had been nominated for mayor. After the election he was 
appointed to a position in the public works department, and following the, 
election of Mayor O'Brien he was made superintendent of streets and sewers. 
He is now serving in this capacity and his duties are discharged with promptness 
and fidelity, making him an efficient public officer. 

In 1912 Mr. Traenkenschuh was united in marriage to Miss Edith Zagel. 
of Van Wert. < >hio. a daughter of Rev. Frederick Zagel, a minister of the Luther- 
an denomination, who held a pastorate at Effingham, Illinois, for seventeen years 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 155 

and for twelve years was superintendent of the Children's Home in Peoria. His 
wife prior to her marriage was Anna Zwerner. .Mr. and Mrs. Traenkensehnh 
have become the parents of four children: George, Anna, Victor and Eugene. 
Mr. Traenkensehnh is a member of and organized the South Side Business 
Men's Club, and belongs to the Cosmopolitan Club, while his religious faith 
is indicated by his membership in the Lutheran Church, in the work of which 
his wife also takes a helpful part. He does everything in his power to promote 
the upbuilding of Peoria along intellectual, social, political and moral lines and 
his influence is far-reaching: and beneficial. 



ANTOINETTE ANNA (JAGODZINSKI) GAWARECK] 

Antoinette Anna (Jagodzinski) (Jawarecki was appointed to a position in 
the state department of rehabilitation in February. 1 !».'!:'>. She has long taken 
a very active and helpful interest in political affairs as a supporter of the demo- 
cratic party. A native of La Salle, Illinois, she is a daughter of Francis and 
Mary Ann (Waszkowiak) Jagodzinski. The family came to America in 1^70. 
settling in La Salle. Here the daughter Antoinette attended school, pursuing her 
studies in St. Hyacinth parochial school and also taking a business course under 
private instruction. Her life interests have been of a varied character. An 
intense lover of music, in which art she has been liberally educated, she helped 
organize the St. Cecilia Singing Society and she was also vice president of the 
Polish Singers of the State of Illinois. She has been a delegate to the National 
Singers Alliance of America and is widely and prominently known in musical 
circles. She organized the Polish Women's Choir of La Salle and she has managed 
many concerts and plays. She is also a director and was the organizer of the 
Polish Women's Alliance of America, of which she has been a?i active member 
for twenty years and a director for twelve years. She assisted in organizing 
the Juvenile Society of Polish Women and in 1921 was a delegate to the Polish 
National Relief Society of America at the convention held in Pittsburgh. In 
the fall of 192:! she was made a member of the reception committee to welcome 
General J. Haller in Chicago. In a word, Mrs. (Jawarecki has always been an 
organizer since she was a girl of fifteen or sixteen years and her labors have 
added much to the cultural development of the state. She organized the Women's 
Democratic Club of La Salle county and she lias been secretary of the Polish 
Political Club id' St. Hyacinth's Church. She is precinct committeewoman of 
one of the most populous precincts of La Salle county, and is chairman of the 
women's democratic organization of the county. She came of a family that 
always gave support to the democratic party, her father being one of its most 
active workers, although he never accepted office as a return for party fealty. 
Francis Jagodzinski recently passed away, but his wife is still living. 

It was on the 28th of September, 1!>04, that Antoinette Anna Jagodzinski be- 
came the wife of Joseph John (Jawarecki, who was born in Sroda, Poland, Feb- 
ruary 2, 187S, a son of John and Magdalina (Dropek) Gawarecki. He was 
brought to La Salle county during Ids infancy and was here reared and educated. 
Many years ago he began merchandising and still continues active in the business. 
lie has taken a very prominent part in church work and in fraternal societies 
and lias been a delegate to the conventions of the National Polish Alliance. In 
politics lie has always been a democrat, and during the World war both he and 
his wife took a very active part in relief work. Their family numbers three 
children: Mrs. [sabelle Bruder, of La Salle; Marion; and Mrs. Loretta Persett, 
of La Salle. Both the daughters and their husbands are active democrats, and 
the son is a prominent member and vice chairman of the Polish American Demo- 
cratic Association of La Salle. In a word, the family has been particularly 
prominent among the Polish people of this part of the state and .Mrs. (Jawarecki is 
a recognized leader among Polish women. Her labors have been far-reaching- ami 
beneficial and she has done much to add to the joy of life through her work in 
musical circles. 



156 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

ALBERT EDWARD LICE 

Albert Edward Lee, of De Kail), who is a state game warden, was horn ill 
State Center. Iowa. .March '_'. 1906, a son of Henry Lewis and Marie (Edler) 
Lee. The father removed from Ogle county, Illinois, to the city <>l De Kalb in 
1896. 

In the acquirement of his education Albert E. Lee attended the grade 
schools of his native town, and following the removal of the family from Iowa 
to |)e Kalh. Illinois, he here attended high school as a member of the class of 
1924. He next entered the Northern Illinois State Teachers College at De Kalb 
and completed his course in 1926. lie afterward engaged in the confectionery 
business in I )e Kalb, after which he was recreational manager for the Knights 
of Columbus, No. 553, at South Lend, Illinois. On the 16th of June, 19.3:5, he 
was made investigator of conservation for the state and is now occupying that 
position. He has been a lifelong democrat and is the presenl comity chairman 
of the Young Peoples Democratic League, a position which he has occupied 
since 1932. In the same year he was made vice chairman of the twelfth con- 
gressional district. He attended the state convention held in Springfield and 
also the national convention in Chicago. From 1928 until 1931 he was a member 
and active worker in the Democratic Club of St. Joseph county, Indiana. He 
belongs to the German Lutheran Church and is interested in all that pertains 
to the social, intellectual, political and moral progress of his community. 

RAYMOND B. SIEPKEE 

Raymond B. Siepker, an attorney practicing at Barry. Pike County, was 
born in Kansas City, Missouri, June 29, 1884. His father, Bernard H. Siepker, 
whose birth occurred in Quincy, Illinois, in 1861, became a carriage painter 
of that city and for many years filled the responsible position of foreman in the 
E. M. Miller carriage factory there. He always voted with the democratic party 
and he passed away in 1919. His wife, who bore the madien name of Nettie F. 
Weed, was born in Augusta, Illinois, in 1862. 

Raymond B. Siepker had the advantage of instruction received in the ex- 
cellent public schools of Quincy and when he had mastered the grades entered 
the high school, from which he was graduated in 1906. Attracted to a profes- 
sional career, he then began the study of law in the office and under the direction 
of J. 1. Foreman, of Quincy, and was admitted to the bar in February, 1910. 
In March of the following year he opened an office in Argenta, Arkansas, where 
he continued until Christmas of 1913, returning then to Quincy, Illinois, where 
he practiced until the fall of 1917. At that time he removed to Barry and in 
the intervening period of seventeen years has enjoyed a large and growing clien- 
tele and one of distinctively representative character, occupying an enviable 
position among the lawyers of western Illinois. 

On June 5, 1918, Mr. Siepker was married to Miss Ella .May Joor. They 
have a son and a daughter, Raymond B. (II) and Janice Mae. The family 
attends the Methodist Church, and in addition to his membership therein Mr. 
Siepker is a Mason, belonging to the blue lodge and chapter at Barry and to 
the commandery at Pittsfield. In these connections are indicated the rules that 
govern his conduct, making him a man among men, respected by all with whom 
he comes in contact. The democratic party has always counted upon his en- 
dorsement and support since the attainment of his majority brought to him the 
right of franchise. He has served several times on the Pike county democratic 
central committee and has attended the state conventions of the party as a 
delegate for the past eighteen years. 

JOHN FRANCIS MeCANN 

John F. MeCann, the postmaster at Oglesby by democratic appointment, 
had previously filled other offices and his record in each has won for him high 
commendation. Oglesby, the place of his residence, is also his native city. He 
was born December 27. 1904, a son of John and Jennie (Donnelly) MeCann. 




RAYMOND B. SIEPKER 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 159 

The lather has passed away, but the mother is still living in Oglesby. James 
McCann, the granuiatlnr ol our subject in' the paternal line, was an early 
settler of La Salle county and was a very earnest supporter of the democratic 
party. John P. Donnelly, the maternal grandfather ot John F. McCann, came 
to La Salle county in pioneer times and he. too, voted the democratic ticket 
and held a number of local offices. John McCann, the father oi J. F. McCann, 
served as chief of police of Oglesby for eighteen years, a record which indicates 
beyond question his fidelity to duty in that position. After his retirement from 
the office he was made justice ot the peace. His brother. Thomas McCann. 
served as postmaster of Oglesby under President Wilson and Hugh, another 
brother, served as mayor of the city, so that the family has been closely asso- 
ciated with public affairs and has always been recognized as a stalwart element 
in democracy here. 

John F. McCann is a machinist by trade ami followed that pursuit until 
1929, when he turned his attention to the insurance business, in which he 
engaged for a year. Later he became. his father's successor as justice ot the 
peace, in charge of the police court. Like the others o! the lamiix . He Ins aivvays 
been a stalwart democrat and in 1930 he was elected precinct committeeman, 
holding the office for four years. For two years he was secretary of the town- 
ship organizations. He was appointed acting postmaster on the 1st of March, 
1934. the appointment being confirmed on the 18th of June following. He had 
previously served as a post office clerk for one year under the Wilson regime 
and his experience in that connection well qualified him for his present duties. 
He was one of the organizers of the La Salle County Postmasters Association, 
of which he is now secretary, and he was also one of the organizers and is 
chairman of the membership committee of the Illinois Postmasters Association. 
In 1932 and 1934 lie was a delegate to the democratic state conventions, and he 
attends all county and judicial conventions. 

Mr. McCann belongs to the Sacred Heart Catholic Church and he is a 
grand knight of the Knights of Columbus at La Salle. He gives earnest support 
to any cause which he espouses and his record as a man and as a citizen has 
gained for him the warm regard of all with whom he has been brought in 
contact. 



FRANK 15. SENGER 



Frank B. Senger, chief deputy United States marshal at Danville, with 
offices in the Federal building, was born July 17. 1891. in the city which is still 
his home, his parents being Peter and Frances (Rover) Senger. The father 
came to the United States alone and joined an elder brother, Frederick S-nger, 
who was then a resident of Danville, Illinois, engaged in the harness business. 
Peter Senger was employed for two or three years and then established a busi- 
ness of his own as a shoemaker and dealer in shoes, continuing active in the 
commercial circles of the city until his death, which occurred in 1916. His 
widow survived him for six years, passing away in 1922. 

Frank B. Senger acquired his early education in parochial schools of 
Danville and in the high school, while later he entered Brown's Business Col- 
lege, from which he was graduated in 1908. He was only thirteen years of age, 
however, when he began earning his own living, going to work in order to 
supply the funds that would enable him to pay his tuition fee at the night ses- 
sions of Brown's Business College. Even prior to this time he had carried 
papers when eight years of age. In 1911 he secured a position as collection 
clerk in the Second National Bank and in 1918 he was serving as paying teller 
when he enlisted for service in the World war. He was assigned to duty wPith 
the replacement troops at Camp Gordon. Atlanta. Georgia, where he remained 
until after the armistice was signed, receiving his discharge at Atlanta on the 
11th of December, 1918. 

Mr. Senger then returned to Danville and from January 15. 1919, until 
August 15. 1934. he was auditor and assistant treasurer of the Allith-Prouty 



160 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Company, a builders' hardware manufacturing company. On the 1st of July, 
1934, he was appointed chief United States deputy marshal and to the duties 

ol this position lie has given his undivided attention since Ins retirement from 
business. 

In early manhood Mr. Senger was united in marriage to .Miss Margaret 
Walsh, daughter of .Michael and Ruse (Brophy) Walsh, both of whom are de- 
ceased. .Michael Walsh was a farmer by occupation. Mr. and .Mrs. Senger 
are the parents of two sons: Prank B., -Jr., horn January 23, 1919; and Jack, 
horn August 29, 1H22. .Mi'. Senger belongs to the Benevolent and Protective 
Order ol Elks, being connected with Danville Lodge No. 332. lie is also a 
member of Council No. 754 of the Knights of Columbus, St. Paul's Roman 
Catholic Church and the American Legion Post No. 210. lie has always re- 
sided in Danville, where he is well known, many of his stanchest friends being 
those who have been acquainted with him troin his hoyhood days to the present. 

IIKRBKRT O A KM AX 

Prominent among the democratic leaders of McDonough county is num- 
bered Herbert Oakman, of .Macomb, who is also well known as a representative 
of agricultural interests, having for the past quarter of a century farmed the 
same tract of land. McDonough county numbers him among her native sons, 
Ins birth having occurred in Hire township, September 26, 1876. He is a 
grandson of Isaac A. and Mary E. (Campbell) Oakman, the former a native 
of Pennsylvania, whence he removed westward, establishing his home in Illi- 
nois. For many years he successfully followed farming in Hire township. .Mc- 
Donough county, and he was also active in the public life of the community. 
He voted with the democratic party, served on the board of supervisors and 
was also a school trustee and school director, the cause of education finding 
in him a warm friend. For one term he filled the office of county treasurer of 
McDonough county and lie attended several of the state conventions of his 
party. He held membership in the .Methodist Church and took a very active. 
helpful and prominent part in its work. His son, Frank Oakman, was born in 
Pennsylvania, December 14, 1851, and his life record covered the intervening 
period to the 6th of January, 1!)14, when he passed away. He. too, was a 
farmer of Hire township, McDonough county, throughout practically all of his 
active life, but he spent his last years in Macomb in the enjoyment of a rest 
which he bad truly earned and richly deserved. He was a stanch democrat 
and a faithful follower of the teachings of the Methodist Church. He married 
Henrietta Hammer, who was born in Kentucky, April 6, 1853, and who died in 
September, 1933, when eighty years of age. 

Herbert Oakman attended the rural schools of Hire township and spent 
two years as a student in the Normal Business College at Macomb. He has 
always been identified with agricultural interests and during the past twenty- 
five years has farmed the same place in Scotland township, McDonough county. 
bringing his land under a high state of cultivation, so that lie annually harvests 
good crops. 

On the 15th of May. 1900, Mr. Oakman was united in marriage to Miss 
liessie Runkle and they are the parents of four children, as follows: Helen, 
the wife of A. E. Tanner, of Chicago; Harold: Ralph: and Wayne. The 
religious faith of the family is that of the Methodist Church and Mr. Oakman 
has been an earnest church worker, teaching a class in the Sunday school for 
the past decade. He has also done much to further the interests of the schools. 
has served on the school board for many years and is now a school trustee. 
In politics he has also held to the faith of the family by earnestly supporting 
the democratic party and since 1!>22 he has continuously served as precinct 
committeeman, being reelected every two years. He was also on the executive 
committee from 1924 until 1!»:>4 and he has attended practically all of the state 
conventions since becoming an active party worker. On the 1st of February, 
1!)33, he was appointed maintenance supervisor in the fourth district, in which 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 161 

connection he has .supervision over a territory that comprises five counties. 
His record as a public official is one which commends him to the confidence and 
regard of his fellow townsmen, for he has ever been most loyal to his duties. 

DALLAS YOUNGER LANGLEY 

Dallas Younger Langley, superintendent of the County Home of Sangamon 
county, with residence at Buffalo, was born in Taylorville, Christian county, 
Illinois, October 12, 1882. His parents, Moses D. and Samantha (Rohadamel) 
Langley, were also natives of Illinois, and the father, who was born December 
3, 1849, has devoted his life to farming. He is recognized as a "hard shell" 
democrat and has long been a party leader in his locality but has never aspired 
to office, preferring that his public service shall be done as a private citizen. 
Jn his family were two sons and two daughters : Elto, now Mrs. H. S. Armstrong, 
of Mount Auburn, Illinois; Vivian, the wife of R. Emmett Kelly, of Peoria, 
Illinois ; Dallas Y. ; and Charles Kirkwood, who died at the age of thirty years. 

Dallas Y. Langley attended the rural schools of his native county and also 
the public schools of Taylorville, including the high school. When he had com- 
pleted his education he began working in a hotel in Taylorville and later be- 
came a bartender, being thus employed for four years. Since that time he has 
spent twenty-six years on his farm in Cooper township, Sangamon county, 
near Mechanicsburg, and brought his land under a high state of cultivation, 
the fields producing excellent crops year by year. He still maintains this farm 
in addition to his work as superintendent of the County Home. It was on the 
1st of March, 1934, that Mr. Langley was appointed to his present position and 
he has done excellent service for the public in this connection. He had pre- 
viously been collector of Cooper township for two terms and for some time was 
precinct committeeman. He likewise served on the election board and as judge 
of elections in Cooper township. He belongs to the Roosevelt-Horner Demo- 
cratic Organization and does everything in his power to win legitimate demo- 
cratic victories. 

On the 6th of February, 1909, Mr. Langley was married to Miss Lulu 
Troxell, of Edinburg, Illinois, a daughter of John and Annie (Waters) Troxell, 
the latter a daughter of Daniel Waters, who was a prominent democrat and 
for twenty years served as county supervisor in Sangamon county. Mrs. 
Langley is a member of the Democratic Women's League of this county. By 
her marriage she has become the mother of two sons and a daughter : Byron, who 
is twenty-three years of age and is doing road maintenance work for Sangamon 
county; Charles, twenty-one years of age, who is assistant manager of the 
Majestic Theatre in Springfield; and Louise, aged seventeen, who was gradu- 
ated from the Springfield high school in 1934. The family are members of the 
Methodist Church and have a large circle of warm friends throughout their 
home community. 

GEORGE EDWARD ANDERSON 

Among the public officials of Illinois who have their headquarters in Harris- 
burg is numbered George Edward Anderson, who is associated with the depart- 
ment of labor as a member of the industrial commission. Practically his entire 
life has been spent in this section of the state. He was born near Harrisburg, 
January 15, 1887, and is a son of Sampson A. and Sarah Catherine (Cable) 
Anderson. He attended the Harrisburg public schools and in a competitive 
examination won a scholarship for a two years' course in the Southern Illinois 
State Normal University at Carbondale, where he was a student in 1907 and 
1908. lie taught school in Saline county for three years and subsequently 
spent a year as bookkeeper in the local offices of the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chi- 
cago & St. Louis Railway Company. In 1912 he went with the Saline County 
Coal Company as top foreman and held that position of responsibility for four- 
teen years. In 1927 he began selling insurance ;m<l remained an active worker in 
that field of business until August, 193:!. 



162 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

From the time he attained his majority Mr. Anderson has been a democratic 
voter and his effective work for the party found recognition when in August, 
19;}.'5, he was appointed to the division of industrial commission of the depart- 
ment of labor, with headquarters in Harrisburg. He has since acted in this 
capacity and is systematic and faithful in the discharge of all the duties that 
devolve upon him. He lives upon and superintends his farm near Harrisburg 
and he is a member of the Saline County Employers Association. In the 1932 
campaign he was the first democrat in Saline county to start action in favor of 
the present state slate. He is vice president of the Jeffersonian Club of Harris- 
burg, is chairman of the county central committee and has attended many county 
and state conventions. His labors, whether in office or out of it, have been 
productive of substantial results and as a democratic worker he has largely 
furthered party interests in his section of Illinois. 

In November, 1909, at Benton, Illinois, Mr. Anderson wedded Ora -lane 
Mace and they have five children: Grace, Hallie, -lane, Charles and Wayne. 
Mi'. Anderson belongs to the Masonic fraternity and is considered one of the 
best informed men on the teachings of the craft in southern Illinois. He also 
belongs to the Kiwanis Club and is a loyal follower of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. The rules which have ever governed his conduct have made him a man 
among men, esteemed and honored wherever known and most of all where 
best known. 

WILLIAM ELTON BERRY 

William Elton Berry, postmaster of Zeigler, Franklin county, to which office 
he was appointed in February, 1934, was born in Harrisburg, Saline county. 
Illinois, April 9, 1896. His grandfather, John M. Berry, became an early resi- 
dent of Saline county and engaged extensively in farming. His agricultural 
holdings being among the largest in that section. His son, George F. Berry, who 
was one of a family of eleven children, was born in Saline county, June 1. 1864, 
and he, too, took up the occupation of farming, his work at all times being 
characterized by progressive methods. He is still an active factor in farming 
circles and in politics is an earnest democrat. Three times he has filled the 
office of township highway commissioner and has twice been township supervisor 
in Cottage Grove township. He has also served as chairman of the county board 
of supervisors and as chairman of the county central committee. His wife 
Miriam McKenzie, was born in Saline county, one of a family of nine children 
whose father was a veterinary surgeon who died during the early girlhood of his 
daughter, Mrs. Berry. Both the Berry and McKenzie families were of demo- 
cratic faith. 

William E. Berry completed a high school education in Harrisburg with 
the class of 1916. The following year the I'nited States entered the World war 
and he volunteered five times but each time was rejected on account of the con- 
dition of his eyes. Unable to render his country military aid, he then turned 
to the business world and for four months was employed in a furniture store. 
Later he and his father purchased a half interest in an implement business in 
Harrisburg, which was then conducted under the firm style of Huffman & Berry 
until 1918, when they sold out. William E. Berry next traveled for two years 
I'm- the Bonnell Sales Company of Evansville, and he also owned an interest 
in the business. He likewise handled oil leases and real estate for two years and 
in 1922 removed to Centralia, where he was employed as a representative of the 
Fox Hardwood Lumber Company until 192"), which was the year of his arrival 
in Zeigler. Here he established business on his own account in the production 
and jobbing of mine timbers. This business he still owns, but it is now being 
carried on by his wife, while Mr. Berry gives his attention largely to his duties 
as postmaster, having been appointed to the office in February, 1934. 

In 1917, in Bardwell, Kentuekv, Mr. Berry and Miss Faye Mount were 
married. The lady is a daughter of E. W. Mount, a stock dealer. She was bore 
in Saline countv, Illinois, and has become the mother of two sons: William E.. 




WILLIAM E. BERRY 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 165 

Jr., fourteen years of age; and Robert Erwin, aged ten. The parents are both 
members of the Methodist Church and Mr. Berry is a Mason and a Rotarian. He 
turns to hunting when leisure hours permit and is the owner of fine bird dogs 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Berry are democrats and the latter is very active in the 
women's democratic organizations of southern Illinois. When a boy Mr. Berry 
would drive all day in the mud to aid democratic voters in -jetting to the polls 
He now furnishes his automobile for this purpose and he does everything in 
his power to win legitimate democratic victories, for lie deems the basic principles 
of the party platform vital elements in the promotion of good government. 



THOMAS PATRICK SIXXETT 

Thomas Patrick Sinnett, floor leader of the Illinois house of representatives 
and a member of the legislature from the thirty-third district, is regarded as 
one of the foremost democrats of the state and one who wields a wide influence 
in political circles. He was born on a farm near Hopedale, in Tazewell county. 
Illinois, March 17, 1880, and is a son of Michael and Johanna Sinnett, both of 
whom have passed away. They spent their entire lives in Illinois, where the 
father was a farmer. 

The public school training which Thomas P. Sinnett received was supple- 
mented by study in the Illinois State Normal University, from which institution 
he was graduated in 1904. He next attended the University of Illinois and won 
his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1909. He took a law course in Northwestern Uni- 
versity at Evanston, Illinois, and passed the bar examination without graduating. 
He was admitted to practice in this state in 191'2. For ten years he engaged in 
teaching in the schools of Illinois, spending seven years of that period in the 
Rock Island high school, where his attention was largely devoted to the teaching 
of social science. In 1916 he became United States commissioner and acted in 
that capacity until 1925. He has also been public administrator and he has for 
a number of years been a member of the Illinois legislature, acting as floor leader 
during the session of 1933-34. He has always made a close and earnest study of 
the science of government, delves to the root of the matter in solving intricate 
and involved political problems and presents with clearness and force any subject 
which he discusses before the public. 

In 1912 Mr. Sinnett was united in marriage to Miss Jeannette ('. Connadan, 
who was born near Decatur, Illinois, and who passed away in 192:5, leaving two 
daughters, Mary and Margaret. The family attends St. Joseph's Catholic Church 
and Mr. Sinnett is identified with the Knights of Columbus. He is also an Eagle, 
a Moose, a Modern Woodman and an Elk and is popular in these organizations, 
where his many sterling qualities are recognized by his associates, hi his political 
work he combines practical methods with high ideals and lofty purposes and at 
all times is actuated by unfailing devotion to the most advanced standards of 

citizenship. 

WILLIAM W. HART 

William W. Hart, a well known figure in democratic circles and now secre- 
tary of the Illinois Commerce Commission, is a native of Benton, Franklin 
county, Illinois, and a son of William H. and Mary Ward (East) Hart. His 
father is a distinguished attorney of Benton, and his mother is equally well known 
through her activities in civic affairs and as a past president of the Illinois 
Federation of Women's Clubs. Mr. and Mrs. William II. Hart have a family of 
two sons and two daughters, namely: William W., of this review; Marion M.. 
who married Constance Skinner; Mary, who became the wife of Hubert Tabor, 
of Benton, Illinois; and Mabel, who is the wife of Ellis Krieckhaus, of Boston, 
Massachusetts, and has one child. 

William W. Hart attended the public schools of his native city and was 
graduated from the high school with the class of 1912. He then matriculated 
in the University of Illinois and completed the four-year course in the law de- 
partment by graduation in 1916. Returning to Benton, he entered into partner 



166 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

ship with his father and his brother, Marion M. Hart, the hitter being now state's 
attorney, to which office he was chosen in 1928 and re-elected in 1932. While 
William W. Hart had the benefit of association with his father and his brother, 
he had entered a profession in which advancement depends entirely upon indi- 
vidual effort and steadily lie made progress, continuing in active practice in Ben- 
ton until 1933, when he received appointment to the position of secretary of 
the Illinois Commerce Commission. Mr. Hart has always given his support 
to the democratic party since attaining his majority, has worked in stalwart 
manner for its success and for two terms, from 1930 until 19:54, has been chair- 
man of the Franklin county democratic central committee. 

Mr. Hart married Alberta Andrews, of Benton, Illinois, a daughter of Wil- 
liam and Alberta Andrews, and they have one son, William Ward, Jr. Mr. Hart 
is a member of the Christian Church and in the Masonic fraternity has taken 
the various degrees, becoming a member of the Mystic Shrine. He also belongs 
to the Phi Delta Phi fraternity. Well known in his section of the state, he is 
forging to the front in his profession and in democratic circles as well. 



EDWARD S. COLLINS 

Illinois Democracy has never had a more sincere or loyal adherent than the 
late Edward S. Collins of Morgan county, whose sudden and unexpected death 
occurred on August 28, 1934 while he was dedicating the new grandstand at 
the Morgan County Fair. As manager of the last two Illinois State Fairs, he 
gained unprecedented acclaim from the public and state officials, and for over 
a quarter century he was a devoted and sincere servant of the democratic party. 
The success of the party in recent years in the state of Illinois may largely he 
attributed to such sterling citizens as Mr. Collins in its ranks, who gave not 
only of their unrestrained labor in its behalf, but by their prestige and accom- 
plishments lent character to it, and have brought it to its present elevated plane. 

Mr. Collins was born on a farm near Prentice, in Morgan county, Illinois, 
November 25, 1879, and lived there during his entire life. He was a son of 
Patrick and Mary (Jordan) Collins. Patrick Collins was a native of Ireland and 
came to the United States when he was a boy. He was always a farmer by 
occupation and, like his descendants, gave his political allegiance to the democratic 
party. Mary J. Collins, mother of Edward S., was also born in Ireland, hut 
married Mr. Collins in the United States. 

Edward S. Collins was reared on the home farm, which he owned at the 
time of his death. The public schools of his district provided him with his early 
education, which was supplemented by a course in the Business College at 
Jacksonville. For seven years he was engaged in the grain business in Orleans, 
Morgan county, but thereafter he farmed the old homestead. While living in 
Morgan county, Mr. Collins engaged extensively in farm bureau activities and 
was president of the Morgan Farmers Oil Company. Likewise he was instru- 
mental in the development of the Morgan County Fair. He was secretary of this 
for many years, was president of the association for a long period, and for the 
last three years was a member of the board of directors. 

Merited honor was accorded Mr. Collins on April 6, 1933, when he was 
appointed by Gov. Henry Horner as manager of the Illinois State Fair. It is a 
tribute to his memory that the last two expositions of the Illinois State Fair 
were the most successful in its history. His work in this connection was superla- 
tive, and infinitely satisfactory to all concerned. 

Education was also a matter of heart interest to Mr. Collins, and for six 
years he was a member of the Yatesville School District hoard. Civic affairs and 
the hetterment of community in every way was of pertinent interest to him, and 
his cooperation in such things was consistent. 

Democracy was a vital subject to him from the time he was a very young 
man. He was a true and loyal member of the party for the remainder of his 
life. For twenty-three years, he was a precinct committeeman, and for a number 
of years he was treasurer of the Morgan county democratic central committee. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 167 

In addition to his affiliation with the Illinois State Fair, Mr. Collins for 
the last eight years was a member of the board of directors of the Morgan County 
Fair, which is the second largest in the state in the amount of premiums paid. 
For the past three years, he was secretary of the County Fair Association. His 
regime was characterized by extraordinary financial success. 

Mr. Collins was united in marriage in 1907 to Lillian Mae Pierman of Morgan 
County, and they became the parents of one daughter, Mary Catherine. 

Mr. Collins' death on August 28, 1934, suddenly occurred while he was 
attending the exercises in dedication of a new grandstand at the Morgan County 
Fair. His passing was a severe shock to the countryside, but he has Left a 
memory which is imperishable. In this respect it is appropriate to quote the 
words of Governor Horner, winch were published in the Register at the time of 
Mr. Collins' death : 

"The death of Edward S. Collins is a tremendous shock to me. Only last 
Saturday he stood at my side at the races out at the state fairgrounds. He was 
at the height of enthusiasm, and seemingly in the best of health. 

"Mr. Collins' sterling character and excellent record in the fields of agri- 
culture and business led to his being appointed by me as general manager of 
the Illinois State Fair. That the two expositions held under his direction were 
the most successful in Illinois history will be a lasting tribute to his memory ; 
and his fellow-citizens and his many friends should find consolation in the fact 
that he left us at a time when he was at the climax of his greatest success, flushed 
with happiness over the results of the task which he had so well performed for 
his beloved Illinois. He was an examplar of devoted and conscientious and effec- 
tive public service. I shall sorely and sadly miss him." 

Edward S. Collins was a devoted communicant of the Catholic Church at 
Ashland and belonged to the Jacksonville Lodge of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. His wife and daughter survive him and reside in their home 
about a quarter mile west of Prentice, happy in the loving remembrance of one 
of Illinois' most standi and respected democratic citizens. 



DR. II. C. RINEHART 



One of the most widely-known and reputable veterinary surgeons in the state 
of Illinois and now serving as chief of the state veterinary department is Dr. 11. 
C. Rinehart, a resident of Rushville, Schuyler county. He also is one of the 
democratic party's most loyal adherents and lie has his offices in the Centennial 
Building in Springfield. The doctor is a native of Rushville, his birth having 
occurred there January 1, 1887, his parents being John and Mary Aline (Corbin) 
Rinehart. The father was born in Ohio, of German parentage, and when four 
years of age accompanied his family to Illinois, where he later became a prom- 
inent farmer and stockman. His political faith was that of the democratic party. 
He held a number of public positions, among them township tax collector, school 
director, and member of the county board of supervisors. His death occurred 
August 6, 1929. His wife was born in Schuyler county, Illinois. 

Doctor Rinehart began his education in the public schools of Rushville. 
followed by a course in Kennedy's Normal and Business College there. He then 
entered the Killip Veterinary College in Chicago and from that institution re- 
ceived the M. D. V. degree in 1911. Immediately lie established himself in active 
practice in Rushville and so continued until -Inly 19, 193:5, on which date he was 
appointed chief of the veterinary department of the Illinois state government. 
This department includes a personnel of almost a thousand veterinarians and 
does a vast amount of important work. In his profession Doctor Rinehart lias 
won many other honors and important recognition. For many years he has been 
an assistant state veterinarian. He served one year as secretary of the American 
Veterinarians Association for Illinois, and is now again in this position. He is 
state chairman of the Illinois Democratic Veterinary .Medical Association. The 
doctor is considered one of the foremost authorities in veterinary practice and 



168 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

has always been a thorough studenl of the profession, following closely the modern 
developments. He is a member of the Mississippi Valley Medical Association, the 
Illinois State Medical Association, and the United stales Sanitary Association. 
In public and political affairs of his home county, Doctor Rineharl lias partici- 
pated with the genuine interesl of a true citizen and he lias served as a member 
of the city council of Rushville for two terms. In social and fraternal affairs he 
has likewise 1 a interested, and is a member of the blue lodge and chapter of 

Masons, and the Modern Woodmen of America. 

In the year 1913, Doctor Rineharl took as his wife Miss Dorothy Lamler, a 
member of one of Rushville 's old democratic families. To them have been born 
three children. Morris, the eldest, is now a student in economics at Noi'thwestern 
University; -lames Oliver, second in order of birth, is attending Springfield 

high school; and Betty Lou, the ,v< gest, is at home. Mrs. Rineharl is very 

active in the Presbyterian Church and for ten years was president of the Guild 
in Rushville. she is of old American colonial stock, her great-great-grandfather, 
.James A. Lander, having I n secretary to General George Washington. 



MLS. GARNETT (CARSON) ALDRICH 

No one has been more active in organizing the democratic women of Pulaski 
nty than Mis. Garnetl (Carson) Aldrieh, who became the first president 
E the women'- organization and yet fills the office. Moreover, she is serving 
as master in chancery and is regarded as one of the most prominent representa- 
tives of the democratic party in southern Illinois. She makes her home at 
Villa Ridge and has been a resident of tins state since aboul 1913. She was 
born in Mount Vernon, Indiana, .March 8, 1897, and came with her parents to 
Illinois when sixteen years of aye, the family settling on a farm at Ullin. 

Garnett Carson was graduated from the high school at Ullin with the class 
1914. In the summer of that year she attended the Southern Illinois State 
formal University at Carbondale and from 1914 until 1916 taughl school, being 
eacher at Ullin in 1914, in Alexander county, in 1915 and at Villa Ridge in 
1916. The following year she became the bride of Thomas II Aldrieh, who 
was horn on the farm on which he now lives. Mr. and Mrs. Aldrieh have i n 
son, i art. 

Mrs. Aldrieh did her first party work for Woodrow Wilson when he was a 
candidate for the presidency for the second time. She has always been very 
active in party work and in August, 1932, she was appointed county chairm 

: a very active part in forming the women's organization of Pulaski 
county, was elected its first presidenl and still holds the office. It is believed that 
the women of Pulaski county made possible t he elect ion of a candidate on the demo- 
cratic county ticket. She was the firsl chairwoman in the county to form a wom- 
anization and she was also the first democrat to be elei ti 
master in chancery in Pulaski county, which position she is now 
ceptably filling. For two years she was president of the House of Science Club and 
she belongs to the ' rational Church, in the work of which she has long 

taken an active and helpful interest, formerly teaching a class in the Sunday 
school and cooperating in all of the movements and plans of the church for 
moral uplift and advancement of the community. Mrs. Aldrieh is a member 
'ilia Ridge Rebekah Lodge No. 713, and at present noble grand, and a member 
Royal I /odgi al I Ml in. J [er worth in e erj field to which 

er activities is widely acknowledged and she is regarded as one of the 
omen of her section of 1 he state. 

CHARLES -I. LORCH 

Pre ! of Illinois den rati is C. J. Lorch, of Springfield, 

now holds the res] I ition of assistant state purchasing agent, a 

liich lie has won in the slate administrative system through the efficient 

' Ids duties in varii i tions during the preceding years. Mr. 




MRS. GARNETT (CARSON) ALDRICII 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 171 

Lorch is a native of Worden, Madison county, Illinois, born July 30, 1879, and is 
a son of Killian Lorch, who was born in Louisiana and was a stanch democrat. 
He served as a village clerk and in other public capacities. His wife was before 
their marriage Ada Handshy. She was a sister of Fred Handshy, known as a 
leading democrat of the state, and for his association with the Illinois Traction 
Company of East St. Louis. 

C. J. Lorch attended the Lutheran schools and subsequently was a student 
in the high school of Edwardsville. When he was fourteen years old, he went 
to Forrest, Illinois, to live with an uncle, who was a train dispatcher, and in that 
city he continued his high school studies. He took a course in the Brown Business 
College of Decatur and there won record honors in mastering shorthand. In 
fact, during his youthful years, Mr. Lorch manifested extraordinary ability in 
his educational work, and when only thirteen years of age was a correspondent 
for the Edwardsville paper owned by Charles Boeschenstein. He first started 
work at Decatur. Illinois, with the Wabash Railroad as a clerk for Edward 
Shelah, who was engineer of maintenance of way. From this point he progressed 
steadily. He was promoted to the trainmaster's office, then to the chief dispatch- 
er's office, then to the superintendent's office, and in 1904 lie was appointed 
chief clerk in the general claim department under Bryant C. Winston, a lifelong 
democrat. In 1909 Mr. Lorch made an important change in his vocation by re- 
signing from the railroad service and coming to Springfield. He entered the state 
house as a stenographer under Governor Deneen, and in 1917 he became assistant 
purchasing agent under the civil administration code. During the administration 
of Governor Emmerson, he was in charge of the general office in the department 
of purchases and construction and on July 1, 1933, when this department was 
abolished, he became an employee of the department of waterways. Finally, in 
January, 1934, he was appointed assistant purchasing agent under Maxwell S. 
Bibo. Mr. Lorch 's long connection with the various departments of public service 
most convincingly proves his ability in such work and his thorough and intimate 
knowledge of the complexities therein. 

On August 24, 1907, Mr. Lorch was married to Violet Grace George, of 
Springfield, Illinois, a daughter of John P. George. To their union there has 
been born one son. Charles, who graduated from the Springfield high school and 
is now a student at Illinois College in Jacksonville. Mrs. Lorch takes an active 
part in social and welfare work; is a member of the circle of the Old Ladies' 
Home, and of St. PaiU's Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Lorch has attained the thirty-second degree in Masonry, belonging to 
the blue lodge, chapter, council, commandery, consistory, the Mystic Shrine, and 
the Jesters in Springfield. His talents in music are widely known, and in this 
art he has organized and trained the Ansar Shrine band and also the Springfield 
Consistory band. Mr. Lorch 's citizenship has been one of unquestioned loyalty 
and observance of his duties as a member of the community, and he lias won 
manv friends therebv. 



THOMAS A. BOLGER 

Thomas A. Bolger, a member of the state legislature, representing the eighth 
district in the lawmaking body of Illinois, was born April 20, 1887, on the farm 
where he now lives in Xunda township. McHenry county, his parents being Walter 
and Ellen (Knox) Bolger. He attended the schools of his native township and 
afterward became a pupil in the high school at McHenry, from which he was 
graduated in 1902. He next entered the Ellis Business College of Elgin, in which 
he completed his course in 1908. He was employed in the Citizens State Bank 
at McHenry when his father died in 1914, at which time he returned to the home 
farm, whereon he has since lived, his time and attention being largely given to 
the further cultivation of the fields and the development of the property. 

On the 18th of November, 1915, Mr. Bolger was united in marriage to Miss 
Grace Doherty and they are the parents of ten children, namely, Vivian. Eleanore, 
Walter, Mabel, Thomas, William. Lillian. Anna, Margaret and Rita. 



172 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Mr. Bolger has always been interested in polities since his high school days 
and for four years he served as a member of the board of review of Mellenry 
county. lie has also been a member of the local school board for several years. 
In 1928 he was made the democratic nominee for the state legislature but was 
defeated. Iii 1930 he again became a candidate, was elected, was re-elected in 
1932 and in 1934 once more became a candidate without opposition. His legisla- 
tive record is commendable, for he has done important service for his party and 
the state at large, being a stanch advocate of those causes in which he has faith 
as factors in good government. lie was also appointed a member of the milk 
investigating commission. He is a communicant of the Catholic Church and 
fraternally is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus and the Foresters. He is 
genial, kindly and well poised, with a keen intellect that results in clear insight 
into important problems. 

DARCE FIELDS RUMSEY 

On the 5th of June, 1933, Darce Fields Rumsey was elected to the bench of 
the first judicial circuit of Illinois, and as judge of this district he is fully 
justifying the confidence and support of his fellow townsmen who placed him in 
office. His experience at the bar covers a period of nineteen years and in his 
practice he has displayed comprehensive familiarity with legal principles, to- 
gether with a lack of bias in forming opinions and in presenting his cause before 
the courts. 

Judge Rumsey makes his home in Harrisburg and is a native son of Illinois, 
his birth having occurred in Eddyville, October 10, 1885, his parents being Fields 
and Martha Rumsey. In the grade schools of Pope county he pursued his early 
education, which he supplemented by study in the .Southern Illinois State 
Teachers College at Carbondale. He afterward took both literary and law courses 
in University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and was graduated in 1913, at which 
time the LL. B. degree was conferred upon him. He has practiced his profession 
continuously since 1915 and before the courts was always regarded as a strong, 
forceful and resourceful law-yer who ever closely studied his cases and was 
prepared not only for the expected but also for the unexpected, which happens 
quite as frequently in the courts as out of them. He served as state's attorney 
of Saline county from 1928 until 1932. 

On the 10th of October, 1917, in Harrisburg, Illinois, Judge Rumsey was 
married to Miss Edith II. Webster and they have many friends in the city where 
they make their home. The religious faith of Judge Rumsey is indicated by his 
membership in the First Presbyterian Church of Harrisburg, while fraternally 
he is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He belongs 
to the Kiwanis Club and is interested in all that has to do with civic welfare or 
with the improvement of the general conditions that surround the individual 
and retard or advance his opportunities. In voting he has given his support 
to the democratic party and has taken an active part in the campaigns since 1916, 
frequently addressing the public on the vital questions and problems of the day. 
He has always kept well informed concerning political issues and is at all times 
able to support his position by intelligent argument. 



ROBERT M. HARPER 

Robert M. Harper has the distinction of owning and editing the only demo- 
cratic paper in Rock Island county, the East Moline Herald, and he has made 
it an influential factor in political circles in northwestern Illinois. A native of 
Monmouth, this state, he was born December 17, 1891, of the marriage of Charles 
A. and Anna D. (MacMillan) Harper, the latter now deceased. The father, 
who was a foundry superintendent for many years, is now living retired and 
well merits the rest which he is enjoying. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 173 

Robert M. Harper studied in the Monmouth high school and afterward 
attended the University of Washington at Seattle, where he pursued a course 
in journalism. In 1913 he became identified with the East Moline Herald and 
later purchased the paper, of which he has since been editor and owner. As 
the only democratic sheet of Rock Island county it exerts a widely felt influence 
over public thought and action, and Mr. Harper uses its columns to further the 
growth ami development of the party and win successes for its candidates. He 
has served on the democratic committee of East Moline, has been secretary and 
also treasurer of the county central committee and was a candidate for state 
senator. There is also an interesting military chapter in his life record, for he 
joined the army in -June, 1918, and served until December, 1919, becoming a 
sergeant and lecturer in the Motor Transport Corps, lie has membership in 
the American Legion. 

On the 1st of June. 1916, Mr. Harper was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret Sackville. He belongs to the Catholic Church, the Knights of Columbus, 
tlie Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Fraternal Order of Eagles, 
while along strictly social lines he has connection with the Short Ilill Country 
Club, lie is popular among his many friends and is one of the best known 
residents of East Moline. where as a newspaper publisher and as a citizen he 
has high rank. 



JOSEPH F. BARTLEY 



Among the recognized leaders of the Peoria bar is numbered Joseph F. 
Bartley, whose recognition of and loyalty to the high standards and ethics of the 
profession have resulted in winning for him the enviable place that he now fills. 
His record is such that Peoria is proud to number him among her native sons. 
He was born December 17, 1885, his parents being Patrick ami Margaret (Hayi :s 
Bartley. The father was born in La Porte, Indiana, a son of John and Mary Bart- 
ley. The former came from Ireland and established his home on a farm near 
La Porte, Indiana, where his remaining days were passed. At the time of the 
Civil war he responded to the country's call for troops and joined the IV 
army, with which he saw active service at the front. To him and his wife were 
born six sons, two of whom, James and John, became residents of Chicago. 
Margaret (Hayes) Par! ley. mother of Joseph F. Bartley, was a daughter of 
Edward and Margaret Hayes. Her father was likewise a native of i aid 

Isle ami on coming to the new world settled on a farm north of Detroit, Michigan. 
Edward and Margaret Bayes wi re the parents of seven children, their daughter, 
Margaret, becoming the wife of Patrick Bartley. They were married in Mar- 
quette, Michigan, and established their home in Urbana, Illinois. Patrick Bartlej . 
who was a master boilermaker, occupied a responsible position in the railroad 
shops until 1885, when the family settled in Peoria. The children were John 
J.. Mary L., Helen ('., Genevieve, Peter E., William A. and Joseph F. 

The last named pursued h s education in the Peoria schools and in the 
Bradley Polytechnic Institute, where he spent six years. When his more speci- 
fically literary course was completed lie determined to take up the study of law and 
to this end entered the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he was 
graduated with the LL. B. degree in 1908. Admitted to the bar. he entered upon 
active practice the same year in Peoria as an associate of Joseph A. Weil. About 
four years later they formed a partnership which continued until 1931 when 
Mr. Bartley entered into partnership with Herbig Younge under the firm name 
of Bartley & Younge. Mr. Bartley has continuously practiced since 1908 

a quarter century, and his record is one of steady 
advancement, so that his name i- closely associated with many of the mosl im- 
portant cases that have appeared in the courts here. There is no requ 
successful law practice that lias not been displayed in his active and us< il 
r. winning for him a place of leadership i i's attorneys. 

Mr. Bartley was married to Mi-- Mi of Pekin, Illinois, a daughter 



174 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

of Jacob and .Mary (Herbig) Saal. They have three children: Margaret and 
Joseph P., who arc attending the University of Michigan, and Thomas S. who is 
attending Spalding Institute of Peoria. The family is very prominent in Catho- 
lic circles ami Mr. Hartley belongs to the Knights of Columbus, in which he is 
past grand knight. He also served as district deputy in that order and in 1931 
lie was made a Knight of St. Gregory by Pope Pius XI, being the only individual 
so honored in this diocese. In politics he lias always been a consistent democrat 
and a loyal party worker, but the honors and emoluments of office have had no 
attraction for him. lie upholds the political principles in which he believes 
through intelligent argument and by his support at the ballot box, but he con- 
centrates his efforts and attention largely upon his professional interests and is 
a member of the Peoria, Illinois State and American bar associations. 



ADOLPH J. SCHUESSLER 

With the industrial development of Madison county Adolph J. Schuessler 
of Alton has been closely identified and is now the active head of the Schuessler 
Foundry Company, which has forty employes. A native of Belleville, St. Clair 
county, Illinois, he was born September 4, 188)5. and is a son of Nicholas and 
Mary (Nering) Schuessler, both of whom were natives of this state. The father 
became a building contractor, following that line of business in Belleville. He 
gave his political allegiance to the democratic party and his brother George 
was very active in party affairs. 

At the usual age Adolph J. Schuessler became a public school pupil in his 
native city and passed through consecutive grades to the high school. In young 
manhood he started work in a foundry, learned the trade and by his thorough- 
ness, reliability and enterprise worked his way upward until in a comparatively 
brief time he was made foreman. At the age of twenty-five years he accepted 
the superintendence' of the Belleville Foundry Company and conducted its 
business for eight years, during which time he put the enterprise firmly on 
its feet financially. In 1913 he removed to Alton, where he built his present 
foundry, establishing a business which has become one of the important pro- 
ductive industries of the city. He had been very successful while in Belleville 
in making glass bottle molds ami he came to Alton at the solicitation of the 
Illinois Class Company. The Schuessler Foundry Company is a close lamily 
corporation and furnishes employment to forty people, who, under the direction 
of Adolph J. Schuessler, are turning out work that makes this one of the 
profitable business concerns of the city. 

In 1906 Mr. Schuessler was married to Miss Helen Mountain, a native of 
New Jersey, who completed her education in Indiana as a student in St. Mary 
of the Woods Academy. Their children are: Helen, now Mrs. J. Scott, of Phila- 
delphia ; and Adolph, Jr., a student in the University of Chicago, where he is 
well known as a football player, being half back on the university team, while 
in Alton he was captain of the high school team. Mrs. Schuessler is active in 
church and social circles. Mr. Schuessler belongs to the Knights of Columbus 
and to the Elks lodge, in which he was exalted ruler in 1928. He also has 
membership in the Madison Country Club and greatly enjoys golf, hunting and 
fishing, his recreation along these lines constituting an even balance to his 
intense business activity. 



JOHN B. FELMLEY 



John B. Felmley, secretary of the J. L. Simmons Company of Bloomington, 

also figures actively in local politics as chairman of the Young Democratic Club 
of McLean county. He was born in Normal, McLean county, Illinois, June 27. 
1895, his parents being David and Auta (Stout) Felmley. the former a native 
of New Jersey, while the latter was born in Ohio and reared at Carrollton. 
David Felmley. who spent practically his entire life in Normal, Illinois, was 
president of the Illinois State Normal University for thiity years. A prominent 




ADOLPH J. SCHT'ESSLER 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 177 

educator, he was a candidate for the office of state superintendent of schools in 
1898, and he was long- an active worker in the local ranks of the democratic party. 

John B. Felmley began his education as a grammar school pupil of Normal 
and continued his studies at the University high school there. In 1920, when a 
young man of twenty-five years, he was graduated from the architectural en- 
gineering department of the University of Illinois. In June, 1917, he had entered 
the United States Navy Reserve Force and was stationed at Great Lakes, Illinois, 
as a warrant officer in charge of public works until honorably discharged in 
July, 1919, when he returned to college. It was while attending school that he 
began the athletic career which has made his name a familiar one throughout 
the state. He played on the navy team at Great Lakes and was also a member of 
the basketball team at the University of Illinois for three years. Following his 
graduation lie was connected with the Mississippi Valley Structural Steel Cam- 
pany in 1920 and 1921 and in the latter year became identified with the J. L. 
Simmons Company of Bloomington in the capacity of general superintendent, 
thus serving until 1926. Since that year he has held the official position of 
secretary of the company and his efforts have constituted an important factor 
in the steady expansion and success of the business. 

On the 12th of February, 1924, Mr. Felmley was united in marriage to 
Estella Hixon, of Evansville, Indiana. He is a member of Delta Epsilon, has 
attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in the Masonic fraternity 
and is also affiliated with the Loyal Order of Moose. His religious faith is indi- 
cated by the membership in the Unitarian Church, of which he is a director. He 
is likewise a member of the American Legion, the Illinois Society of Engineers 
and the McLean County Farm Bureau. Interested in politics since attaining 
his majority, Mr. Felmley became a member of the democratic county committee 
in 1932 and is also serving on its executive committee. He organized and became 
chairman of the Young Democratic Club of McLean county, a strong political 
group of twenty-one hundred members. In the 1934 primary, he was a candidate 
for congress from the seventeenth Illinois congressional district. 



W. J. REARDON 



W. J. Reardon, elected judge of the county court of Tazewell county in 1934. 
has back of his judicial service long and valuable experience as a member of 
the bar, so that his highly developed powers in the line of his profession well 
qualify him for his work on the bench. He was born on a farm in Tazewell county 
in June, 1878, a son of Bryan and Anna (Fleming) Reardon, natives of Ireland, 
the former born in Tipperary and the latter in County Waterford. The paternal 
grandfather was Daniel Reardon, who came with his family to the United States 
in 1850, settling in Providence, Rhode Island, but a short time afterward remov- 
ing to Delavan Prairie, Illinois, where he established his home on a farm. His 
wife bore the maiden name of Margaret Keefe. The maternal grandfather of 
Judge Reardon was Thomas Fleming, who died in Ireland, but the others of the 
family came to Illinois in 1857. Captain John Reardon, an uncle of the Judge, 
served in the Civil war, and another uncle, Edward Reardon, filled the office 
of state's attorney of Tazewell county from 1880 to 1884. In the family of Bryan 
and Anna Reardon were eight sons, five of whom are living, as follows: YV. .1., 
M. D., 0. II., C. C. and Mieael. Gerald Reardon, deceased, was an attorney of 
Jerseyville, Illinois. E. E. Reardon, who has also passed away, was the first 
district attorney in Oklahoma City. 

W. J. Reardon, after attending high school in Delavan, Illinois, entered the 
University of Nebraska, where he pursued his law course, receiving the LL 15. 
degree. He first practiced in East St. Louis and then removed to Pekin, where 
he soon gained rank as an able attorney, his ability winning him leadership at 
the Tazewell county bar. In 1908 he was elected state's attorney and tilled the 
office for eight years, retiring in 191(5. From 1918 until 1922 he was state central 
committeeman from the sixteenth congressional district, and he has attended all 



178 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

the democratic state conventions in the lasl twenty years as a delegate or visitor. 
He was signally honored in 1934 when lie was elected to the bench of the county 
court and the public has implicit faith in his ability to conduct the trial of cases 
in a fair and impartial manner. Prior to his taking the bench, however, on No- 
vember 16, 1934, Judge .1. T. Culbertson, the incumbent of the county bench, be- 
came a judge of the circuit court and Judge Reardon was accordingly com- 
missioned by Governor Horner to till out Judge Culbertson \s unexpired term 
before assuming the bench by his own elective right. Before taking his seat, 
Judge Reardon was also attorney for the Home Owners' Loan Corporation. 

In early manhood. Judge Reardon was united in marriage to Miss Marie 
Albertson, a native of Pekin, Illinois, and a daughter of V. J. and Sophia (Koch) 
Albertson. Fraternally the judge is connected with the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He has always concentrated his time and attention on 
his profession, making the interests of his clients his first consideration, and so 
he won the respect and confidence of the men and women who voted him to his 
present responsible and dignified position. 



CHARLES L. HODGE 



Charles L. Hodge, who was appointed postmaster of Mason in June, 1933, 
was born in Effingham county, Illinois, September 5, 1894, a son of George 
ami Sarah E. (Andrews) Hodge. The father was born in White county, Illinois, 
where his people settled in pioneer times. He was long connected with the 
maintenance department of the Illinois Central System but is now living 
retired, making his home in Mason. He has always voted with the democratic 
party. His wife was born in Effingham county in 1858, her people having come 
here during the period of early settlement, after which they took active and 
prominent part in the work of development and progress. Her father, Thomas 
Andrews, was also active in democratic politics, working earnestly to win 
success for the party and its candidates, and on various occasions he held 
township offices. 

At the usual age Charles L. Hodge became a pupil in the public schools of 
.Mason, continuing his studies through the various grades until he became a 
high school student. After his textbooks were put aside he held various clerical 
positions with construction companies, being thus employed until 1929. He 
was appointed acting postmaster June 1, 1933, and his appointment was con- 
tinned February 16, 1934. Since of age he has been an earnest worker in the 
democratic ranks, has attended various local meetings of the party, is a 
member of the Jeffersonian Club and for five years filled the office of town 
clerk of Mason. He was also clerk of the town board for several years and 
has been most faithful and loyal in the discharge of his official duties. He has 
ever maintained high standards of public service and therefore it was a matter 
of general satisfaction to his fellow townsmen when he was appointed post- 
master of Mason. 

In 1920 Mr. Hodge was united in marriage to Miss Jessie Nave, a native 
of Effingham county, Illinois, and a daughter of Edward and Mattie (Ander- 
son) Nave, who were pioneer farming people of this county. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hodge are the parents of two children, Charileen and Georgie Allen. Mrs. 
Hodge, like her husband, is an advocate of democracy and is a member of the 
Jeffersonian Club. 



W. D. BAINE 



W. D. Baine, who is now chief bank examiner of the state of Illinois, is 
eminently fitted for this responsible position by long years of training in banking 
and finance, and during the times of economic stress his ability and judgment 
have been of particular value. His services have been regarded with pride by 
his fellow members of the state democratic party. 

Mr. Baine was born in Grand Rapids, [Michigan, on the 17th of August, 1889, 




CHARLES L. HODGE 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 181 

and is a son of William and Margaret (Grimes) Baine. The father, who was 
born in Rochester, New York, was a manufacturer of refrigerators and refrigera< 

tion equipment, and was a democrat of the first rank. 

The family moved to Chicago when W. D. Baine was nine years of age, ami 
the public schools there supplied him with his educational opportunities until 
he graduated from the John Marshall high school. He started in business life 
as a messenger in the First National Bank of Chicago. For twenty-three years 
he was associated with this large institution and was steadily advanced until he 
attained the position of assistant auditor. In 1931 he left the bank on leave of 
absence for the purpose of becoming chief revenue clerk in the state treasurer's 
office under Edward T. Barrett. When the latter became auditor, Mr. Baine was 
appointed chief bank examiner of Illinois, a position which he has filled with 
ability. In his department, eighteen examiners work out of Springfield, twenty- 
four out of Chicago, and fifteen in the northern district. His adm nistration of 
banking affairs in Illinois lias covered' the most strenuous financial period, and 
the present good condition of the Illinois banks is a mosl convincing indication 
of the efficiency of the department. Out of the seven hundred and three banks 
which were closed at the time of the moratorium of .March 4, 1933, six hundred 
and fourteen are now (April, l!i:!4> open and in first class condition. Without 
exception, every one of these banks which have applied for federal deposit insur- 
ance have been accepted, and ninety-eight per cent of the deposits of banks are 
now available. Mr. Bain became actively interested in democratic affairs under 
the recommendation of the late Melvin A. Traylor, eminent Chicago banker, 
and was one of the leading workers in the political campaign of Edward T. 
Barrett. No party has ever faced a more serious test and problem than did the 
democratic after the election of Franklin D. Roosevelt to the presidency, and the 
party is justifiably pro.ud of such men in ils ranks as W. D. Baine. who, by 
their sheer courage and intelligent procedure, are guiding the party to victory. 

In the year 1915, Mr. Bame was married to Miss Mary W. Horan, of < Jhicago, 
Illinois. He is a member of the Knights of Columbus. Mr. Baine 's office is in 
the state capitol building in Springfield, but his residence address is ( !ook county, 
Illinois. 



HARRY L. PATE 



Harry L. Pate, of Tuscola, who is filling the office of state's attorney of 
Douglas county, and is a well known member of the bar, was born in Franklin 
County, Illinois, November 23, 1906. His parents, Lenious A. and Phemia 
'Williams! Pate, are natives of Kentucky, whence they came to Illinois in the 
early 'It'is, settling fir i in Williamson county and subsequently in Franklin 
county, where the father is employed as a salesman. He has always vote:! the 
democratic tickel and has ever given stalwart support to the party principles. 

At the usual age Harry L. Pate entered the public schools and afterward 
attended high school at Sesser, Illinois. He also spent two years as a student 
in McKendree College at Lebanon, this state, and then matriculated in the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, where h. pursued bis law course and was graduated in 1930, 
at which time the LL. B. degree was conferred upon him. The same year he 
was admitted to the bar and began practice in Villa Grove, Douglas county, 
where he l'emaiiied until November 8, 1932. He had been elected state's attorney 
on the 8th of November. 1932, and in consequence removed to Tuscola, the county 
seat. His term of office will continue until 1936 and he is rendering cap. 

■ , - the incumbent in thai position, faithfully protecting the legal interests 
county. 

Mr. Pate has been active in democratic politics since reaching the agi 
twenty-one yeai's and wa I ed senatorial committeeman of the thirty-fourth 
senatorial district. Since 1930 he has been a delegate to all congre I and 

judicial conventions and he is frequently heard as a campaign peal >r upport- 

the entire ticket. In 1932 he organized the Jefferson Club of Douglas county. 



182 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

of which he is the president and which lias a membership of five hundred. Ili^ 
fellow officers are Clyde Larimer, who is the secretary, and Dr. Myron Boylson, 
who is treasurer. 

In 1929 Mr. Pate was united in marriage to Miss Marguerite .Joyce, a native 
of Douglas county, Illinois, and a daughter of Edward and Rose (Brick) Joyce, 
representing pioneer democratic families of this part of the state. Mrs. Pate 
is also active in the democratic party and belongs to the .Jeffersonian Club and 
the Douglas County Women's Democratic Club. Mr. Pate holds membership 
in the Masonic Lodge and belongs to the Phi Kappa Delta, a national forensic 
fraternity, and the Sigma Delta Kappa, a legal fraternity. His interest in 
community welfare is indicated in his connection with the Chamber of Com- 
merce of Tuscola and witli the Rotary Club. Along strictly professional lines 
he is connected witli the Douglas County and Illinois State Par Associations 
and is a member of the executive committee of the Illinois States Attorneys 
Association. He holds to high standards in his profession and conducts his prac- 
tice alone most ethical lines. 



LOUIS F. REINHOLD 



Louis F. Reinhold, who is now state's attorney in Freeport, Stephenson 
county, Illinois, is known as a representative member of the democratic party in 
Illinois and holds an enviable reputation in his home county and district. 

Mr. Reinhold was born in Freeport, April 17, 1890 and is a son of Edward 
and Henderika (Billker) Reinhold, the former a native of Baltimore, Maryland, 
and the latter of Emden, Germany. The father was for many years in the real 
estate and insurance business in Freeport and also engaged in the cigar manu- 
facturing business. He was a democrat in his political allegiance and was 
active in the support of the party. 

Louis F. Reinhold graduated from the high school in Freeport in 1910, 
then attended the University of Wisconsin for one year. After completing his 
studies, he became associated with the law firm of Witte & Manus, and in April, 
1914, was admitted to the state bar of Illinois. He started practice for himself 
in the same year. From 1914 until 1916, he was assistant states attorney, and in 
1917 was elected city attorney of Freeport, which office he retained until 1919. 
He has been engaged in the general practice alone since 1917, although in 1928 
he was chosen as states attorney, and re-elected in 1932. He has served on the 
democratic central committee of Stephenson county and has in every possible 
way contributed his support to the party. 

Mr. Reinhold was married August 21, 1923, to Miss Ada L. Folgate. The 
religious connection of Mr. Reinhold is with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and 
his fraternal affiliations are with the Masonic Order, in which he has attained 
the thirty-second degree, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. 



EUGENE R. SCHWARTZ 

Eugene R. Schwartz, of Naperville, who has the distinction of being the 
youngest chairman of a county central committee in the state, is now filling the 
position of superintendent of registration in the department of registration and 
education at Springfield. He was born in Naperville, Du Page county, Illinois, 
April 16, 1904, a son of Charles L. and Olive (Dieter) Schwartz, who were also 
natives of Naperville, where the father engaged in the retail lumber business 
for a number of years. He passed away February 10, 1930, his wife surviving 
until September 11, 1933. 

After attending the public schools of Naperville, Eugene R. Schwartz 
entered the University of Notre Dame and received his Civil Engineer degree 
at his graduation in 1927. He then entered into business with his father ami 
continued actively in the lumber trade until June, 1933, when he was appointed 
stale superintendent of registration, with offices in Springfield. He first became 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 183 

interested in politics in 1!)24. His father was chairman of the county central 
committee of Du Page county and was a candidate for the office of county sur- 
veyor. Following the death of his father, Eugene R. Schwartz succeeded him as 
chairman of the county committee and has thus continued to the present time. He 
has been a delegate to four state conventions and has attended three national 
conventions — at New York city in 1924, Houston, Texas, in 1928, and Chicago 
in 1932. lie was filling the office of county chairman when the first democratic 
candidate in Du Page county was elected circuit judge in 1933 and when Governor 
Horner carried Du Page county, being the first democratic candidate for chief 
executive to win a majority in that county. In 1930 there were only four hundred 
and forty-one democratic ballots cast at the primary. In 1932 there were about 
forty-four hundred and sixty and in 1934 twelve thousand, three hundred and 
seventy-five, showing the steady, continuous and substantial growth of democracy 
in Du Page county, which had previously been a very strong republican county. 
There are seventy-eight precincts in the county and under the guidance of Mr. 
Schwartz the work of the party has been thoroughly organized and systematized. 
On the 27th of April, 1929, Mr. Schwartz was married to Virginia Krafthefer, 
a daughter of James M. and Marguerite (Kelly) Krafthefer, who are residents 
of Wilmette, Illinois, her father being with the Pennoyer Merchants Transfer 
Company. Mr. and Mrs. Schwartz have a daughter, Virginia M., now four 
years of age. They are widely and favorably known in Xaperville, where Mr. 
Schwartz has always resided, and his friends throughout the state in democratic 
circles are constantly increasing as his acquaintance broadens. 

ALVIN W. AHRENS 

Alvin W. Ahrens, coroner of Logan county, has been connected with the 
Sheets undertaking establishment of Lincoln during the past decade. He is 
a popular young native son of Lincoln, Illinois, born September 29, 1902. his 
parents being Albert and Caroline (Sehaffenacker) Ahrens, who were also 
born in this state. Albert Ahrens is a prominent figure in financial circles of 
his community as president of the Lincoln State Bank and has also been an 
active worker in the local ranks of the democratic party for many years. He 
is now a member of the democratic county committee, on which he has 
served intermittently for twenty years, and has likewise been a member of the 
county board of supervisors for several terms. William Sehaffenacker, brother 
of Mi's. Ahrens, served as sheriff of Logan county for three terms, having been 
elected to the office on the democratic ticket. 

Alvin W. Ahrens attended the parochial and public schools of his native 
city and was graduated from the Lincoln high school with the class of 1921. 
He is also a graduate of the Lincoln Business College. He was manager of a 
glove factory in Lincoln for a brief period prior to serving a year's apprentice- 
ship in the Sheets undertaking parlors of this city. Subsequently he attended 
the Worsham College of Embalming in Chicago, becoming a licensed embalmer 
in 1924, and during the past ten years he has been continuously identified in 
that capacity with the Sheets funeral establishment of Lincoln. Elected coroner 
of Logan county in 1932, he has since filled the position in a most acceptable 
and very efficient manner. 

On the 7th of October, 1928, Mr. Ahrens was united in marriage to Jane 
Mason, of Armington. Illinois, who is a member of the Delphi Club and became 
its president in Lincoln. Mr. Ahrens belongs to the Kiwanis Club, is active 
in membership promotion and was a delegate to its state convention at Bloom- 
ington in 1933. He is also a member of the Logan County Young Democratic 
Club and the United States Army Reserve. Fraternally he is affiliated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks and the following Masonic bodies : Lincoln Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; Lincoln 
Chapter, R. A. M. ; and Constantine Commandery, K. T., being chosen com- 
mander of the last named for the year 1935. He belongs also to the Ancient 
Order of Anubus. 



1M ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 



CLARENCE DAWKELL MI'KIMIV 



Clarence Darrell Murphy, attorney ;it Law practicing at the Peoria bar and 
who was a candidate l'<>r the office of county judge on the democratic ticket in 
L934, was I in mi in ( 'ulta. Fulton county, Illinois, ( >ctober 28, 1884, a son of James 
W. and Anna (Deiken) Murphy. The father, also a native of Cuba, this state, 
was a son of Abraham and Sarah (Henderson) Murphy, The grandfather was 
likewise horn in Cuba and was a son of William and Margarel Murphy. It was 
in the year 1831 that William Murphy removed from Lima, Ohio, to Fulton 
county, Illinois, settling on a tract of land about two miles west of Cuba, and 
there developed a farm which has remained in possession of the family to the 
present time, being now the property of -James W. Murphy. The latter married 
Anna Deiken, daughter of .Justice and Elizabeth (Staulter) Deiken, who were 
representative farming people of Fulton county, making their home near Cuba, 
and who had come to the middle west from Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
To -lames W. and Anna Murphy were born six children, as follows: Loren E., 
of Monmouth, Illinois, who is circuit judge of the ninth circuit; Clarence D., 
nf this review; Alta, the wife of W. M. Nelemns; Ray, a farmer by occupation; 
Marie, a school teacher of Cuba, Illinois; and Mrs. Ruth Hawkins, who teaches 
school at Harrisburg, this state, and is the wife of Everett Hawkins, a contractor 
of Harrisburg, Illinois. 

The educational opportunities enjoyed by Clarence D. Murphy were those 
afforded by the graded and high schools of Cuba and the University of Michigan, 
which he entered as a law student in 1905. He was graduated with the class of 
1908 and in the same year was admitted to the bar and began practice with 
George Jochem id' Peoria, ('lose application, thorough preparation and devotion 
to the interests of his clients brought him a constantly growing practice and in 
1912 he was appointed ass ; stant state's attorney, which position he occupied 
until 1920. In that year ho resumed the private practice of law but was again 
called to become a nominee for office when in 1934 the democratic party placed 
his name on its ticket for the position of county judge. He had previously been 
the democratic nominee for state's attorney and had run Ear ahead of his ticket 
at the following election. 

Mr. Murphy was married October 17. 1911, to Miss [sabelle Buck, who was 
born and reared in Peoria, a daughter of William -I. and Harriett (Houghteling) 
Buck, her father a retired farmer of Peoria county. Mi-, and Mrs. Murphy have 
one child, Ellen. Mi-. Murphy is a Mason and has taken the higher degrees of 
the fraternity, having membership in Peoria Consistory and in Mohammed Tem- 
ple of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of the Peoria Bar Association and 
he enjoys the respect and confidence of his fellow practitioners by reason of 
his close conformity to the highest ethical standards of his calling. 



MYRON A. WARNES 



Myron A. Warnes, who throughout his entire life has been active in the 
financial field, is now receiver for two banking institutions at Lincoln. He 
was born in Longview, Champaign county. Illinois, November 15, 1904, his 
parents being George and Mabel (Anderson) Warnes, also natives of this 
state. The father is a farmer by occupation. 

Myron A. Warnes attended the district schools of Douglas county and the 
high school at Longview, after which he entered the University of Illinois, where 
he pursued a course in accountancy. For a year thereafter he occupied a 
clerical position in the Champaign National Mank and then entered the First 
National Mank of Tuscola, where he remained for two years as a clerk, after 
which he was made assistant cashier and occupied the position until October, 
1933. He was then appointed receiver of the Newman National Mank at New- 
man. Illinois, where he continued until May, 1934, when he was appointed 
receiver of the Lincoln National Mank. In August of the same year he was also 
appointed receiver for the American National Mank of Lincoln and is now 




CLARENCE D. MURPHY 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 187 

acting in both capacities. His long experience in practical banking well 
qualities him for the duties that now devolve upon him and he is making an 
excellent record in office, giving satisfaction to the bank officials and the general 
public. He was also secretary and treasurer of the Douglas County Bankers 
Association. 

In 1926 Mr. Warnes was united in marriage to Lottie M. Branan, of Tus- 
cola, Illinois, and they are the parents of a son, Byron E. Mrs. Warnes is a 
member of the Tuscola Women's Club, has served as democratic precinct com- 
mitteeman and has been very active in the democratic women's organization. 
Mr. and Mrs. Warnes hold membership in the Methodist Church and are in- 
terested in all that pertains to the political, intellectual, social and moral 
well-being of the community. While in Tuscola, Mr. Warnes served from 1931 
until 1933 as city treasurer and he was also an active and helpful member of the 
Chamber of Commerce there and was treasurer of the Douglas County Tubercu- 
losis Association. He belongs to the Lincoln Khvanis Club and cooperates 
in all of its plans and projects for the public good. From 1928 until 1933 be 
was very active in the democratic party in Douglas county and since attaining 
his majority he has never failed to give his support to the party at the polls. 



RAY E. REISCHL 

One of the outstanding younger democrats of Illinois is Ray E. Reischl, 
whose home is in East St. Louis, but who is now assistant superintendent of the 
Supervision of Paroles department of the state government in Springfield. He 
is a native of East St. Louis, born November 10, 1902, and is a son of Robert and 
Mame (Broderick) Reischl, the former of whom was born in Kentucky and the 
latter in East St. Louis. 

Ray E. Reischl received his education in the public schools of his home city 
and in St. Louis University, after which he was associated with his father in a 
business, conducted under the name of the State Produce Company of East St. 
Louis. Later he established the Premier Cleaning and Dyeing Company, which 
he conducting that business with much success until March 27, 1933, when he was 
appointed to his present position in the Supervision of Paroles department of 
the state. Mr. Reischl has been a leader in democratic politics of St. Clair 
county, and is at this writing secretary of the county committee. He is serving 
his third term as committeeman of the forty-sixth precinct. Mr. Reischl well 
typifies the progressive, energetic spirit of the younger generation of democrats 
in Illinois, and is thoroughly interested in promoting the welfare of his party in 
every possible way. 

Mr. Reischl was married on the 10th of November, 1932 to Miss Margarette 
Kehol. His fraternal connection is with the Knights of Columbus. 



S. JAY THOMAS 



S. Jay Thomas, one of the well known representatives of democracy in 
Ogle county, is serving as investigator of the retailers' occupational tax. I It- 
was born September 27, 1893, on the farm where he now lives three miles west 
of Oregon, being a son of Robert Lee and Mary (McGuffin) Thomas. The 
father was also born on the old family homestead which his son Jay now occu- 
pies, his natal day being August 3, 1865. He remained a well known agricul- 
turist of the county until his death, which occurred November 8, 1927. His 
widow, who was born in Rockvale township. Ogle county, Illinois, yet occupies 
the old home farm. Mr. Thomas was a democrat, active in local party work, 
but was never ambitious to hold office. 

S. Jay Thomas attended the public schools of Rockvale township and later 
was graduated from the high school of Oregon as a member of the class of 
1913. He subsequently attended the University of Illinois for a year and was 
then on the farm with Irs father until the latter passed away. Since that 



188 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

time he has managed the farm with his mother and displays sound business 
judgmeul in carrying on the work. He lias carefully cultivated his fields and is 
most progressive in all thai he undertakes. 

Mr. Thomas lias served as a clerk of the election board of Rockvale town- 
ship since 1915 and in 1932 was elected precinct committeeman, to which 
office he was reelected in 1934. Since 1932 he has been secretary and treasurer 
of the Ogle county central committee. In 15)24 he was the democratic nominee 
for the office of circuit clerk of Ogle county, and the vote lie received stood as 
a record for a democratic candidate until 1932. On the 5th of September, 1933, 
he was appointed investigator of the retailers' occupational tax, his territory 
including Ogle and De Kalb counties. lie attended the state democratic con- 
vention in Chicago in 1924 and since attaining his majority has been an active 
and loyal party supporter. Fraternally he is a .Mason, belonging to both blue 
lodge and chapter, and he is now master of the local Grange. His interest 
in community affairs is manifest in many tangible ways and his aid and in- 
fluence are always given on the side of progress and development. 

JAMES FREMONT BATES 

Among the capable and faithful men who constitute the highway police 
force of Illinois is numbered James Fremont Bates, of Kewanee. He was born 
in this city in 1907, a son of Fremont and Clara (l>ing) Bates, who are still 
residents of Kewanee. The father has devoted his attention to farming and to 
the coal business throughout his active life, and he is a well known supporter 
of the democratic party in his community. On that ticket he has been elected 
to the office of township supervisor and he has also served on democratic 
committees whereby he has largely furthered the interests and promoted the 
successes of democracy. 

Mastering the work of consecutive grades in the public schools, James F. 
Bates eventually became a high school graduate in Kewanee and then entered 
the University of Illinois, where he won the Bachelor of Science degree at his 
graduation with the class of 1929. For a year thereafter he was a teacher and 
coach in Mansfield, Ohio, and for two years was connected with the Catholic 
high school of Kewanee in the same capacity. His coaching has been largely 
along the lines of basketball and football. For three years he was a director of 
the Kewanee City League, which was the first non-commercial night playing 
baseball league in America. On the 24th of March, 1933, he was appointed a 
member of the highway maintenance police force and is now serving in that 
capacity. He is also vice chairman of the Young Democratic Club of Henry 
county. 

In September, 1932, Mr. Bates was united in marriage to Miss Ruth Nelson, 
of Kewanee. and they are the parents of one child, Beverly. Mr. Bates belongs 
to the Theta Xu Epsilon. a college fraternity, and in fraternal circles has con- 
nection with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is likewise a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church and his life has been guided and directed 
by honorable principles and worthy motives, so that the sterling worth of his 
character is recognized by all with whom he has been associated. 



ARTHUR R. ROY 



Arthur R. Roy, who is now serving for the fourth term as assistant states 
attorney for Adams county, has been an active representative of the legal 
profession in Quincy throughout a period of forty years. He was born in 
Clayton, Adams county. Illinois. December 1. 1871, his parents being John S. 
and Agnes (Leggett) Roy. the former born in Scotland. January 1, 1825, and 
the latter in Ireland. July 13, 1N32. John S. Roy, a farmer by occupation, crossed 
the Atlantic to the United States about 1K43. resided in New Jersey for a 
number of years and was married in New York city in 1849. In 1853 he 
removed with his wife to Clayton, Illinois, where he lived until 1893. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 189 

Arthur R. Roy acquired his early education in the public schools of Adams 
county, Illinois, and subsequently attended the Central Normal College at 
Danville, Indiana. Thereafter he taught in the rural schools of his native 
county for four years, on the expiration of which period he entered upon 
preparation for the legal profession as a student at the Chaddock School of 
Law in Quincy, Illinois. Admitted to the bar in 1894, he has maintained a 
law office in Quincy throughout the intervening period of four decades and 
has been accorded an enviable and remunerative clientele. He is a director of 
the Clayton State Bank of Clayton, Illinois, which he also represents as attorney. 
During the four-year period between 1897 and 1901 he tilled the office of city 
attorney of Quincy. lie served as assistant states attorney from 190.S until 
1912 and tor four years thereafter was connected with the office of Attorney 
General P. J. Lucey in Springfield. In 1917 he again assumed the duties of 
assistant states attorney, thus serving until 1920, and he has tided the same 
office continuously since 1928. He has been a delegate to seven or eight state 
conventions of the democratic party and was also a delegate from his district 
to the democratic national convention at Baltimore in 1912, when Woodrow 
Wilson received the presidential nomination. From 1918 until 1924 he served 
as chairman of the Adams county democratic central committee. 

On the 2d of October, 1904, Mr. Roy married Mrs. Mary J. Barry, mother 
of Daniel H. Barry, who is mentioned on another page of this work. Mr. Roy 
is a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church and fraternally is identified 
with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, while along strictly pro- 
fessional lines he is a member of the Adams County and Illinois State Bar 
Associations. 



MISS AILEEN McGRATH 

Miss Aileen McGrath, daughter of John T. McGrath, whose life story pre- 
cedes this article, has followed in her father's footsteps in several particulars. 
She is a graduate of the Polo high school and also of St. Clara College at Sin- 
sinawa, Wisconsin. Since her father's death she has had the active manage- 
ment of the business which he established and carried on so successfully tor 
many years. Her official title is that of secretary and treasurer of the McGrath- 
Hersch Lumber Company of Polo and in control of its interests she displays 
sound judgment and excellent business ability. During the war Miss McGrath 
was connected with the national war risk insurance department in Wash- 
ington under civil service. 

Miss McGrath has always adhered to the political faith of the democratic 
party and was appointed district committeewoman of the thirteenth con- 
gressional district in 1932. In the same year she attended the national con- 
vention of the party in Chicago as a visitor and she has also attended the last 
two democratic state conventions in Springfield, being a delegate in 1934. 
She was appointed by Governor Horner a member of the Illinois hostess com- 
mittee to serve at the Illinois building of the World's Fair. She is very widely 
known in Polo, where she occupies an enviable position in social as well as 
in political ami business circles. 



CHARLES II. RAMSEY 

Chaides H. Ramsey, road foreman residing at Greenview, was born October 
25, 1880, in Mason City, Illinois, a son of Bloomfield and Laura (Suttley) 
Ramsey, of Mason county. At one time they left Illinois to become residents 
of Iowa but afterward returned to Mason county. The father was manager of 
a grain elevator during the greater part of his life and in politics he was a 
democrat of the old school. He died in 1905, while his widow still survives. 

The schools of Mason City and of Greenview accorded Charles II. Ramsey 
the educational opportunities whereby he prepared for the practical <lnt : es of 



190 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

life. Ai different periods he has engaged in teaming, in conducting a rest- 
aurant, in running a pool hall and in other lines of business. After a time he 
became associated with the Kates & Rogers Construction Company, hard-road 
builders of Chicago, and was advanced to the position of foreman in charge 
of concrete mixing. Among; the roads which he lias aided in constructing is 
the one through (Jreenview. Later he worked as a bridge builder and then 
for eight years followed trucking, making his home during this period in 
Greenview. In January, 1933, he became maintenance foreman for the state of 
Illinois, having charge of roads, bridges and similar work, tlis previous experi- 
ence well (|ualifies him for the position, as he is thoroughly familiar with every 
phase of both road and bridge construction. 

In 1902 Mr. Ramsey married Miss Elsie (laddie, of Greenview, and they 
have a son, Karl, who is a barber of Greenview. Mr. Ramsey belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen of Aineriea. He has always been an active democrat and 
he has served as judge of elections, as a member of the town board and in 
other local offices, to the duties and responsibilities of which he has always 
been loval. 



W. LESTER HOLLISTER, I). V. S. 

Dr. W. Lester llollister, a veterinary surgeon practicing at Avon, was 
born March 7, 1879, in the town where he still resides, his parents being 
Lawrence and Mary (Anderson) llollister, both of whom have passed away. 
The mother's death occurred in 1888, but the father survived until 1920. Law- 
rence llollister was a farmer by occupation, and in early manhood he gave 
his political support to the republican party but later in life became a democrat. 

W. Lester Hollister was educated in Avon public schools and was gradu- 
ated from high school with the class of 1898. Later he spent two or three years 
in Oklahoma, after which he returned to the place of his nativity, where he 
engaged in the grocery business in partnership with A. W. Ray. It was after 
Ihis that he entered the Chicago Veterinary College, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1910. For two years he practiced in Aurora, Illinois, as assistant to 
Dr. Weese and then returned to Avon, where he has since remained. His 
knowledge of the veterinary science and the thoroughness of his work has 
brought to him an extensive practice. 

In 1914 Dr. Hollister was married to Miss Lucretia Merrill, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Merrill of Avon. He is a member of the Federated Church 
at Avon and he has taken the various degrees of Masonry, belonging to Harmony 
Lodge No. 253, A. F. & A. M., of Avon ; Peoria Consistory, in which he has 
attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rites and now belongs also 
to Mohammed Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Peoria. During the second Wilson 
campaign the Doctor became an active democrat and took helpful part in 
organizing a democratic club which made his office its headquarters. He is 
now a county committeeman, being elected in 1934. Since his incumbency as 
committeeman, by effective organization he has cut down the tremendous re- 
publican majority. For two terms he filled the office of township assessor. 
Dr. llollister served two terms as president of the Avon village board and was 
defeated for his third term by advocating city water works. 

He enlisted for service in the Spanish-American war at Abingdon, Illinois, 
and went to Porto Rico with Company I), Sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
under General Miles. He again offered his services to his country in the World 
war and served as a second lieutenant in the Veterinary Corps. He is a member 
Ed Ohatterton Post, No. 578. American Legion, at Avon, and the Spanish War 
Veterans. At the present writing he is inspector in charge of the Peoria Union 
Stock Yards. His know ledge and his experience as a veterinarian well qualify 
him for this position, as be is able to readily recognize the real condition of the 
animals in the yards — conditions that would not be noticeable to the ordinary 
observer. 




W. LESTEE HOLLISTER 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 19:5 

H. C. TAYLOR 

The efficiency and thoroughness of the Cook county highway department 
may well be ascribed to the ability and training embodied in its personnel, a 
member of which is II. C. Taylor, who is in charge of bridges, a most important 
division of this department. Mr. Taylor has had long experience in the con- 
struction of bridges and his association with the highway department, as may be 
noted later, covers a long span of years, during which period his work has been 
consistently satisfactory to all concerned. 

Mr. Taylor was born in Montfort, Grant county, Wisconsin, June 25, 1886, 
and is a son of S. Harvey and Mary E. (Lincoln) Taylor. The Taylor family 
is of English descent, and S. Harvey Taylor is an attorney by profession. Both 
of the parents now reside in Wisconsin. 

II. ('. Taylor attended the grade and high schools of Lancaster, Wisconsin, 
and then took up his scientific studies at the University of Wisconsin, which 
conferred upon him the Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering in 1911. 
hi 1912 he received the degree of Civil Engineer from the same institution. 
This was the realization of a desire to be an engineer which had been created 
in his mind when he was a high school student and he bent every effort to ac- 
quire the necessary training. This accomplished, he accepted employment in 
Chicago with a firm of Consulting Engineers as a designing engineer, in build- 
nig engineering, and remained with them for two and a half years from 1913. 
Following this, for two months, he was paving inspector for the city of Chicago, 
then became inspector engineer with the highway department for two months, 
and after that engineering draftsman for the bridge division of the city of 
Chicago then returned to the highway department of Cook county and was suc- 
cessively appointed assistant civil engineer and as bridge engineer, his service 
with the Cook county highway department now having covered more than a 
twelve-year period. A survey of the beautiful and modern bridge structures 
in Cook county will indicate the creations he has achieved out of steel and con- 
crete, for they rival similar structures in any part of the world. He has kept 
abreast of the times in his study of bridge construction and has embodied every 
modern feature of practical character in his construction work. 

Mr. Taylor is an adherent of the democratic party and has always lent his 
influence wherever possible for the success of the party ticket. Mr. Taylor is 
unmarried. Golfing and fishing are fields of diversion which he seeks whenever 
opportunity offers. He is devoted to his engineering work and this enthusiasm 
and inspiration have been big factors in his success. 



RUDOLPH W. KROPP 



Rudolph W. Kropp, an active democrat since old enough to vote served as 
precinct committeeman at Coal Valley when there were less than twelve votes 
in the precinct, while today it is one of the strongest rural precincts in Rock Island 
county giving support to the democratic party. In November, 1934, he was 
elected county sheriff. Mr. Kropp was born in Coal Valley, Illinois, December 
6, 1894, a son of Gustav T. and Minnie (Welding) Kropp. The father, who has 
now departed this life, was a coal miner during the winter months and in the 
summer seasons worked as a carpenter and mason. Keenly interested in 
politics, he was always an active democrat, and he served for a number of years 
as road commissioner. He belonged to the United Mine Workers of America. 
His widow survives and is yet living in Coal Valley. The family are members 
of the Evangelical Church. 

When in his second year in high school Rudolph W. Kropp put aside his 
textbooks in order to provide for his own support, yet he did additional edu- 
cational work through a correspondence course. In young manhood he became 
a coal miner and followed that work for about twelve years. From the 29th of 
March, 1918, until March 10, 1919. he served in the World war. He was originally 



194 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

in the Coasl Artillery bul overseas was transferred to the Fifty-fourth Ammu- 
nition 'J' rain, with which he did active duty at the trout. He was discharged as 
corporal and is now a member of Moline Lost, No. 246, id' the American Legion 
in which he is very active. 

Alter his return from the battlefields of Europe, Mr. Kropp worked in the 
factories of Moline and East .Moline for a time. For four years he served as 
deputj sheriff of Rock Island county under Howard Gregg and for two years 
was employed in the state treasurer's office under Edward J. Barrett. He was 
made inspector for the Illinois department of conservation and in 19:54 became 
the democratic nominee for the office of county sheriff of Rock Island county, 
to which position he was elected in November, by a majority of forty-eight 
hundred. He is the third democratic candidate for sheriff to be elected from his 
native town of Coal Valley in the last sixteen years. He has been an earnest 
worker in democratic ranks since old enough to vote and he served as precinct 
committeeman for twelve years, filling the office first when there were not twelve 
votes in the precinct. His labors have contributed to the growth and develop- 
ment of the party and he has lived to see his precinct become one of the strongest 
in Lock Island county outside of the cities. 

For ten years Mr. Kropp was an officer of the United Mine Workers of 
America. He has always been fond id' outdoor life and athletics and is a member 
of the Western Illinois Sportsmen's Association. He played on one of the fastest 
semi-professional baseball teams in the country, taking part in the final tourna- 
ment championship game. He has also manifested a keen interest in basketball 
and other athletic sports, lie belongs to the Masonic fraternity, the p]agles at 
Moline, the Moline Turners, the American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign 
Wars, and these different organizations regard him as one of their sterling 
representative members. 



EDWARD A. ROGALA 

Edward A. Rogala, living at 36 Fourteenth street, North Chicago, is a 
member of the state police, to which position he was appointed February 18, 
1933. He was born October 2, 1909, in the city where he yet makes his home, 
his parents being Albert and Anna Rogala, both of whom have now passed 
away. The family were faithful adherents of the ( 'atholic ( Ihurch and two of the 
daughters joined a Catholic order as nuns. A brother of Edward A. Rogala 
is Alexander Rogala. who is now serving as a clerk in the post office of North 
( 'hicago. 

In the schools of his natve city Edward A. Rogala pursued his education 
and when he had completed his studies he became a clerk in a grocery store, 
being thus employed until he was made a member of the state police force on 
the 18th of February, 1933. He has always voted the democratic ticket since 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise and he has been an earnest pai'ty 
worker, rendering valuable assistance to the committeeman. He is a member 
of the Polish Roosevelt Democratic Club of North Chicago and of the Young 
Men's Democratic Club. 

On the 14th of October, 1933, Mr. Rogala was united in marriage to Miss 
Stella Krupa. He belongs to the Polish National Alliance and is a communi- 
cant of the Holy Rosary Catholic Church, being a member of a very active 
( 'atholic family. 

FRANK J. GOLLINGS 

Frank J. Codings, who has been actively engaged in the practice of law 
in Decatur since 1931, is making steady professional progress as he demonstrates 
his ability to handle intricate and involved legal problems before the courts. 
Decatur numbers him among her native sons, his birth having here occurred 
August 24. l!K)7. his | aren's I e ; ng YYalC r B. and Marie A. ( Moorey I GollingS. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 195 

His father was born in Peterborough, England, and came to the United States in 
1900, at which time he settled in Macon county, Illinois, having since made his 
home in Decatur. For many years he was national chairman of the railroad 
clerks, being very prominent in railway circles. He is now superintendent of 
the Wabash Railroad hospitals. He married Marie A. Mooney, a native of 
Niantic, Macon county, Illinois, and a daughter of Peter Mooney, who was 
born in Ireland and on coming to the new world established his home in 
Niantic, where he married Catherine Nelligan, a native of Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. Peter Mooney followed farming throughout his entire life and was 
a very stanch democrat, giving active suport to the party. 

Frank J. Gollings pursued his early education in the parochial schools of 
Decatur and later attended the high school of this city, while in preparation 
for a professional career he entered the University of Illinois which institution 
conferred upon him the Bachelor of Science degree in 1929 and that of 
Bachelor of Laws in 1931. On the 13th of October, 1931, he was admitted to 
the Illinois bar and opened an office in Decatur, where he has since continued in 
practice, his clientage constantly increasing as the years go by. 

Mr. Gollings has been very active in democratic politics since attaining 
his majority and in 1932 he became one of the organizers of the Macon 
County Jefferson Club, in which he still holds membership. In the same year 
he was a delegate to the state, congressional and judicial conventions and he 
stumped Macon and neighboring counties in support of the entire ticket, de- 
livering many campaign addresses that held the attention of his auditors and 
won strength for the party. In 1932 he was appointed assistant state's attorney 
of Macon county and is now occupying the office, and on the 1st of June, 1934, 
he was appointed by the United States district court for the southern district 
of Illinois as federal conciliation commissioner for Macon county, Illinois. He 
is also code attorney for the local Automobile Dealers Association. 

Mr. Gollings is identified with many fraternities and societies. He belongs 
to the Phi Kappa, a social organization, and to the Phi Delta Phi, a legal fra- 
ternity. He is now secretary-treasurer of the Decatur and Macon county Illinois 
Club and he belongs to the Junior Chamber of Commerce of Decatur, while along 
strictly professional lines he is connected with the Macon County, the Illinois 
State and American Bar Associations. His social nature finds expression in 
his membership in the Decatur County Club and he is a well known and popular 
resident of his native city, where his activities are bringing him constantly 
before the public. 



JOHN T. McGRATH 



John T. McGrath, who departed this life January 11, 1930, was for many 
years a leading business man and representative citizen of Polo. He spent 
his entire life in Ogle county, his birth having occurred in Woosung, July 21, 
1857, his parents being Philip J. and Catherine (Reily) McGrath. At the 
usual age he entered the public schools of his native town and mastered the 
work of successive grades. He afterward took up the profession of teaching, 
which he followed in the rural schools near Dixon for a few years in his early 
manhood. In 1882 he turned his attention to commercial pursuits, establish- 
ing a mercantile business in Woosung. A few years later he removed to Polo, 
where he opened a retail lumber and coal yard, conducting this business until 
his death. He built up a substantial trade and was a thoroughly reliable as 
well as progressive dealer. 

On the 11th of November, 1890, Mr. McGrath was united in marriage t<> 
Ansiebel Ourran, of Dixon, Illinois, and they became the parents of three 
daughters, Catherine, Aileen M. and Annabel John. The first named is the wife 
of Dr. Charles S. Phalen, of Sparta, Wisconsin, and has two children, John 
McGrath and Charles S., Jr. 



196 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Mr. McGrath was a leading and helpful member of St. Mary's Catholic 
Church of Polo. In politics he was active as a democratic supporter, working 
earnestly and effectively for the party in Ogle county throughout his life. For 
many years he was precind committeeman and he exerted a wide influence 
in party affairs. He frequently attended the democratic state conventions as 
a delegate and he was a visitor to several of the national conventions of his 
party. An ardent admirer and follower of William Jennings Bryan, he stood 
for the highesl ideals of the party. During the World war he served as a mem- 
ber of the County Council of Defense and also as a member of the fuel conser- 
vation committee. In February, 1901, he was elected president of the Illinois 
Lumber Dealers Association and filled the office for one term. 



EDWIN W. DAILY 



Edwin W. Daily, who has been actively interested in democratic politics 
for a number of years and who is now the newly elected treasurer of Fulton 
county, was born near Canton, Fulton county, Illinois, October 2, 1908, his 
parents being J. P. and Mary (Thompson) Daily. The mother has passed away, 
but the father still resides near Canton. He has been a coal mine operator and 
a merchant but is now living- retired, enjoying a well earned rest. In politics he 
has always been an active democrat. 

Edwin W. Daily began his education in the schools of Canton, there pur- 
suing his studies until he reached the seventh grade, when he was sent to St. 
Bede College at Peru, Illinois, from which institution he was graduated in 
due time. He then became associated with his father in mining operations and 
later he was with the International Harvester Company at Canton. In this 
community he is well known and enjoys the friendship of the majority of 
those with whom he has come in contact. He and his family are members of 
the Catholic Church. Since attaining his majority he has consistently voted 
with the democratic party and has sought to further its successes in all legiti- 
mate ways. He has served as precinct committeeman and also on the Canton 
executive committee, and the recognition of his fidelity to the party has come 
to him in the support which he received at the primaries in the spring of 
19:54, when he was made the candidate for the office of county treasurer, to 
which position he was elected November 6, 1934, by a majority of two thousand 
in this normally republican county. 



JOHN EDWARD JOHNSON 

John Edwai'd Johnson, proprietor of a tavern and cafe at De Kail) known 
as Johnson's Inn, was born in the province of Skane, Sweden, May 30, 1873, 
a son of Goran and Johanna Johnson. He pursued his education in the graded 
schools of his native country and was a youth of fifteen years when in 1888 
he accompanied his parents on their emigration to the United States, the 
family home being established in De Kalb county, Illinois. Since 1897 he has 
been proprietor of a tavern and cafe in De Kalb and is accorded a liberal 
patronage. 

On the 16th of August, 1901, in Chicago, Mr. Johnson was united in 
marriage to Anna Holm, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Holm, natives of 
Sweden. Mrs. Johnson is one of the active members of the Scandinavian 
Democratic Club of De Kalb county. Mi'. Johnson has always been an enthus- 
iastic supporter of the democratic party and was a candidate for sheriff of 
De Kalb county in 1930. He is uoav committeeman of Precinct No. 2 of De Kalb, 
having served since 1931, and he is judge of election in Ward 2. He has 
served on the board of supervisors, belongs to the Young Peoples Democratic 
Club of De Kalb and attends all of the county conventions, while in 1982 he 
attended the national convention in Chicago. The party finds him an active 
and energetic worker and one whose efforts are an effective force in winning 
party successes. Mr. Johnson belongs to the Lutheran Church and is well 




EDWIN W. DAILY 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 199 

known in fraternal circles, being a charter member of Aerie No. 1316 of 1 1n- 
Fraternal Order of Eagles in L)e Kalb. He is likewise affiliated with Lodge 
No. 586 of the Loyal Order of Moose in De Kalb and with the Vikings. 



THOMAS II. FOSTER 



Thomas II. Foster, a wide-awake and progressive young man of Richmond, 
McHenry county, was appointed highway maintenance patrolman February 15, 
1933, and has since served. He was born December 31, 1910, in the village where 
he still lives, and is a representative of one of the old families of northeastern 
Illinois. His grandparents in the paternal line were Thomas II. and Sarah 
(Sparrow) Foster. The former was born in Worcestershire, England, and when 
a youth of seventeen years crossed the broad Atlantic to the new world. Making 
his way into the interior of the country, he settled at Elgin, Illinois, whei*e he 
became an active and prominent business man, owning and operating a flour 
mill in that city for about twenty-three years. He was always a stalwart sup- 
porter of democratic principles and under Governor Altgeld was appointed head 
weighmaster of the Chicago Board of Trade, acting in that capacity from the 
time of his appointment until his death. He also served for several terms as 
alderman and did much to further the municipal welfare of his city. He 
attended various democratic state and national conventions and was an out 
standing party leader in liis county, exerting a widely felt influence over public 
thought and action. His son, Dr. W. E. Foster, was born in Elgin, Kane county, 
and in young manhood prepared for the medical profession. Opening an office 
in Richmond, he here engaged in active practice for twenty-nine years and was 
regarded as one of the leading physicians of McHenry comity. He followed in 
the political footsteps of his father and was always a standi democrat, giving 
active aid to the party and its candidates. He died June 1, 1931, and is still 
survived by his widow, who bore the maiden name of Clara E. Marckhoff and who 
yet makes her home in Richmond. 

Their son, Thomas II. Foster, had the benefit of educational training in 
the public schools of his native village and afterward attended the Elgin Academy 
at Elgin, Illinois, from which he was graduated on the completion of his course. 
He next studied in the Dunwoody Institute at Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he 
was graduated with the class of 1929. After completing his college work he con- 
ducted a gas station at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, for two years and on the 15th 
of February, 1933, he was appointed highway maintenance patrolman, in which 
connection he has made an excellent record. He is a young man of only twenty- 
four years but has already established himself as one of the representative 
citizens of Richmond, where he makes his home with his mother. Since attaining 
his majority he lias been active in politics, giving stanch allegiance to the 
democratic [tarty. 



U. S. LEWIS, M. D. 



Dr. U. S. Lewis, a successful practicing physician of East Dubuque, is now 
serving as district health superintendent and is also the chairman of the Jo 
Daviess county democratic organization. A native of AVisconsin, he was born at 
Patch Grove, Grant county, August 26, 1866, his parents being William and 
Catherine (Ryan) Lewis. The father was born at Delhi, Delaware county. New 
York, in 1831 and the mother's birth occurred in Albany, New York, in 1835. 
She was still an infant when taken by her parents to Wisconsin, the family home 
being established in Cassville. On removing westward to the Badger state 
William Lewis settled in Grant county, taking up his abode there prior to the 
Civil war. He was one of a family of eight brothers and one sister. He followed 
the occupation of farming as a life work and in the early part of his life was a 
republican but never voted that ticket after Rutherford B. Hayes was its presi- 
dential candidate. 

C S. Lewis attended the public schools of Grant county, Wisconsin, and 



200 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

was graduated from the high school of Cassville. He determined to make the 
practice of medicine his life work and with that end in view matriculated in 
Kusli Medical College <>t' Chicago, where he completed the full course as a member 
of the class of 1896. He then opened an office in Cassville hut the following year 
removed to East Dubuque, where he lias remained in active practice continuously 
since, covering a period of thirty-seven years. He has always kept in touch with 
the progress made by medical science and he has long been accorded a large and 
important practice. 

On the 1st of August, 1894, Dr. Lewis married Celia Kuchenberg, who 
passed away May 23, 1914, leaving tour children: Gertrude O, the wife of E. F. 
Olsen, of Adrian, Michigan; Lela, who is the wife of M. II. Cooper, of Ottawa, 
Illinois; U. S., Jr., a resident of East Dubuque, this state; and William W., also 
living in East Dubuque. On the 25th of December, 1914, Dr. Lewis was again 
married, his second union being with Delia C. Thill, who departed this life 
February 11, 1933. 

Dr. Lew T is has been very active in democratic affairs since old enough to 
vote, his first presidential ballot being cast for Grover Cleveland. A recognition 
of his public spirit and devotion to the general good led to his election as mayor 
of East Dubuque and for about ten years he continued to fill that office, his 
administration receiving strong endorsement because of what he accomplished 
for the city. He has been precinct committeeman for the past twelve years or 
more and in 1932 was elected chairman of the county democratic central com- 
mittee, in which position he is now serving, having been reelected precinct com- 
mitteeman and as chairman in 1934. Doctor was a candidate for the legislature 
in 1932 but was unsuccessful in the primary. He has attended several of the 
state conventions, was a delegate to the democratic national convention in San 
Francisco in 1920 and a visitor to the National Convention in Chicago in 1932. 
In August, 1933, he was appointed district health superintendent, his dis- 
trict including Whiteside, Carroll and Jo Daviess counties. He is well 
qualified for the position by reason of his long and valuable experience as a 
physician and surgeon and he is rendering an excellent account of himself in 
the discharge of the duties that devolve upon him in this relation. 



RAYMOND J. MURPHY 

Raymond J. Murphy, an active young democrat who is now serving as 
secretary to the commissioner of public works of Peoria and who exerts a 
widely felt influence among the younger generation in connection with political 
interests, was born November 30, 1900, in the city which is still his home, his 
parents being Joseph and Augusta (Mausser) Murphy. The father, also a 
native of Peoria, was a son of John and Catherine Murphy, the former a native 
of Ireland, whence he came to the new world, easting in his lot among the pioneer 
residents of this city. He was an engineer by occupation. His wife was a 
daughter of Chris and Catherine (Kessler) Mausser, who were of German 
descent, and the Kessler family were also among the first residents of Peoria. 
Joseph Murphy became a well known printer and served on the staff of the 
Peoria Journal for many years. Thus along both paternal and maternal lines 
Raymond J. Murphy is a representative of old and well known families of 
central Illinois. 

He was the only child born to his parents and in his youthful days he 
attended the Spalding Institute of Peoria and the Armour Institute of Tech- 
nology in Chicago, where he pursued a course in engineering. Subsequently 
he became associated with the firm of Jobst & Sons, a construction company 
of Peoria, and at one time he was located in New York city, being connected 
with the business office of the New York Journal. In 1933 he was appointed 
secretary to the commissioner of public works of Peoria and is now filling 
this position, the duties of which he is discharging with promptness and capa- 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 201 

bility. He lias been active in democratic politics as a committeeman and is 
one of the stalwart supporters of the party here. 

Mr. Murphy was united in marriage to Miss Hazel Marie Smilie, who was 
born in Benson, Illinois, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herschel Smilie. They have 
a wide acquaintance in Peoria and enjoy the warm friendship of many with 
whom they have been brought in contact. 

LESLIE EARL SEARS 

Leslie Earl Sears, well known in business circles as secretary of the 
Warrensburg Canning Company of Warrensburg. Macon county, was born 
at Three Rivers, Michigan, July 2, 1888. His parents are Louis Alonzo and 
Inis E. Taber Sears, the former a native of Lawrence, Kansas, and the latter 
of Ohio. They became residents of Illinois in 1930. Louis A. Sears, the father 
of our subject, engaged in farming until- twenty-one years of age and then 
went to Ohio, where he worked for his uncle in a canning factory at Cirele- 
ville. A year later he removed to Three Rivers, Michigan, where he built a 
canning plant which he operated until 1893. In that year he removed to 
Chillicothe, Ohio, where he became associated with a canning business, eon- 
ducting it until 1914. Then again he went to Michigan, settling in Grand 
Rapids, where he carried on a canning business, and while there bought the 
present plant at Warrensburg, Illinois. This was in 1915 and he has since 
engaged in canning sweet corn under the name of the Warrensburg Canning 
( 'ompany, of which he is president. He is thoroughly familiar with every phase 
of the canning business and has carefully and successfully conducted Ids affairs. 
In politics he is a stanch democrat and in Ohio, in 1908, was a candidate for 
congress. He has always supported the entire ticket and has labored effectively 
for party success. 

Leslie Earl Sears was educated in the public schools of Chillicothe. Ohio. 
there attending high school, and later spent two years as a student in the 
Ohio State University. Starting out in the business world, he was associated 
with his father for two years and then went to California in 1910, there en- 
gaging in the canning business until 1922. In that year he arrived in War- 
rensburg, Illinois, to become secreteary of the Warrensburg Canning Company 
and since that time has been active in the management and control of the 
business. 

Like his father, he has also been an earnest democrat and in 1934 was 
elected committeeman for a two years' term. He attends the various local 
meetings of the party and is unfaltering in his allegiance to the principles 
which underlie the democratic organization. 



WALTER SLOOP 



Walter Sloop, an outstanding figure in connection with educational interest- 
in this state, was appointed an instructor in the Illinois School for the Blind at 
Jacksonville in August, 1933. He was born in Ohio, October 2, 1896, and is a 
son of Samuel and Mary (Higgins) Sloop, who arrived in Illinois in 1900, settling 
on a farm in Clark county. The father continued the cultivation and further 
development of his fields up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1910. He 
always voted the straight democratic ticket and was stanch in his support of the 
principles of the party. 

The Clark county public schools accorded Walter Sloop his early educational 
opportunities, for he was but four years of ajre when the family home was estab- 
lished here. In early manhood he studied music and later he taught music until 
August, 1933, at which time he was appointed instructor in the Illinois School 
for the Blind at Jacksonville. His work in this field has been highly satisfactory 
and has proven a blessing to the unfortunate inmates of the institution. 

On the 10th of April, 1929, Mr. Sloop was united in marriage to .Miss Stella 
Burns, a native of Ohio, who followed the profession of teaching prior to her 



202 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

marriage and who is also an active worker in the local ranks of the democratic 
party. Mr. Sloop's activity in democratic circles began when he reached the 
age of twenty-one. He worked with the committeemen of Ids precinct, largely 
assisted in getting out the vote and has attended all of the local and congressional 
conventions. He is a member of the Jeffersonian Club and he takes keen interest 
in the growth of the party, for he believes firmly in the principles of democracy 
and he recognizes the duties and obligations as well as the priveleges of citizenship. 



MRS. BLANCHE B. HOOD 

Mrs. Blanche B. Hood, acceptably filling the position of postmaster at 
Mound City, has spent practically her entire life here and is well known through- 
out Pulaski county. Her father, Thomas Boyd, was born in Perry county, Illi- 
nois, in 1847 and is still living at the advanced age of eighty-seven years and 
goes to his office every day. He became an attorney and has practiced his pro- 
fession successfully for an extended period. At one time he was president, of 
the National Bank of Mound City. In politics he has always been a democrat 
and has served as mayor of Mound City but is no longer active politically. He 
married Sally Hughes, who was born near New Caledonia, Pulaski county, a 
daughter of a pioneer settler who once owned most of the county and still has 
large land holdings. The Hughes family, like the Boyd family, has always given 
its allegiance to the democratic party. 

After mastering the branches of learning taught in the public schools 
Blanche Boyd attended Monticello Seminary at Godfrey, Illinois, and later 
entered the Ward-Belmont Seminary at Nashville, Tennessee, but was called 
back home during her senior year on account of a serious accident which her 
mother had sustained. In her last year at school — 1908 — Miss Boyd went abroad 
with a school group and visited many of the points of interest in Europe, gain- 
ing that broad and liberal culture which only travel can bring. In 1909 she be- 
came the wife of Fred B. Hood, a well known and prominent attorney, who voted 
with the republican party and on that ticket was elected to several offices. He 
was at various times county judge of Pulaski county, serving altogether on the 
bench for eleven years, was also master in chancery and at one time filled the 
position of state's attorney. He died in 1928, leaving his wife and three child- 
ren: Frederick B., now living in Mound City; Mertice, attending high school; 
and Margaret, who is an eighth grade pupil. 

Mrs. Hood is well known in the social and club circles of Mound City, where 
she is now filling the office of president of the Woman's (Tub. She is likewise 
past president of the twenty-fifth district of the Illinois Federation of Women's 
Clubs, is a past matron of the Eastern Star and past high priestess of the White 
Shrine of Jerusalem, also an auxiliary of the Masonic fraternity. She is a mem- 
ber of the Congregational Church and a past president of its Ladies Aid Society. 
Her interest in politics has been evidenced in a practical and helpful way and 
she is now chairman of the Women's Jeffersonian Club. On the 1st of February, 
1934, she was appointed postmaster at Mound City, so that her incumbency in 
the office will continue until 1938. 



HARVEY F. DOERGE 



Harvey F. Doerge, postmaster of Chester, was born at Sainte Genevieve, 
Missouri, December 14, 1899. His parents were Rudolph and Bertha (Mischke) 
Doerge, the latter a native of Ashley, Washington county, Illinois, and a daugh- 
ter of William Mischke, who was a farmer by occupation and a stanch democrat 
in politics. Rudolph Doerge was born at sea while his parents were voyaging 
from Germany to the United States in 1867. He engaged in painting and 
interior decorating throughout his active career and much of his work is 
still extant in southern Illinois. Politically he was a stalwart supporter of 
the democratic party. He met an accidental death in 1918, falling from a 
bridge scaffold. 




BLANCHE B. HOOD 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 205 

Harvey P. Doerge pursued his education as a grammar school pupil of 
Sainte Genevieve, Missouri, and also attended high school for a year. He then 
obtained the position of call boy with the Frisco Railroad, was next made 
tower man at Little Rock, near Sainte Genevieve, later worked as machinist's 
helper in the roundhouse and afterward became fireman. On completing a 
course with the International Correspondence Schools he passed the examin- 
ation for locomotive engineer and was subsequently employed as fireman, 
switchman and engineer with the Frisco, Missouri Pacific and Missouri & 
Illinois railroads until 1925. In that year he came to Chester, Illinois, here 
embarking in the radio and electrical business in association with his father- 
in-law, W. R. Dial. He disposed of his interests in this connection in 1927 and 
identified himself with the Shell Petroleum Corporation, later becoming con- 
nected with the Phillips Petroleum Company, which he represented until 
assuming the duties of his present office. It was in 1933 that he was appointed 
postmaster of Chester, for which position he has proved himself splendidly 
qualified. 

On the 14th of February, 1921, in Chester, Illinois. Mr. Doerge was united 
in marriage to Ruth V. Dial, a daughter of W. R. Dial. Mrs. Doerge. who was 
born in Randolph county. Illinois, taught in the rural schools prior to her 
marriage and is an active supporter of the democratic party, now serving on the 
women's auxiliary of the county committee. Mr. and Mrs. Doerge are the 
parents of two children. Ronald and Patricia Lee. Mr. Doerge belongs to the 
Chester Chamber of Commerce and is a highly esteemed and popular young 
citizen of his community. His favorite forms of recreation are hunting and 
fishing. 

OSCAR H. NELSON 

On the loth of February, 1933, Oscar H. Nelson, living in Cary. was 
appointed to a position with the highway maintenance department and has served 
in that connection continuously since. He has always lived in McIIenry county, 
his birth having occurred at Crystal Lake, Illinois, August 19, 1900, his parents 
being Hans and Edla (Bergestand) Nelson. While spending his youthful days 
under the parental roof he attended the public schools of Crystal Lake and of 
Ridgeheld, and when his school days were over he obtained employment as a 
farm hand, working in that way and at various other jobs until 1922. Durin«' 
the succeeding seven years, until 1929, he was a brakeman on the Chicago & 
North Western Railway, and for almost two years he has been in the employ of 
The state as a representative of the highway maintenance department. He received 
his appointment as a supporter of the democratic party, with which he has voted 
since attaining his majority, and he has taken a very active part in the local 
campaigns since 1928. 

GEORGE F. SEHRING 

George F. Sehring. first assistant warden of the Illinois State Penitentiary 
at Joliet, was born February 21, 1872, in the city where he still lives, his parents 
being Frederick and Louisa Sehring, both of whom were natives of Germany. 
Coming to the United States, they traveled across the country to Mokena, Illinois. 
and thence removed to Joliet. The father was employed in the county recorder's 
office and was a candidate for state senator as the opponent of A. 0. Marshall. 
The election was contested and was thrown out by a minority report. Later 
Mr. Sehring served as alderman of Joliet. He was president of the Fred Sehring 
Brewing Company, which was in fact his main business activity. Both he and 
his wife have now passed away. 

George F. Sehring. after completing his studies in tin- .Joliet high school, 
pursued a commercial course in the Metropolitan Business College of Chicago. 
Returning home, he obtained a position in the Will County National Bank and 
was thus employed for twelve years. He also was identified with the Fred 



206 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Sehring Brewing Company dor eighteen years and was regarded as an active 
ami progressive business man of Ins community. He Likew.se gave considerable 

attention to public office and in 1905 entered upon a two years' term as city 
treasurer of Joliet. In 1923 he was chosen mayor and filled the office Tor eighl 
years or until 1931 under the commission form of government. lie was the 
democratic candidate for the office of state auditor in 1928 and was chairman of 
the democratic county central committee from 1924 until PK$4, previous to which 
tunc he had served for many years as a member of the committee. His political 
activities have always been intelligently and effectively directed and he lias 
exerted a widely felt influence in the party in Will county. At the present 
writing he is serving as the tirsl assistant warden of the Illinois State Penitentiary. 
In 1896 Mr. Sehring married .Miss Louisa Kramer, of Joliet, and to them were 
born live children, as follows: Margaret, who is deceased; Gertrude, the wife 

of Joseph Lennon; Fred W., who is engaged in the candy business; George, a 
practicing physician of -Joliet; and Louise, the wife of John Cassidy. The wife 
and mother passed away in 1925 and three years later, in 1928, Mr. Sehring was 
again married, his second union being with Miss .Josephine Barrett, by whom 
he has a daughter, Sheila, now four years of age. 

Fraternally .Mr. Sehring is identified with the Elks and the Eagles and he 
belongs to the .Mutual Benefit Society, a German organization. Formerly he was 
connected with the Kiwanis Club, the Rotary Club and the Association of Com- 
merce. He has always been interested in civic affairs and has worked persistently 
to further the public good along that line. 



WALTER L. SHERLOCK 

Illinois Democracy may well boast of a most enthusiastic supporter in the 
pel-son of Walter L. Sherlock, of Savanna, Carroll county, who was the organizer 
and now the chairman of the Carroll County Democratic Voters League, and is 
known as one of the state's most astute and successful financiers, now being 
president id' both the Sherlock finance Corporation of Savanna and the Sterling 
Public Finance Corporation in Sterling, Illinois. 

Walter L. Sherlock is a native of Steward, Lei' county, Illinois, born No- 
vember 27, 1895, a son of Henry K. and Jennie (Connor) Sherlock. His paternal 
grandfather was Richard Sherlock, who settled in the county near Steward about 
1860 and was one of the early democrats of this section of the state. Henry K. 
Sherlock was born on a farm at Steward in 1N74, and for many years was in the 
grain and livestock business in Steward. In democratic politics and civic affairs 
he was \fvy prominent. He was a vice president and a director of the First 
National Bank in Steward, was president of the local school board and was city 
alderman for several terms. In the year 1926, he moved to Chicago, where he 
is now enjoying a well-earned life of retirement. His wife. Jennie (Connor) 
Sherlock, was born in Farlville, Illinois, October •'!, 1871. 

Walter L. Sherlock attended grade and high schools in Steward and gradu 
ated from the latter in 1913. lie then took up his advanced studies at St. Bede 
College in Peru. Illinois, and graduated in PH."). After leaving school, he was 
cashier of the Esmond State Lank' in Esmond, Illinois, but in June, 1918, he 
enlisted in the United States Army, serving in the finance department. He went 
overseas in September, J.918 and remained there for eleven months. He returned 
to the I nited States in August, 1919, and in the same month received his honorable 
discharge. He was commissioned second lieutenant and discharged with that 
rank. 

After leaving the army Mr. Sherlock" was in the employ of the Southwest 
Trust and Savings Bank of Chicago. In 1920, he went with the Forest City 
National Bank of Poeld'ord as teller. In 1921 he came to Savanna as cashier 
of the First National Bank, and remained in that capacity until 1928. In that year 
he was one of II -ganizers of the Savanna Securities Company and in !!••">-! he 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 207 

organized the Sherlock Finance Corporation, of which he has been president since. 
As previously noted, he is president of the Sterling Public Finance Corporation 
in Sterling, Illinois. 

In democratic politics of Carroll county, Mr. Sherlock has for several years 
been a leading figure. In 1982 he organized the Carroll County Democratic 
Voters League, and since that date has been chairman of the organization. He 
also attended the democratic state convention in Springfield as a delegate in 1934, 
and in many ways has given material assistance to the party. 

On July 14, 1926, Mr. Sherlock was married to Miss Laura M. Berner, 
daughter of Herman F. Berner of Savanna, and to them has been born a son, 
James Karon. 

Mr. Sherlock belongs to the American Legion, of which he was finance officer 
many years, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and is a past president of the Lions Club of Savanna, fie is still a 
second lieutenant in the United States Army Reserve and is a member of The 
Reserve Officers Association. 



GEORGE E. RAY 



George E. Ray, superintendent of the Illinois State Farm at Vandalia 
through appointment of Governor Horner in 1933 and previously well known 
as a merchant, was born in Marion county, Illinois, April 12, 1887. His father, 
Wiley Ray, was a native of Kentucky, born January 2, 1852, but during his 
boyhood his people removed to Tennessee and subsequently the family home was 
established in .Jefferson county, Illinois, where Wiley Ray was reared to the 
occupation of farming. Later he married and has since carried on agricultural 
pursuits in Salem township, Marion county, where he is still located. He comes 
of a family whose stanch adherence to the democratic party has always been 
widely recognized and he has never failed to support the party ticket, yet he has 
never sought nor desired public office as a reward for party fealty. He married 
Ann Williams, who was born in Illinois in 1862, and they have become the parents 
of seven children, namely: Orvil and Lillian, both of whom are deceased; Haller, 
a farmer of Marion county, Illinois; George E.; Scott, who also follows farming 
in Marion county ; Mary, the wife of Harry Shanafelt, a farmer of Salem township, 
Marion county, this state; and Margaret, the wife of Paul Bryant, of St. Louis, 
Missouri. 

Spending his boyhood and youth under the parental roof, George E. Ray 
attended the public schools of his native county until he began devoting his 
entire time at an early age to the farm work, receiving a thorough and systematic 
training in the various tasks relative to crop production. Ambitious to engage 
in business on his own account, lie rented a farm when nineteen years of age and 
operated it for three years. II is success during that period enabled him then 
to purchase land and he carried on his own farm until 1913, when he became 
fireman on the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad. He was afterward with 
the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy until 1923, when he established a meat and 
grocery store in Centralia, Illinois, conducting the business until 1927. In that 
year he became a meat salesman, covering southern Illinois until 1930, when lie 
established a wholesale meat business, to which he gave personal supervision 
until 1933, when he turned the management over to his two sons in order to accept 
the appointment of superintendent of the Illinois State Farm at Vandalia from 
Governor Henry Horner. 

On the 18th of December, 1907, Mr. Ray was married to Miss Burma Mercer. 
a daughter of Frank and Julia Mercer, who were representatives of a pioneer 
democratic family of Marion county, Illinois. Her father, who was a fanner and 
carpenter contractor, served as tax collector in Salem township. Mr. and Mrs. Ray 
have a family of three children: Merle and Robert, who are managers of their 
father's wholesale meat business and, like him. are stanch democrats; and Burma 



208 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Jane, who is attending school. The parents hold membership in the Baptisl 
Church and Mr. Kay is a member of Marion Lodge, No. 130, A. F. & A. M. Both 

.Mr. and .Mrs. Kay have always I n stalwart advocates <>f the democratic party 

and the latter has been active in party work since \U'2'2. she is now a member of 
the Marion County Women's Democratic Club. .Mr. Kay has worked indefatig- 
ably for party success since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. In 
19lL> he was elected highway commissioner of Salem township and filled the office 
for a year, when he resigned. In 1930 he was elected precinct committeeman and 
afterward was chosen chairman of the Marion county democratic central com- 
mittee, in which office he has been retained. He has been a delegate to many 
congressional, judicial and state conventions and has often attended state con- 
ventions as a visitor. In 1932 he was elected an alternate to the democratic 
national convention in Chicago. During the past four years he has made many 
campaign speeches in support of the entire ticket in all the neighboring counties, 
and his addresses are logical, forceful and convincing. During his incumbency 
as superintendent of the Illinois State Farm he has saved the commonwealth 
forty-two thousand dollars over the expenses of the previous year. In tins he 
has had the cooperation of those serving under him and their united efforts have 
brought about a result that is highly "ratifying to the taxpayers and highly 
commendable in the official. 



JOHN E. DEMPSEY 



John E. Dempsey, of Peoria, democratic candidate for probate clerk in 
1934. was born in Brimfield, Peoria county, June 7, 1869, a son of Thomas and 
Mary (McKee) Dempsey. The father was born in Tipperary, Ireland, and 
became a resident of Peoria county in 1858. He was a farmer by occupation 
and was well known in the vicinity of Brimfield, and throughout Peoria county 
be also had a wide acquaintance. During the Civil war he joined the Union 
Army and was with his regiment at the front. He was among the few who 
came out of the Civil war and maintained his democracy. He was always a 
worker in the ranks of the party. He wedded Mary McKee, who was born in 
Belfast, Ireland, their marriage being celebrated in New York city, and shortly 
afterward they established their home in Peoria county. He died about 1898 
and his wife in 1904. They had a family of eight children, as follows : John E., 
of this review; George; James; Thomas; Edward; Mrs. Margaret Conway; 
and William and Mary, both of whom are deceased. 

John E. Dempsey was educated in Peoria county and started out to pro- 
vide for his own support by working as an employe in a distillery. He was a 
general mechanic and followed that pursuit for more than thirty years, work- 
ing his way steadily upward and holding good positions. 

Mr. Dempsey was active in local politics as a worker for the democratic 
cause in early manhood. His personal acquaintance extended throughout the 
county and he unselfishly devoted himself to the party's welfare without 
any thought of personal gain. However, in 1916 he was nominated for state 
senator and in 1934 he received the democratic nomination for probate clerk. 
Although there was little chance of success in these campaigns, he spent money 
in the general interests of the party and through the lean years he w r as always 
active in keeping the party alive and unified. He likewise served as county 
chairman in 1916. In the primaries of 1934 he was nominated for probate 
clerk and despite the opposition of newer elements in the party he ran ahead 
of his opponent in the county generally and in the city of Peoria. He won the 
nomination with hardly any provision for campaign expenses and in the face 
of opposition from the elements in the party who had sought to keep the old 
political veteran in the rear. To quote his own words, he "showed them 
he was still on deck," and old friends rallied to his support and gave him a 
eoodlv vote. 




JOHN E. DEMPSEY 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 211 

In early manhood Mr. Dempsey was united in marriage to Miss Theresa 
Nickels, a native of Limestone township, Peoria county, Illinois, and a daughter 
of William and Elizabeth (Greischer) Nickels. Mr. and Mrs. Dempsey are 
the parents of five children, as follows: William, Lucille, Helen, Mary and 
Robert. Mr. Dempsey is a member of the Catholic church and is highly es- 
teemed throughout Peoria county by all classes, especially by the working 
people, whose interests he has ever striven to promote. 



ELMER C. FOLLETT 



Elmer C. Follett, a representative of the farming interests of La Salle 
county, giving his attention particularly to the raising of small fruits, makes 
his home on the Bloomington road, not far from Ottawa. He was born in 
Deer Park township, La Salle county, Illinois, in 1878, a son of James and Mary 
Ann Follett. The father was always an active democrat, although during the 
Civil war this was a difficult situation to maintain. 

Elmer C. Follett attended the common schools and afterward spent three 
years as a high school pupil in Normal, Illinois, while for one year he attended 
the Valparaiso University Teachers College at Valparaiso, Indiana. He has 
spent his life in farming, in the nursery business and in the live stock business 
in Deer Park township and in South Ottawa township in La Salle county, 
except for four or five years when he was a tree trimmer. For twenty years 
he resided in Deer Park township and for the past two decades has been a 
resident of South Ottawa township, his home being just at the edge of the city 
of Ottawa, where he has developed an extensive small fruits farm. He has 
thoroughly studied the business and employs the most progressive and scientific 
methods of producing fruit of the finest variety. One of his lines also is 
raising asparagus, and a few years ago he attracted the attention of the 
University of Illinois by raising four thousand, nine hundred and ninety-eight 
asparagus plants out of five thousand planted, while the loss is normally from 
forty to fifty per cent. Such was his record that a representative of the uni- 
versity came to look over his establishment. Mr. Follett is also interested in 
the gas business, having a station located at his place. 

In politics Mr. Follett has always been a democrat and has frequently 
served as a delegate to the party conventions, standing loyally by the party 
organization during its lean years. He served for thirty years as precinct 
committeeman and built up the precinct, and his wife has also been active in 
party work. His father entertained Stephen A. Douglas at the time of the 
famous Lincoln-Douglas debates. 

It was in 1901 that Mr. Follett married Miss Edith Maude Stillwell, who 
was born and reared in Deer Park township, La Salle county, Illinois, and they 
are the parents of a son, Walter Arthur. They are members of the Baptist 
Church and Mr. Follett belongs also to the Masonic fraternity and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. His hobby has always been hunting and fishing 
and he was formerly a member of a club of that character, but his time and 
attention are chiefly given to his business interests and he has attained a 
position of leadership as a producer of small fruits in northern Illinois. 



JOHN R. COODSON 



On the roster of well known democrats of Douglas county appears the 
name of John R. Goodson. who is now postmaster at Newman. He was born 
in this county August 7, 1891, a son of Robert M. and Anna M. (Biggs) Good- 
son. The father was born in North Carolina and came to Illinois in 1870, 
settling in Douglas county, where he followed farming for almost a third of 



212 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

a century or until his death in IDOL'. He always voted with the democratic 
party and was a stanch advocate of its principles. His wife was horn in 
Douglas county, Illinois, her people having' come here from Clark county, 
Indiana, in the early '50s. Her brother, John Biggs, served with the Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry in the Civil war and was killed in the battle of Chattanooga. 
Mrs. Goodson survives and makes her home in Newman. 

The public schools of Newman afforded John R. Goodson his educational 
opportunities and he passed through consecutive grades to the high school. 
Reared to the occupation of farming, he continued to follow agricultural 
pursuits until 1!)17, when he enlisted in the army for service in the World 
war. He was stationed at the repair school in Peoria for a time and then went 
to Camp Jackson, South Carolina, where he remained until sent overseas with 
the July Automatic Replacement Division, remaining in Europe for nine months. 
He received his discharge at Camp Grant in May, 1919. 

Returning to his home. .Mr. Goodson again took up the occupation of farm- 
ing, which he followed until 1927, when he became a salesman, being thus 
employed for a year. In 1928 he established a confectionery store in Newman 
which he still owns. He has always been active in democratic politics and 
has worked with the local committee in getting out the vote on election days 
and in otherwise supporting the party, always working for the entire ticket. 
He attends all the local democratic meetings and he is a member of the 
Jeffersonian Club. On the 16th of July, 1934, he was appointed by President 
Roosevelt to the office of postmaster of Newman. 

In November, 1928, Mr. Goodson was united in marriage to Florence 
Schrader, a native of Bushnell, Illinois, who passed away April 26, 1930. Mr. 
Goodson holds membership in the Presbyterian Church and he belongs to the 
Masonic fraternity and to the American Legion, in which he has served through 
all of the offices and has taken an active part in Legion work. He likewise 
belongs to the Business Men's Club and is interested in all that pertains to 
the welfare and upbuilding of his home community, his efforts for the public 
good being far-reaching and beneficial. 



RENE HAVILL 



No history of the democratic party in Illinois would be complete without men- 
tion of the Havill family, for through two generations the name has been closely 
associated with political activity in Wabash county and the state and has ever 
been a synonym for progressiveness and high ideals in citizenship. Rene Havill, 
living in Mount Carmel, is filling the position of supervisor of paroles at Menard, 
and his father, Frank W. Havill, was for many years in public office. The latter 
was born at Roscoe, now Coshocton, Ohio, September 20, 1842, and in Friends- 
ville, Illinois, he married Miss Elizabeth Willman, a native of Mount Carmel. 
The Willman family came to Wabash county from Germany in 1830, at which 
time the father of Mrs. Havill entered land from the government, casting in his 
lot with the early settlers of this section of the state. Following their marriage 
Frank W. Havill and his wife settled in Mount Carmel, where he was first em- 
ployed as a laborer. He was soon elected to public office, serving first as marshal 
for a term of two years and then spending two years as street commissioner, while 
for one term he rilled the office of alderman from the first ward. When the 
country became involved in civil war he joined the Union Army, enlisting on 
July 25, 1861, and serving as a member of Company I, Fortieth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry. He was promoted to the rank of lieutenant and later was advanced to 
a captaincy, being in command of his company wdien honorably discharged 
July 25, 1865. In the meantime he had participated in many of the major battles 
id' that long and sanguinary conflict and went with Sherman on his celebrated 
march to the sea. He suffered gunshot wounds in his left shoulder, his right side 
and right leg, but the hardships of war never deterred him from his faithful 
performance of duty. He acted as assistant inspector of the First Division of 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 213 

tlic First Army Corps and served in the secret service as adjutant of Harrison's 
Tennessee cavalry in 1863. Following the close of hostilities he returned to 
Mount Carmel and in 1877 became editor of the Mount Carmel Register, in which 
he had purchased a half interest in 1872. The paper was then republican in its 
political complexion and in 1878 he made it an organ of the democratic party, 
advocating the party principles through the editorial columns. He was appointed 
postmaster of Mount Carmel by President Cleveland in 1885 and occupied that 
office until 1889, when he resigned at the time Benjamin Harrison became chief 
executive of the nation. In 1890 Mr. Havill was elected clerk of the supreme 
court and served in that office for six years. In 1896 he was elected clerk of the 
appellate court and acted in that capacity until 1902. In 1903 he was elected 
mayor of Mount Carmel and gave his attention to the direction of municipal 
affairs through a one-year term. Always a stanch and active democrat, he was 
recognized as a leader of the party in Wabash county and served for many years 
as a committeeman, while for four years he was chairman of the democratic 
county central committee. He also was a member of the democratic state central 
committee and he attended all of the state, congressional and judicial conventions. 
He was also a delegate to several national conventions and was widely known 
to the leaders of the party not only in Illinois but from other sections of the 
country as well. He passed away June 5, 1907, having for about a year survived 
his wife, who died on the 30th of July, 1906. Fraternally he was a Mason and 
attained high rank in the order, becoming a Knight Templar in Mount Carmel 
and a member of the Mystic Shrine in Chicago. He also belonged to the Eastern 
Star, to the Tribe of Ben Hur, to the subordinate lodge and encampment of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and to the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. He always proudly wore the little bronze button that proclaimed his 
connection with the Grand Army of the Republic, his membership being in T. S. 
Bowers Post. 

Rene Havill, who was born in Mount Carmel, Illinois, May 15, 1882, attended 
the grammar and high schools of his native city and the Orchard City Business 
College at Flora, Illinois. For one year he acted as his father's secretary and 
in 1902 was appointed official court reporter in the second judicial district, 
serving most capably in that office until 1914, when he was made assistant chief 
clerk under Secretary of State Stevenson. He occupied that position for two 
years and from 1916 until 1920 served in the state legislature, giving careful con- 
sideration to all the vital questions which came up for settlement. During this 
time he also served for two years as chief officer of the Illinois income tax depart- 
ment and from 1922 until 1931 he acted as special tax man for several large oil 
companies. In 1931 he became secretary to P. J. Knob, an attorney of Mount 
Carmel, with whom he was associated until July 1, 1933, when he was appointed 
by Governor Horner to the position of supervisor of paroles at Menard, Illinois. 
His record as a public official, and that of his father as well, reflects credit and 
honor upon the history of democracy in Illinois. Rene Havill has always dis- 
played an intense loyalty to democratic principles and has been an earnest party 
worker. He was precinct committeeman for several years and for four years 
occupied the chairmanship of the democratic central committee of Wabash 
county. He also served for four years on the democratic state committee and 
he has attended all of the state, congressional and judicial conventions since of 
age. Three times he has attended the democratic national conventions and at 
St. Louis, in 1916, served as an assistant sergeant at arms. For one term he 
filled the office of city commissioner and for several years has been a member 
of the school board of Mount Carmel, the cause of education finding in him a 
stalwart champion. 

On the 11th of August, 1906, Mr. Havill was married to Miss Amy Lee 
Snyder, who was born in Mount Carmel, January 29, 1884, and is a daughter of 
Charles and Martha (MeDaniels) Snyder, who were natives of Gibson county, 
Indiana. Their children are : Frank Walden, who was born June 21, 1907, and 
lives in Mount Carmel; and Charles, born May 4, 1916, and now a student in 



214 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Evansville, Indiana. Mr. Havill belongs i" the Masonic fraternity and to the 
Elks Lodge and is a loyal follower of the teachings and purposes of these societies. 
His faithfulness to any cause which he espouses is always one of his pronounced 
characteristics and the valuable work which he has done in public office ranks him 
as one of the representative men of the state. 



ERWIN HERMAN RUNKWITZ 

Erwin Herman Runkwitz, Superintendent of schools of St. Clair county. 
with offices in the courthouse at Belleville, was horn February l(i. 1872, in 
'Fallon township, where he now resides. His father, Herman Runkwitz, was 
also horn on the old family homestead and devoted his life to the occupation of 
farming. He was a son of Karl Runkwitz, a native of Altenburg, Germany, 
who came to the United States in 1834. Making his way across the country, he 
took np his abode in Illinois and purchased in 1839 what has since been known as 
the old Runkwitz homestead. He had learned the bookbinding trade in Ger- 
many, hot in Illinois he gave his attention to farming and did much to aid in 
the agricultural development of the southwestern part of the state. His son. 
Herman Runkwitz, espoused the cause of the Union at the time of the Civil 
war and went to the front with the boys in blue of Company E, Forty-third 
Illinois Infantry. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Aurlie Budina, was 
also a native of Germany. 

Erwin II. Runkwitz attended district schools of St. Clair county and after- 
ward spent one term as a student in the Southern Illinois State Teachers Col- 
lege at Carbondale. He next entered McKendree College at Lebanon, which lie 
attended for four years, being graduated on the 7th of June, 1894, with the 
Bachelor of Science degree. Four years later, or in 1898, Ins alma mater con- 
ferred upon him the Master of Science degree. In 1895 Mr. Runkwitz took up 
the profession of teaching in rural schools of St. Clair county, with which he 
was thus connected for six years. He then spent twenty-six years in the public 
schools of 'Fallon as a teacher and as principal of the high school. After the 
establishment of the township high school he became a member of its faculty 
and in 1931 he was elected county superintendent of schools on the democratic 
ticket. He is an able educator who has always imparted clearly and readily to 
others the knowledge that he lias acquired and who has always held high ideals 
before the teachers who are under his jurisdiction. 

In 1898 Mi*. Runkwitz was married to Miss Caroline Reuss, of Shiloh Val- 
ley township, St. Clair county, and they have become parents of three children: 
Alice, who is now the wife of J. W. Dunn, of 'Fallon township, St. Clair 
county; Erwin II., Jr., who is science teacher in the township high school at 
Marissa, Illinois; and Julius, at home. Mr. Runkwitz belongs to the Shiloh 
Valley Grange, No. 1807, the Belleville Turners, and he is a member of the St. 
Clair County Teachers Association, the National Education Association and the 
Schoolmasters Club. In politics he is a democrat and has always given stanch 
support to the party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He re- 
ceived the nomination in the last primary for county Superintendent of Schools. 



REV. SEBA E. MARSHALL 

Rev. Seba E. Marshall, chaplain of the Southern Illinois Penitentiary at 
Chester, was born in Ewing, Franklin county, November 16, 1896, a son of C. E. 
and Hester (Taylor) Marshall. The latter is a daughter of Richard and Nancy 
Taylor and a granddaughter of Edward Franklin, who was a sergeant in the 
Mexican war and who became one of the pioneer settlers of Illinois, Franklin 
county being named in his honor. The Taylor family has long figured prominently 
in tlie development of this section of the state and all have given political support 
to the democratic party. C. E. Marshall has likewise ever been an earnest demo- 




ERWIN HERMAN RUNKWITZ 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 217 

crat. lie was born in Jefferson county, Illinois, October 29, 1868, followed farm- 
ing in early manhood and later took up coal mining. For twelve years he filled 
the office of justice of the peace in Ewing township, Franklin county. 

Seba E. Marshall acquired his education under great difficulties, but his 
unfaltering determination and laudable ambition have enabled him to overcome 
the obstacles which he faced and step by step he has advanced until he is today 
a well informed and broad-minded man. He was a lad of only thirteen years 
when he was forced to leave school and later begin work in the mines, where he 
was employed until 1927. He was with the army for a few months during the 
World war, enlisting September 5 ,1918, but was not in active service. He then 
felt the call to become a preacher but knew that in order to be effective in the 
ministry he must have a wider education. Accordingly he attended a select school, 
in which he prepared for high school, and he became a freshman in high school 
at the age of thirty years. While thus pursuing his studies he worked intermittent- 
ly in the mines and utimately he became a student in the Southern Illinois State 
Teachers College at Carbondale, whereby he qualified for teaching and won his 
certificate. He has attended the summer sessions of that well known educational 
institution and is constantly increasing his usefulness through the development 
of his mental powers. He taught in schools of Benton for three years. He was 
teaching at the time of his appointment as chaplain. He was pastor of churches 
of Franklin county for eight years while going to school and teaching. In 1933 
he was appointed chaplain of the Southern Illinois Penitentiary at Chester and 
is now rendering an excellent account of himself in that position. He has become 
a minister of the Baptist denomination and is constantly reaching out alon«- lines 
of help and usefulness to his fellowmen. He served for four years on the city 
board of Benton. 

On the 24th of December, 1919, Mi". Marshall was married to Miss Nina 
D. Kirk, a daughter of James V. Kirk, a merchant, who is a supporter of the 
republican party, but Mrs. Marshall votes with the democratic party. Mi - . Mai-shall 
enjoys fishing and hunting when leisure gives him opportunity to indulge in those 
sports. Fraternally he is a Mason, was formerly identified with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and yet belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and 
the American Legion. 



DOUGLAS E. DALE 



Douglas E. Dale, sub-district manager for the Home Owners Loan Corpora- 
tion, with offices in Edwardsville, was born February 29, 1892, in the city where 
he yet resides, his parents being James B. and Rebecca Lee (Evans) Dale. The 
father was an early resident of Edwardsville, where he engaged in the real 
estate and insurance business and where he served as postmaster under President 
Cleveland. His father was Judge M. G. Dale, who occupied the bench of the 
county court. The mother of Douglas E. Dale was reared in Edwardsville and 
came of old Virginian stock. 

The public schools of his native city accorded Douglas E. Dale his educa- 
tional opportunities until he had graduated from the high school. Later he 
entered Illinois College at Jacksonville, where he completed his studies, after 
which he was employed by the Granite City Steel Company at Granite City, 
Illinois, starting in the shipping department. There he remained for sixteen 
years and steadily worked his way upward, various promotions bringing him to 
the position of superintendent of production. On a leave of absence from the 
steel company he joined the United States Army, going to Camp Taylor in 
Chillicothe, Ohio, where he entered the officers' training camp. He was com- 
missioned a second lieutenant of field artillery and received his discharge in 
Xovember, 1918. He has since been connected with the Reserve Officers Corps, 
in which he is a first lieutenant, and lie belongs to the American Legion. Al 
the close of his military experience he returned to the steel company, with which 
he remained until 1928, when he entered the life insurance business in connection 



218 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

with bis father in Edwardsville. Here they have since operated and have won a 
large Dumber of clients, their business having been developed along most sub- 
stantial lines. 

( >n the 30th of June, 1!''_'(), Mr. Dale was united in marriage to Miss Adelaide 
c. Naylor, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and they are the parents of a son, 
.lames Lee. 

Mr. Dale was reared a democrat and has never seen occasion to change his 
party allegiance. He assisted in organizing the Young Men's Democratic Club 
during the Wilson campaign and he lias remained a stanch supporter of the 
party. He served on the local committee of the Civil Works Administration and 
on the 10th of May, 1934, was appointed sub-district manager of the Home 
Owners Loan Corporation. His interest in community welfare has been evidenced 
in many practical ways. He cooperates in all movements for community up- 
building and for the advancement of civic standards. He belongs to the Edwards- 
ville Rotary Club, of which he is the president, and he is well known in Masonic 
circles, with membership in Edwardsville Lodge No. 99, of which he is a past 
master. He is likewise past high priest in his chapter and is the present district 
deputy grand master, a position which he has occupied for fifteen years. He is 
likewise very active in Mississippi Valley Consistory of East St. Louis and he 
has been accorded the honorary thirtv-third degree. 



MABEL REDDEN 



Mabel Redden has the distinction of being the only woman in Vermilion 
county ever elected to a county office and is the only woman in the state filling' 
the position of probate clerk. She has her offices in Danville, and the fact that 
she has been renominated is proof of the efficient, prompt and faithful manner 
in which she has discharged her duties. 

Miss Redden, a native of Rossville, Vermilion county, Illinois, is a daughter 
of William 1>. and Sarah (Remster) Redden. Her father, an attorney of Ross- 
ville, practiced continuously there until his removal to Danville in 1907, after 
which his attention was chiefly given to dealing in farm lands. A stalwart 
democrat, he three times served as a delegate to the national conventions of the 
party, twice when William Jennings Bryan was nominated and again when 
Woodrow Wilson was made the choice of his party for the presidential race. 
Mr. Redden passed away March 4, 1925. and is survived by his widow, who 
lives in Danville with her daughter. She, too, comes of a family that, like the 
Reddens, have been democrats for generations. To Mr. and Mrs. William 1>. 
Redden were born four children. The eldest, Forrest D., lives in Danville. 
James B., who is superintendent of highways at Morocco, Newton county. 
Indiana, married Hazel Law, a daughter of Delmar Law r , a banker of Morocco 
and one of the old-line democrats. Mr. and Mrs. James B. Redden have two 
children: Catherine, who was graduated from the Morocco high school in the 
spring of 1934; and Dorothy, a student in the Junior high school. The third 
member of the family. Curtis G. Redden, was a graduate of the University of 
Michigan, was for four years on the famous "Point a Moment - ' team and in the 
year 1903 was captain of both the baseball and football teams of the university. 
He was also left-end man on the All American team for about three years. He 
became a member of the National Guard and in 1898 served in the Spanish- 
American war, returning with the rank of captain, which he still held when he 
enlisted for service in the World war and went to France. Later he was com- 
missioned lieutenant colonel and subsequently became colonel of his regiment, 
which was a part of the Second or Rainbow Division. He was with the troops 
in Coblenz, in command of his regiment with the army of occupation, and it 
was after the armistice was signed that he became ill of pneumonia and passed 
away on the 16th of January, 1919. His remains were brought back to Dan- 
ville and interred in Springhill Cemetery. Not only did he make a brilliant 
military record but lie was also prominent in the social and public life of his 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 219 

community. He had been exalted ruler of the local lodge of Elks, and when 
the announcement of his death was made Bruce Campbell of the order delivered 
the memorial address. 

The other member of the family, Mabel Redden, was educated in the Ross- 
ville schools, passing through consecutive grades to her graduation from the 
high school. She next entered Oberlin College at Oberlin, Ohio, and later con- 
tinued her education in the University of Illinois. Turning to the business 
world, she served for six years as reporter of the Commercial News of Danville, 
after which she entered office by becoming a deputy county treasurer. She 
served in that capacity for four years and later was for four years secretary 
of the Fair, doing all the detail work. Her name was put on the democratic 
ticket as candidate for the office of probate clerk, the party leaders having 
sought her out to make her the nominee for the position. When she started 
her campaign she bought a second-hand Ford and traveled throughout the 
county. She was elected by a satisfactory majority and her excellent work 
as probate clerk has led to her renomination for a second term. She has saved 
money in the office, which she has turned over to the county when money was 
needed. She is secretary of the Probate Clerks Association of the State of Illi- 
nois, a position which she has occupied for three years, and she enjoys to the 
fullest extent the confidence and regard of the members of that organization, 
while in her home community she is well known socially and has a large circle 
of warm friends. 



DANIEL H. BARRY 



Daniel H. Barry, deputy internal revenue collector for Quincy, is num- 
bered among the prominent and popular young native sons of the city. He 
was born February 21, 1901, his parents being Daniel E. and Mary (Leahy) 
Barry, both of whom were natives of Adams county, Illinois, the latter born 
in Quincy. Daniel E. Barry departed this life in 1902 and on the 2d of October, 
1904, Mrs. Barry became the wife of Arthur R. Roy, assistant states attorney 
for Adams county, whose biography appears on another page of this publication. 

In the acquirement of an education Daniel H. Barry attended the parochial, 
grade and high schools of Quincy and also St. Francis College of this city. 
He served as deputy internal revenue collector for Quincy from 1919 until 
1921 and on the 20th of October, 1933, was again appointed to the office, the 
duties of which he has discharged in a most efficient and highly satisfactory 
manner. He is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
and has won many warm friends in fraternal and social as well as political 
circles of the city which has always been his home. 



GORDON R. JOHNSON 

Gordon R. Johnson, who is now serving as secretary to the superintendent 
of the Peoria police, comes of an old-line democratic family. His father has 
for many years been active in Illinois Democracy and is recognized as a militant 
worker for its success. Gordon R. Johnson was born in Farmington, Fulton 
county, this state, July 4, 1904, and is a son of H. V. and Essa (Russell) John- 
son, both of whom are natives of Fulton county, their families having been 
pioneer settlers there. For many years H. V. Johnson was an active factor in 
the real estate business in Peoria and in Fulton county and became widely 
known through his business as well as through his political connections. To 
him and his wife were born two children, the elder being H. V. Jr., who served 
in the World war and who has followed in his father's footsteps politically, 
becoming an active supporter of the democratic party. 

The younger son, Gordon R. Johnson, completed his education in the high 
school of Canton, Illinois, and since that time has been active in the real estate 
field, gaining a thorough familiarity with property values and doing much to 
promote realty transfers in Peoria. He can speak with authority upon property 



220 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

thai is on the market and in all his dealings has been actuated by a spirit of 
enterprise and progress. He turned from personal business interests, however, 
to official service when on the '-'"l of .May, 1933, Mayor Charles L. O'Brien 
appointed him to the position of secretary to the police department, in which 
capacity he is now serving, making an excellent record by his systematic dis- 
charge of duty. He has always voted with the democratic party, has labored 
to win victory for its candidates and is active in the organization of Junior 
Jeffersonians. 



KALPII VAN MATRE 



Richland county has no more loyal representative of Illinois democracy than 
Ralph Van .Mat re, popular postmaster of Olney, who has taken an extraordinarily 
active part in the political affairs of this locality, lie is a native of Richland 
county, his birth having occurred June 13, 1888, and he is a son of Joseph B. 
and Rosie (Pitzer) Van Matre. The father was born in the state of Ohio and 
came to Illinois with his family prior to the Civil war. He was a stock buyer all 
of his life. A democrat of the strongest type, he served one term as treasurer 
of Richland county, was a delegate to several judicial and congressional con- 
ventions, and was postmaster of Calhoun, Illinois, for four years under the 
Cleveland administration. His son, Sam .1. Van Matre, likewise was postmaster 
of Calhoun for eight years during the Wilson administration. Rosie (Pitzer) 
Van Matre was born in Warren, Indiana, and her people settled near Calhoun, 
in Richland county, soon after the close of the Civil war. 

Ralph Van Matre acquired his education in the grade and high schools 
of Olney, Illinois, after which, for a brief period, he engaged in stock buying. 
He was next manager of the O'Connor Wholesale Grocery Company for three 
years and then, in association with his brother, Samuel J., opened the well known 
Fairlawn addition, on which ground they built their grocery store. Steadily 
this business has increased, the result being the modern establishment now on 
the site. Mr. Van Matre. in recognition of his sterling service to the democratic 
party, was appointed postmaster of Olney May 20, 1933. He has been a com- 
mitteeman of the fifth precinct for eight or ten years. He has attended three 
state conventions as a delegate, and also many congressional and judicial con- 
ventions. He was one of the organizers and is a member of the Young Demo- 
crats Jeffersonian Club, and has always worked for the whole ticket in the 
campaigns. He has been of decided influence in political affairs and has always 
been an advocate of clean politics. 

Mr. Van Matre has been twice married. He was first united in marriage to 
Miss Evelyn Elliott, who is now deceased. By this union there was one daughter, 
Helen, who is now at home. Mr. Van Matre was married secondly in 1928 to 
Miss Elizabeth Boone, whose family were early settlers of Clay county, Illinois, 
but for the last forty years have resided in the state of Washington. Mr. and 
Mrs. Van Matre have two children, Louise and Pose Nan. 

Mr. Van Matre is a member of the Chamber of Commerce of Olney, the 
Illinois State Postmasters Association, and the National Association of Post- 
masters. He belongs to the Elks Lodge, No. 926, and is also a member of the 
Elm Street Christian Church of Olncv. 



ELNAR SORENSON 



Einar Sorenson, of Antioch, occupies the position of state inspector of the 
northern division of waterways of the department of public works and build- 
ings. A native of Chicago, he was born in 1886. His father, Sam Sorenson, 
a native of Denmark, sought the opportunities of the new y world and became 
an engineer on the St. Paul Railroad, in which capacity he was employed for 
many years. He always voted the democratic ticket and was an earnest party 
worker in Chicago. He wedded Mary Dewey, also a native of Denmark. 

Einar Sorenson was reared in the old thirtieth ward of Chicago and at- 




RALPH VAX MATRE 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 223 

tended the public schools there. In young manhood he entered the employ 
of the St. Paul Railroad and became an engineer, remaining with that road 
for twelve years. Later he entered the automobile business in Chicago as 
president of the Sorenson Motor Sales Company, handling the Rickenbacker 
cars. 

From the time he attained his majority Mr. Sorenson has heen a stalwart 
advoeate of the democratic party, active as a precinct worker, as captain and 
eommitteeman in the old thirtieth ward of Chicago. For eight years he was 
the democratic election judge in his precinct. He then entered the resort 
business by purchasing property on Channel Lake, near Antioch. and has de- 
veloped this continuously since. When the eighteenth amendment was repealed 
he entered the tavern business by establishing a first-class place at his resort. 
On coming to Lake county he had resolved to retire from active participation 
in party affairs, but on finding the democratic forces in such poor condition in 
the county, he reentered the harness and in 1931. was able to file petitions tor 
a candidate for a committeeman from every precinct in the county, thus giving 
to Lake county its full committee strength. In 1930 he was elected a member 
of the county committee and has served continuously since. In 19:>I> he was 
a candidate for congress from the old tenth district but was defeated in the 
primary. In 1934 he was appointed inspector of the northern division of 
waterways in the department of public works and buildings for the stale. 
Mr. Sorenson attended the state democratic conventions in 1932 and 1934 as 
a delegate and he is very active in organizations for the improvement anil 
conservation of the state waterways and natural lakes, his interest along this 
line well qualifying him for his work as a public official. In 1931 he was cam- 
paign manager for Peter Petersen, who was elected as the first democratic mayor 
of Waukegan in twenty years, and in 1932 Mr. Sorenson was chairman of the 
executive committee of the county committee. The same year he acted as chair- 
man of the picnic committee of the county organization, which netted the 
chest over one thousand dollars. 

In 1907 Mr. Sorenson was united in marriage to Eva Kautz, of ( hicago, 
and they are the parents of two sons and a daughter, namely: Raymond E. and 
Edward, who are associated with their father in business; and Eleanor A., 
a beauty culturist who conducts her shop at the Sorenson Resort at Channel 
Lake. The first named. Raymond E. Sorenson, is an active leader in political 
affairs in the younger set and occupies the presidency of the Antioch Demo- 
cratic Club. 

Mr. Sorenson has always found interest and recreation in hunting and 
fishing. In fact he is an ardent sportsman along these lines and he and his 
sons also do much in taxidermy, having many fine specimens which hang upon 
the walls of his resort at Channel Lake. 



ROBERT E. BOYER 



The name of Roberl E. Rover has long been an honored one in democratic 
circles in Adams county. He is now the candidate for the office of county 
treasurer and there is no doubt as to his election to the position. Mr. Boyer 
was born in Richfield township, this county, December 22. 1893, his parents 
being John L. and Louise (Koetzle) Boyer. The father was also born in 
Richfield township and is mentioned in connection with the sketch of Levis 
L. Boyer, brother of our subject, on another page of this work. 

Robert E. Boyer acquired his education in the grade and high schools of 
Liberty as a student under his brother, Lewis L.. and in early manhood took up 
the profession of teaching. For eight years he taught in Adams county and 
made an excellent record as an educator. He afterward spent fifteen years with 
the Earhart Motor Company of Quincy but owing to the condition of his 
health he was obliged to resign. When he had somewhat recovere I liis health 
he decided to enter the political field and made the race for county treasurer, 



224 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

being Dominated <>n the democratic ticket and being given a majority of four- 
teen hundred at the primary election in April, 1!»:>4. 

On the 28th of November, 1918, Mr. Boyer was united in marriage to 
Miss Ruth Sines, daughter of Rev. S. B. Sines. While they have no children 
of their own, they have reared Mrs. Boyer's young sister Helen, who became 
a member of their household when she was seven years of age. Mrs. Boyer has 
been closely associated with educational interests, having taught school for 
the past twenty years, during the latter part of which period she has been 
principal of the Ellington school. On the 9th of March, 1934, Francis G. 
Blair, state superintendent of public instruction, dedicated Ellington as a 
superior school, this being the only superior school in Adams or an adjoining 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Boyer are members of the First Christian Church of 
Quincy. Fraternally Mr. Boyer is a .Mason, with membership in Quincy Con- 
sistory, in which he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Kile. 
He also belongs to the Fraternal Order of Eagles and to the American Legion. 



WILLIAM E. MILLER 



William E. .Miller, a retired farmer living at Libertyville. has spent most 
of his life in northeastern Illinois and has witnessed many changes as the work 
of development and improvement has been carried steadily forward. Lorn in 
Oswego county. New York, September 2!). 1854, he is a son of W. A. and Susan 
(Graham) Miller, who were also natives of the Empire state. The father was 
both a farmer and brick maker and in 1855 he removed westward to Lake 
county. Illinois, where he worked as a brick maker, although soon after his 
arrival he hired out as a farm hand and cut grain with a cradle where the 
present estates of the wealthy are now seen along the north shore. The follow- 
ing year he and his wife went to Oconto, Wisconsin, where they conducted a 
boarding house for a lumber concern for six years. On the expiration of that 
period they returned to Lake county and Mr. Miller purchased a farm which be 
cultivated for about four years and then leased, establishing his home in Wauke- 
gan, where he entered the brick manufacturing business. Many of the older 
structures of the city are built from brick which he made. Following the 
Chicago fire of 1871 he removed to the city, where he manufactured brick that 
was used in the rebuilding of the metropolis. At a later date, however, he 
returned to Lake county, where he owned several farms. In 1898 he purchased 
one hundred and forty-one acres near Libertyville and made his home thereon 
until 1913, when he sold the property to Samuel Insull, it becoming a part of the 
latter "s model farm. 

William E. Miller attended the public schools of the various localities in 
which the family lived and for a year studied in an academy at Winnetka. 
Illinois. When twenty-two years of age he was elected road commissioner of 
the town of Libertyville and occupied the position for three years, while at the 
same time he did work on the home farm. In 1882 he was elected supervisor 
of Libertyville township and was reelected at each succeeding election until 
he had filled the position for sixteen terms, a record which indicates unmis- 
takably his fitness for the position and his fidelity to the duties of the office. 
During this time he was also elected president of the Lake County Fair Associa- 
tion and so served for seven years. While thus engaged he was one of two or 
three democrats on the county board and he had the distinction of being the 
first democrat to serve as chairman of the county board, acting in that capacity 
for two terms and also serving for three terms on the county board of review. 
being chairman thereof for two terms. In 1928 he was elected assistant super- 
visor of Libertyville township and has served continuously since. He east 
his first presidential vote for the democratic candidate in 1876 ami has con- 
sistently voted the ticket and worked for the party since that time except in 
the year 1896, when he differed with Bryan on the silver question. On several 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 225 

occasions he has allowed his name to be used to fill the county democratic 
ticket and during the past twelve years he has been a member of the Lake 
county democratic central committee. He is widely recognized as one of the 
leaders of the party in his county and his labors have been an effective force 
in promoting party strength. 

Mr. Miller remained on the farm with his father until the property was 
sold, when they built the home in Libertyville which he now occupies, and 
there the father passed away in 1929, at the very venerable age of ninety-two 
years. William E. Miller was a passenger on the first train over the Chicago & 
North Western Railway that ran through to Milwaukee. He and his sister, 
Clara S., make their home together in Libertyville. Another sister, Mrs. Rhoda 
Yager, now deceased, reared a family of seven children and one of her sons, 
Herbert Yager, who lives in Waukegan, has been very active in the democratic 
party and was a candidate for sheriff in 1934. Mr. Miller is well known in 
fraternal circles. He is a social member of the Modern Woodmen of America 
but gives the greater part of his time in connection with fraternal affairs to 
Masonry. He belongs to the Masonic lodge, in which he advanced to the office 
of worshipful master, has a life membership in the Royal Arch chapter at 
Waukegan, belongs to Waukegan Commandery, No. 12, K. T., and is also 
enrolled with the Nobles of Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine in Chicago. 



JOSEPH R. DOWNS 

Among the progressive and enterprising business men of Peoria is num- 
bered Joseph R. Downs, a substantial electrical contractor, who is widely known 
throughout this region not only because of his business activity but also be- 
cause of his prominence in democratic ranks. He represents a family that has 
long been connected with the party, his father before him having in his life- 
time been one of the militant democrats of the old school. 

Joseph R. Downs was born in Peoria, a son of John and Martha 
(McNamara) Downs, both of whom were natives of County Clare, Ireland. 
Determining to try their fortune in the new world, they crossed the Atlantic 
and cast in their lot among the early residents of Peoria, Illinois. Mi'. Downs 
was a man of fine intellectual attainments and an orator of pronounced ability, 
and he soon became an influential and valuable aid to the democratic organiza- 
tion of this city, serving in many campaigns as one of its leading speakers. He 
held the position of government ganger in a Peoria warehouse for a number of 
years and also served as deputy county clerk of Peoria county, making an ex- 
cellent record as a public official as well as a business man. To him and his 
wife were born four children : John, James C, Joseph R. and Agnes. The first 
named is deceased. 

Joseph R. Downs was educated in the schools of Peoria and when his text- 
books were put aside served an apprenticeship to the electrical trade, thoroughly 
mastering the business. For a number of years he was employed as a journey- 
man electrical worker, after which he founded his electrical engineering and 
contracting business, which he has since carried on, developing an enterprise 
of large proportions. He has outfitted most of the large buildings of modern 
construction in Peoria with their electric service and is considered an outstand- 
ing man in his field of endeavor in this part of Illinois. Every phase of the 
business is familiar to him and he thoroughly understands the great scientific 
principles which underlie his work, so that he has made valuable contribution 
to electrical engineering here. He holds membership in the National Electrical 
Contractors Association. In early manhood Mr. Downs was united in marriage 
to Miss Agnes Scanlan, a native of Peoria. lie is well known in social circles, 
being a member of the Mount Ilawley Country Club and also of the Creve 
Coeur Club. His outstanding characteristics gain for him the respect, confidence 
and friendship of all with whom he comes in contact and his public-spirited 
citizenship is a well known point in his life record. 



-'-'(i ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

HENRY CLAUDE McKINNEY 

Henry Claude McKinney, a member of the White comity bar. now serving 
as state's attorney, makes his home in Carmi. His birth occurred in Centerville, 
Illinois, Au»ust 31, 1ST."), his parents being Richard II. and Mary (Bozeman) 
McKinney. He pursued his education in the Carmi schools, taking work 
equivalent to the present day high school course. At the present time he is 
giving his attention to his official duties. Since attaining his majority he lias 
voted with the democratic party and in 1906 he was elected city attorney, which 
ot'tiee he filled until 1908. In November, 1932, he was elected state's attorney 
of White county by the greatesl majority ever given a democrat in his county — 
a fact indicative of his personal popularity- and is the present incumbent in the 
position. He has attended nearly all of the state and county conventions for a 
number of years and is recognized as one of the leading representatives of 
democracy in White county. 

During the Spanish -American war Mr. McKinney was made a captain of 
Company G, Sixth Missouri Volunteer Infantry, the command being stationed 
at Poplar Bluff, [Missouri, but was never called to active service at the front 

It was in Poplar Bluff, Missouri, on the 3d of December, 1902, that Mr. 
McKinney was married to Miss Cora Hetzler and they have become parents of 
four children, namely: Mary, Fiddie, Richard and Jack. In his fraternal rela- 
tions Mr. McKinney is a Knight of Pythias and an Elk, and his religious faith 
is that of tin 1 Primitive P>aptist Church. He has many sterling traits of charac- 
ter which have won him high regard, and in every relation of life he lias com- 
manded the respect and confidence of his fellowmen to an unusual degree. 



JOHN P. ARIMOND 



John P. Arimond, assistant manager of the Illinois Free Employment 
Service at Aurora, was born in Chicago, September 5, 1892, a son of Peter and 
Catherine (Hoffman) Arimond, both of whom were natives of Germany, in 
which country they were reared and married. They came to the United States 
about 1890, making their way direct to Chicago, where the father engaged in 
the butchering business until his death in 1915. His wife survived him for 
several years, passing away in 1921. Their family numbered four children: 
Henry; Peter, Avho was married in 1915 to Adeline Foertsch and who now 
has four children, Margaret, George, John and Matthew: Gertrude, who is 
the wife of August Steinhafel of Roby, Indiana, and the mother of one son, 
William : and John P., of this review. 

The last named was a pupil in the public schools of Chicago until he had 
completed the work of several grades, after which he attended night school, 
pursuing a course in traffic management for about a year and a half. He was 
then employed by the Independent Pneumatic Tool Company and his faithful- 
ness and efficiency are indicated in the fact that he continued with the company 
for sixteen years, acting as chief shipping clerk during the last five years of 
the period. He was previously for nine years with the wholesale house of 
Marshall Field & Company. On the 16th of March, 1933, he received appoint- 
ment to his present position as assistant manager of the Illinois Free Employ- 
ment Service at Aurora. 

Mr. Arimond was married to Miss Margaret Hoffman, a daughter of Matt 
and Catherine (Jacoby) Hoffman, who are residents of Aurora, where her 
father has retired from active business. Mr. and Mrs. Arimond have become 
parents of seven children: Hildegard, Harold, Marjorie, Donald, Richard, 
Patty Lou and Leonora. The family attends St. Nicholas Roman Catholic 
Church and Mr. Arimond belongs to the Holy Name Society and to the Catholic 
Order of Foresters. His political endorsement has always been given the 
democratic party, in the work of which he is actively and helpfully interested. 
He has served as ward committeeman for four years and in 1934 was a delegate 
to the state convention of the party at Springfield. Two years before he had 




HENRY CLAUDE MeKIXNEY 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 229 

attended the national convention in Chicago which nominated Franklin O. 
Roosevelt for the presidency, and in 1!)34 he was elected executive chairman 
of the Kane county democratic committee, in which connection he is rendering- 
important service to the organization. 

LESLIE 0. CAIN 

The town of Bowen, Hancock county, has as its efficient postmaster Leslie 
0. Cain, who was born in this county on the 5th of September, 1898, his parents 
being ilopson T. and Etta (Shourer) Cain. The mother passed away in 1931. 
The father, who throughout his active business life followed farming in Han- 
cock county, is now living retired in Bowen, where he has made his home for 
the past ten years. In politics he has always been a stanch democrat and has 
been an active party worker in his township. For twelve years he acceptably 
tilled the office of assessor of Chili township and he has also served as a school 
director. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Leslie 0. Cain attended the public schools of Chili township and was 
afterward a pupil in the high school of Bowen until he was graduated as a 
member of the class of 1917. The following year, when a youth of about twenty, 
he joined the United States Navy, enlisting in June. He served until October, 
1919, and was on duty on the United States Steamship George Washington, 
which was used in transporting troops to Europe. After receiving his honorable 
discharge he returned to Illinois, settling in Bowen, and for four or five years 
engaged in farming. He was subsequently connected with the feed and grain, 
business in Bowen for nine years, acting as manager thereof during the last 
three years of that period. He then resigned to become the postmaster of 
Bowen, having been appointed on the 3d of May, 1934. He also served for 
one year as a member of the city council but resigned that position when he 
was made postmaster. 

In 1924 Mr. Cain was united in marriage to Miss Ruth Winfield. He belongs 
to the American Legion, thus keeping in close connection with his old World 
war comrades, and he also has membership in the Christian Church. 



RAMA H. SWEET 



Rama H. Sweet is a representative of a family that for almost one 
hundred years has supported the democratic party in Illinois. He is now serving 
as property tax supervisor, with offices in the capitol at Springfield. He was 
born January 16, 1896, in Thompsonville, Franklin county, Illinois, his grand- 
father having settled in that county about a century ago. While the family 
lived in a republican township, all of the voters were stanch democrats, en- 
thusiastically supporting the party and its candidates. Dennis Huston Sweet. 
father of Rama II. Sweet, was born in Illinois and devoted his life to the 
occupation of farming. He took active part in the campaign work in support 
of William Jennings Bryan and he attended various political meetings and 
conventions, invariably accompanied by his son Rama, who went with his 
father when but four years of age. Dennis H. Sweet was a member of the 
Christian Church. He married Nancy E. Perryman, also a native of Illinois, 
and they represented old pioneer families of the state who came from Tennes- 
see and Kentucky. Both Mr. and Mrs. Sweet have passed away. The latter was 
a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Their children were as follows: 
Florence, who became the wife of Oris P. Sullivan, of Thompsonville, and died 
leaving one child, Ervin Sullivan; Alma, who died in infancy; Ona, who is the 
wife of Robert Russell, of Benton, Illinois, and has two sons, Elbert and Lee; 
Estella, the deceased wife of Edmund Little and the mother of one child. 
Thelma ; Lemay II., deceased, who married Kate Mayer and for his second wife 
chose Jessie Maheny, the children of Ins first marriage being Leslie. Ethel and 
Ruth and of the second marriage Bessie and Pollyanna. 



230 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Rama II. Sweet, the youngest child born to his parents, attended the 
graded and high schools <>i Thompsonville, being graduated trom the latter 
in 1913. The following year he entered Valparaiso University of Indiana, where 
he completed a course by graduation with the class of 1915. For two years he 
engaged in teaching the schools of Thompsonville and then entered the army, 
serving for one year, from February, 1918, until February, 1919. He was 
overseas with Battery D of the Three Hundred and Twenty-fifth Field Artillery 
of the Eighty-fourth Division and returned as a corporal. Alter reaching 
home he secured a position ill the Slate Bank of West Frankfort and after 
serving for ten years as assistant cashier was advanced to the office of vice 
president, in which he continued for a year. In March. 1!).'5:>, he received ap- 
pointment to the position of property tax supervisor for the Illinois Tax 
Commission and has since acted in that capacity, making an excellent record 
for efficient and loyal service. 

Mr. Sweet adheres to the religious faith of his mother, attending the 
.Missionary Baptist Church. Fraternally he is an Odd Fellow and he also has 
membership with the Modern Woodmen of America and with Earl ( owan Post 
Xo. 389 of the American Legion at West Frankfort. Bowling and hunting are 
his favorite pastimes and frequently occupy his attention when leisure permits. 
lie has always voted with and worked lor the interests of the democratic party, 
thus following in the footsteps of his ancestors, hut until the present time has 
never received political appointment as a reward for party fealty. 



JAMES MONROE THOMAS 

James Monroe Thomas, who is serving as lock tender at Marseilles, makes 
his home at 300 Broadway in that city. A native of Kentucky, he was born 
about ten miles from Lebanon, in Marion county, January 30, 1862, and is a 
son of W. M. and Cynthia (McClain) Thomas, both of whom have passed away. 
He acquired a public school education in his native state and there resided until 
forty-seven years of age, devoting his time and energies to the occupation of 
farming. He then went to Oklahoma and afterward to Kansas City, while 
at a later date he resided in Chillicothe, Illinois. In 1917 he came to Marseilles, 
Illinois, where he worked in factories and afterward in a cigar store. 

Mr. Thomas was married in 1884, on the day when Grover Cleveland was 
elected president of the United States. He east his vote that morning and 
proceeded to his wedding. He has never scratched a ticket since and has always 
been an active party worker. He served as judge of election for three or four 
years and while in Kentucky he worked against one of the strongest men in 
his county who was a candidate lor the office of county road supervisor. Later 
he helped elect the same man. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Thomas, who in her maidenhood bore the name of May 
Ida Mattingly, are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Thomas was formerly 
identified with the Modern Woodmen of America. On the 1st of May, 1933, he 
was appointed lock tender of Locks 9 and 10 at Marseilles and is now serving 
in that position. He has become well known during his residence here and 
has gained manv warm friends. 



REX O. MUDD, I). V. S. 

Dr. Rex O. Mudd, who for a number of years has engaged in the active 
practice of veterinary surgery of Biggsville, Illinois, was in February, 1934, 
appointed by Governor Horner to the office of bovine tuberculosis inspector. 
He was born in Strong-burst. Henderson county, May 26, 1890, a son of Benjamin 
L. and Mary E. (Stine) Mudd. The father "s birth occurred in Hitt, Missouri. 
January 28, 1852, and throughout his active life he followed the occupation 
of farming, in addition to which he taught school for twelve years in young 
manhood. For the past fifteen years he has lived retired in Stronghurst, enjoy- 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 231 

ing a rest which he has richly earned and well merits. His wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Mary E. Stine, was born near Stronghurst in 1857. 

Their son, Rex 0. Mudd, attended the public schools of his native town. 
completing the high school course, after which he engaged in teaching for 
five years in Henderson county but regarded this merely as an initial step to 
other professional labor. He next attended the McKillip Veterinary College of 
Chicago and was graduated with the class of 1919. He left college, however, 
to enter the army on the 21st of September, 1917. and was assigned to duty with 
the Three Hundred and Thirteenth Engineers at Camp Dodge, Iowa. In March. 
1918, he was transferred to Chicago for the purpose of finishing his veterinary 
course, as the army was in need of veterinary surgeons. When the war was 
over he completed his college work and entered upon the active practice of 
his profession in Biggsville, where he has now remained for fifteen years. For 
about eight years he has been engaged in tubercular eradication work for the 
state of Illinois and by reason of his broad and valuable experience in this 
field Governor Horner in February. 1934, appointed him bovine tuberculosis 
inspector, his territory being the entire state of Illinois, as he is subject to call 
to any part of the state. He is a member of the Illinois Veterinarians Association. 

On the 20th of April, 1919, Dr. Mudd was married to Miss Maude E. Essex. 
They attend and hold membership in the Presbyterian Church and Dr. Mudd 
also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He has been very active 
in democratic organization work and is now serving as alderman of Biggsville. 
His life has been governed by principles which neither seek nor require disguise. 
He has led a busy and useful life, holds to high ideals of professional service 
and is equally loyal and progressive in all matters of citizenship. 



GRENDEL F. BENNETT 

Grendel F. Bennett, master in chancery of Clark county and a well known 
attorney of Marshall, was born October 10, 1900, in the county where he still 
resides, his parents being Norman and Nora (Barbee) Bennett, who are men- 
tioned elsewhere in this work. After attending the grade and high schools of 
Marshall he entered the University of Illinois as a law student and received 
his LL. 1>. degree in 1926. He then began practice in Paris, this state, where 
he remained until 1928, and since that time he has maintained his office in 
Marshall, where his clientage has steadily grown in volume and importance. 
so chat he ranks today among the leading young lawyers of Illinois. 

Mr. Bennett has followed in the political footsteps of his father and 
has given active support to the democratic party since of age. In 1928 he was 
the party candidate for the office of state's attorney but was defeated and in 
1932 was the unsuccessful candidate for the office of circuit judge. He attends 
all the congressional and judicial conventions of his party and his loyalty 
thereto is one of his pronounced characteristics. 

In 1926 Mr. Bennett was united in marriage to Miss Irene Taubeneck. a 
native of Clark county, Illinois, and a daughter of O. O. and Effa (Hall) 
Taubeneck. members of an honored pioneer family of this county. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bennett are the parents of a daughter, Nancy C. Mrs. Bennett is a member 
of the Women's Democratic Club of Clark county. 

The military record of Mr. Bennett covers service with Company A. One 
Hundred and Twenty-sixth Machine Gun Battalion. He enlisted in 1918 and 
went overseas, where he was on duty until the signing of the armistice. He 
received his discharge from Camp Grant in April, 1919. and he is now a member 
of Clark County Post No. 90 of the American Legion, of which he is a past 
commander, while his wife is a member of the Legion Auxiliary. They are 
well known in social circles and enjoy the goodwill of all because of their 
sterling traits of character. Mr. Bennett is now serving as master in chancery 
through appointment in September, 1933, and his record in office is a creditable 
one. 



232 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

OTIS M. LAMAE 

Otis M. Lamar, postmaster ;it Rosielare, is one of the stalwarl democrats of 
Hardin county who have conn- into office with the accession of democracy to the 

place of political power in this country. A native of Hardin county, Illinois, 
he was born July 18, 188!), his parents being William Thomas and Laura (Staley) 
Lamar. The father was elected on the democratic ticket to the office of sheriff' 
of Hardin county for the term from 1902 until l!H)(i, was assessor and treasurer 
from 1906 until 1910 and was county commissioner from 1!H() until 1918, thus 
taking active and prominent part in shaping the political history of the county. 

Otis M. Lamar acquired a common school education and he is now active 
in the wholesale and retail oil business, representing the Sinclair Oil Company in 
Hardin county. At the time of the World war, however, all business and per- 
sonal considerations were put aside and he enlisted in 1918, becoming a private 
in Headquarters Company of the Fifty-fourth Infantry of the Sixth Division. 
He was overseas for one year and served for fifty-four days in the front lines, 
being on active duty in Alsace-Lorraine and in the Argonne drive. His name is 
on the membership rolls of the American Legion. 

On the 14th of November, 1916, in Rosielare, Illinois, Mr. Lamar was mar- 
ried to Miss Edna Davis and they are the parents of three children, Marcella, 
Anita Ruth and Harold. Their religious faith is that of the Christian Church, 
and Mr. Lamar is also identified with the Masonic fraternity. His political 
support has been unfalteringly given to the democratic party since age con- 
ferred upon him the right of franchise and since that time he has been an active 
party worker. He has attended all the county and state conventions since reach- 
ing the age of twenty-one years and was a delegate to the state convention in 
Springfield in April, 1934. He has been precinct committeeman of Rosielare 
since the 1920s. He served as chairman of the county central committee from 
1926 until 1928, and on the 24th of November, 1933, he was appointed post- 
master of Rosielare, in which capacity he is now serving, the duties of the office 
sharing his activities in the field of business. 



FRED L. WATTS 



Fred L. Watts, a leading farmer of Ogle county who is well known in 
democratic ch'cles and who well deserves mention in the record of Illinois 
Democracy, was born in Mount Morris on the 17th of February, 186!*. His 
father, William H. Watts, was born in Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1819 and 
came to this state about 1836, settling in Ogle county, where he homesteaded 
three hundred and twenty acres of land two and one-half miles south of Mount 
Morris. It was virgin soil which he converted into rich and productive fields, 
spending his remaining days thereon, his labors resulting in making this 
property a valuable farm. In politics he was an ardent democrat and took an 
active interest in the local campaigns. He died in 1899, while his wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Anna Emila Ankney. was born in Hagerstown, Mary- 
land, in 1832 and passed away in 1898. 

Their son, Fred L. Watts, after attending the rural schools and following 
his graduation from the Mount Morris high school, matriculated in Mount 
Morris College, where he pursued his studies for three years. When he was 
but seventeen years of age his father started him out to get democratic votes 
by hauling the voters to the polls, furnishing him with a team for that purpose. 
He has since been active in all succeeding campaigns and has served con- 
tinuously as a member of the democratic county central committee for the last 
twenty years, while at the present writing he is also a member of the county 
executive committee. He is serving on the farm adjustment committee of 
Ogle county and as a member of the drought relief committee in this county. 
He has always been an able financial supporter of the party, lint has never 
been a candidate for office. In young manhood Mr. Watts began farming on 
his own account and continued to follow agricultural pursuits from 1894 until 




OTIS M. LAMAR 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 235 

1902. In the latter year lie established his home in Mount Morris, where he 
opened a grocery store and also dealt in harness and horse goods, making his 
home in the town from 11)02 until 1928. 

In 1894 Mr. Watts married Fannie Felker, who passed away December 25, 
1923, and in 1927 he wedded Elizabeth Slifer. He is well known in lodge 
circles as a Mason and has advanced high in that order, as is indicated by the fact 
that he is now a Shriner. He consistently follows the teachings and purposes 
of the craft and is a firm believer in its basic principles. 



THOMAS R. AUBREY 

Thomas R. Aubrey, who has retired from business and makes his home in 
Bartonville, was born in Hardin county, Kentucky, September 20, 1868, a son 
of G. G. W. and Mary Elizabeth (Burris) Aubrey, both of whom were natives of 
Kentucky and were representatives of old pioneer stock of that state who 
came there from Virginia. The father of Thomas R. Aubrey was a veteran of 
the Mexican war and also served with the Union Army throughout the Civil 
war. His family numbered ten children, eight sons and two daughters, all of 
whom became good democrats. 

Thomas R. Aubrey, the seventh son, was educated in Mercer county, Illinois, 
to winch place his parents removed when he was two years of age. When his 
school days were over he became an employe of the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad, acting as foreman and timekeeper. The same patriotic spirit 
which prompted his father to serve in two wars led him to enlist for service 
in the Spanish-American war as a member of Company A. Ninth Illinois In- 
fantry, with which he went to Cnba. taking part in the fighting on that island. 
After the war he remained in Illinois until 1901, when he went to Kansas as an 
employe of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company, and later he 
engaged in railroad work in Chillieothe, Illinois. At length he was pensioned by 
the railroad in 1930 and he is now living retired in Bartonville. 

Mr. Aubrey has been in politics all his life. Someone said of him: "He 
is a veritable democratic wheel horse — one of the boys who has carried the 
banner in and out of season — always a virile, forceful democrat." For twenty 
years he served as precinct committeeman at Chillieothe and he has been a 
delegate to three state conventions. In 1926 he became mayor of Chillieothe 
and gave to the city a businesslike and progressive administration. He is well 
known through other connections, having been president of the Brotherhood 
of the Illinois Division of the Santa Fe Railroad. He belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Masonic 
lodge, and he is at all times loyal to any cause which he espouses. He can be 
counted upon to further any measure with which he becomes allied and all 
who know him bear testimony to the sterling worth of his character. 



( HARLES CERMAK, JR. 

Charles Cermak, Jr., of Antioch, has the distinction of being one of the 
youngest committeemen of Illinois, and it is an acknowledged fact that he is 
one of the livest and most energetic of the younger democrats of the state, 
who have done so much to lift the party to its present elevation. He typifies 
the spirit of the younger democracy, which is inspired by the achievements of 
those old champions of Jeffersonian principles, and which has enabled them to 
give the utmost of their talent and energy in the fight for supremacy. 

Charles Cermak, Jr., is a native of Chicago, Illinois. He was born October 
1, 1911, and he is a son of Charles, Sr. and Ann (Misicka) Cermak. The father 
was a native of Czecho-Slovakia and came to the United Slates when he was 
only eleven years of age. Most of his active life he resided in the city of 
Chicago, where he was in the retail liquor business for many years, and all 
during this period he was an active supporter of the democratic party through 
all of its campaigns. His wife was likewise a native of Czecho-Slovakia. In 



236 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

1 !>:24 the rather moved the family to Antioch, Illinois, where he entered the 
grocery business, and there Ins son ( harles finished his education, Ins siudies 
there and in Chicago having been pursued in both the public and the parochial 
schools. 

Alter graduating from high school, Charles Cermak, Jr., entered business 
with his father, and when he had reached his majority, he immediately became 
quite active in democratic party affairs. In 11)34 he was elected a member of 
the democratic county committee, and also in the same year he was a delegate 
to the democratic state convention, lie is secretary and treasurer ol the 
Antioch Democratic Club, and altogether is an outstanding party worker. 
Young, energetic, and inspired with the new success of the democratic party 
in Illinois, he has given much to the work, and, as noted, he is one of the youngest 
committeemen in the state of Illinois. 

Mr. Cermak is president of the Keynoters Club of the St. Peters Church of 
Antioch, and he is also a member of the Holy Name Society. Needless to write 
that his religion is that of the Roman Catholic Church. Mr. Cermak is widely 
known as a very talented vocalist. 



WILLIAM ETHELHERT BRADBURY 

Crawford county numbers William Ethelbert Bradbury among her native 
sons. He was born of the marriage of Presley G. and Jennie K. (Kelly) Brad- 
bury, to whom extended reference is made elsewhere in this work. He received 
a public school education in Robinson and after leaving high school entered 
the University of Notre Dame in Indiana to prepare for a legal career. He 
was graduated therefrom in 1916, at which time the LL. B. degree was con- 
ferred upon him, and in the same year he began active practice in Robinson 
in association with his father. The following year, however, he enlisted for 
service in the United States Army, this country having entered the World 
war. He was sent to the Fourth Officers Training School and was on duty as 
a first-class private at Camp Custer. Later he was commissioned a second 
lieutenant of Infantry, U. S. A., on the 26th of August, 1917, and was assigned 
to the infantry replacement and training camp at Camp Lee, Virginia. His 
next transfer made him a member of the Ninety-fifth Division at Camp Sherman, 
Ohio, and in September, 1917, he was assigned to the Headquarters Troop, 
Ninety-fifth Division, U. S. A., with which he remained until the end of the 
war. receiving his discharge June 17. 1919, after spending six months in the 
Base Hospital at Camp Sherman, Ohio, and having five operations due to an 
injury received while training. He then returned to the private practice of 
law and has concentrated his efforts and attention largely upon his profes- 
sional duties, which have constantly grown in volume and importance. He 
belongs to the both the Crawford County and Illinois State Bar Associations 
and enjoys the respect and trust of his colleagues and contemporaries. 

Mr. Bradbury is a member of Ernest M. Coulter Post No. 69 of the 
American Legion, in which he has held all of the offices. He was commander in 
1923 and he served for three years as department insurance officer, while 
since 1919 he has been service officer of Crawford county. In 1923 he was 
a delegate to the state convention of the Legion and was elected a delegate at 
large to the national convention which was held in New Orleans. He served 
on the national convention legislative committee in 1923 and 1924, and at the 
twenty-third district meeting he was elected a delegate to the national con- 
vention at San Francisco. He also served on the national convention legislative 
committee in 1925 and was elected that year a district delegate to the national 
convention at St. Paul. He served as judge advocate for Crawford county, 
has been service officer for the county, also service officer for twenty-third 
district and state chairman of the committee of the Federation Interallies Des 
Anciens Combattants. He likewise belongs to the Masonic fraternity and his 
loyalty to any cause which he espouses is one of his marked characteristics. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 237 

LOUIS A. XACK 

Among Galena's attorneys who occupy an enviable professional position 
is numbered Lonis A. Naek, who has practiced here since 192-4. He was born in 
this city May 23. 1901, his parents being Joseph M. and Clara (Mosler) Xack. 
The father was born in Galena, Illinois, July 8, 1865, and the mother is a native 
of Bellevue, Iowa. Joseph M. Xack has been a practicing attorney of Galena 
since 1896 and has made continuous and gratifying progress in his chosen 
calling. As a democrat he has been an effective worker and has served for six 
years as deputy circuit clerk, occupying the position from 1888 until 1896. 
He was also a member of the senatorial committee for about twenty-five years. 

Louis A. Xack, after attending public and parochial schools of Galena, 
was graduated from high school with the class of 1918. He prepared for the 
bar as a student in the law school of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor 
and was graduated in 1924. Thus thoroughly qualified by comprehensive pre- 
liminary training, he entered upon the work of the profession in the same year 
and has since practiced in his native city, where step by step he has advanced, 
being recognized as an able attorney who prepares his cases with thoroughness 
and care and presents his evidence in clear and forceful manner. 

On the 27th of June, 1925, Mr. Xack was united in marriage to Helen 
Waldron and they are the parents of two daughters, Lenore and Joan. They are 
communicants of the Catholic Church and Mr. Xack belongs to the Knights 
of Columbus and to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Since old 
enough to take active interest in party work Mr. Xack has been a democrat and 
was elected precinct committeeman in 1932 and in 1934 was reelected. He has 
never sought office outside the strict path of his profession but in 1925 was 
appointed city attorney and has served since, covering a period of nine years, 
which is indicative of the excellent work he has done in that position. 



J. EARLE WILLIAMS 



J. Earle Williams, justice of the peace at Springfield, was born near Berry- 
ville, Virginia, September 15, 1902. He comes of a family that has long been 
actively associated with democracy. His grandfather was A. B. Williams, who 
was a democratic attorney in Washington, D. C, connected with the attorney 
general's office during the Cleveland administration. Harry Williams, father 
of J. Earle Williams, was a construction engineer and he, too, was a stanch 
democrat. He married Emma Everhardt and in 1898 the family removed to 
Chicago, where they lived for a little more than a year. They came to Spring- 
field in 1905. 

J. Earle Williams was at that time a lad of about three years. He received 
his early educational training in parochial schools and afterward attended 
the St. Xavier preparatory school at Cincinnati, Ohio, and the Springfield high 
school. He next entered Loyola University of Chicago, working his way 
through that institution, and subsequently he became a student in the Lincoln 
College of Law, receiving his LL. B. degree therefrom in 1926, while in 1927 
Loyola conferred upon him his Master's degree. He entered the financial 
field with the Merchants & Manufacturers Company, with which he remained 
for a time, and later was with the legal department of the Commercial Credit 
Trust Company of Chicago. While there he obtained a scholarship that en- 
titled him to an eleven months' course in finance at Cambridge University in 
England and he also received half salarv and all expenses while abroad in 1928 
and 1929. 

Mr. Williams returned to Springfield in 1930 after a period of brilliant 
political activity in which he spoke in various campaigns, starting with the 
Brennan campaign in 1923 and continuing through until he was campaign 
manager for Bruce Campbell in 1930. On the 8th of May. 1933, he was elected 
justice of the peace and has very acceptably filled that office, his decisions 



238 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

being fair and impartial. The work occupies practically his entire time and 
he has refused to become a candidate lor other official positions, lie has never 
ceased his activity in support of the party, however, and is now a director of 
the Roosevelt-Homer Democratic Organization and a director of the .Jefferson 
Young Men's Club, while of the regular Democratic Club of Sangamon county 

he is the president. 

On the 5th of July, L932, Mr. Williams was married to Miss Leona Brown, 
of Springfield, whose parents, Griff and Lois (Shuck) Brown, were formerly 
of Kentucky and represented old democratic families of that state. Mr. and 
Mrs. Williams have one daughter, Earleona. Mr. Williams enjoys motor boat- 
ing and owns a boat which has been named Earleona for his daughter. He 
likewise finds keen pleasure in a game of golf and his social nature further 
finds expression in his membership in the University Club of Springfield. 



MRS. JULIA SHUGURE 

Mrs. Julia Shugure, who has the distinction of having been the organizer 
of the Clinton County Women's Democratic Club, makes her home in Centralia. 
A lifelong resident of Illinois, she was born in Murphysboro, -January 6, 1871, a 
daughter of William E. and Mary D. (Riggs) Herring, who were also natives of 
Jackson county, where their people were among the first settlers. Her father 
was a stationary engineer and in politics was a stanch and active democrat who 
always voted the straight ticket. He died in 1894, his wife surviving until 1929. 

After acquiring a public school education in -Jackson county, Julia Herring 
remained at home until her marriage in 1892 to P. II. Strawhun, a son of William 
Strawhun, who was well known in democratic circles in this section of the state 
while his grandfather, who lived in Rolla, Missouri, was elected representative 
to the Missouri legislature. P. II. Strawhun was a mine operator, continuing 
a prominent representative of industrial activity in Jackson county until his 
death in 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Strawhun were married in Jackson county but 
soon afterward removed to Centralia, Marion county. They became parents 
of three children, of whom two died in infancy. The surviving son, Henry B. 
Strawhun, was born in Jackson county, where he received his education. He 
afterward followed railroading until September 17, 1917, when he enlisted in 
the United States Army and was sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, where he was 
on duty with the Three Hundred and Twenty-fifth Machine Gun Battalion. 
Later he was made to]) sergeant and transferred to the ambulance corps, with 
which he continued until discharged June 14, 1919. He then returned home and 
again followed railroading until appointed by Governor Henry Horner as rail- 
road inspector for the Illinois Commerce Commission in 1933. He now occupies 
offices in the state capitol. In politics he has always been a democrat, giving 
unwavering allegiance to the party. 

Mrs. Shugure 's second husband, M. C. Shugure, was born in Indianapolis, 
Indiana, August 18, 1868, and for the past thirty-six years has been a conductor 
on the Illinois Central Railroad. He is of Trish lineage, and, like the majority 
of people whose ancestors have come from the Emerald Isle, he has always been 
a stanch democrat. 

Mrs. Shugure, too, has long been interested in the principles of democracy 
and even as far back as 1896 she was active in the campaign work, supporting 
William Jennings Bryan. Since 1922, when franchise was conferred upon 
women, she has labored untiringly for the success of her party and its candidates 
and her efficiency was recognized when in 1930 she was elected precinct commit- 
teewoman, in which position she has since served. Many times she has been 
a delegate to congressional and judicial conventions and in 1932 she was elected 
a delegate to the national convention in Chicago, to which her son, H. B. Straw- 
hun, Avas also a delegate from Jackson county. In 1932 she became one of the 
organizers of the Clinton Count v Women's Democratic Club and was chosen its 




MRS. JULIA SHUGURE 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 241 

chairman, in which capacity she lias since served, the club being' recognized as 
one of the strongest and most capable democratic women's clubs in the state. 
She received a letter from Postmaster General Parley commending her for her 
work and for the thorough efficiency of the club as a whole. During the last two 
campaigns she has made speaking tours of the county on behalf of the entire 
ticket and her addresses are always based upon a thorough understanding of 
political conditions and opportunities. The democratic club of which she is 
general chairman sent Postmaster General Farley a check to help carry on 
the campaign in 1932. 

Mrs. Shugure has also been unusually active in War Mothers organizations. 
She belongs to the American War Mothers and is president of Sunshine Chapter 
No. 30, of Centralia, in which she has filled all of the offices, and likewise various 
state offices in the organization. She is now a past president of the Illinois 
Chapters of War Mothers and for nine years she filled the important office of 
state organizer, while at the present time she is the national chairman of hospital- 
ization. She has every reason to be proud of having been called to this position, 
which is one of the greatest importance to World war veterans. In 1933, through 
the efforts of Mrs. Mary E. Spence of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, she was presented 
with a beautiful American flag by Mrs. Charles Augustus Robinson of Paris, 
France, who is at the head of this department. The honor came in recognition 
of the fact that she had been instrumental in securing the largest number of 
members for her local chapter and for organizing the largest number of new 
chapters in the state during her term of office. In 1933, on Mothers Day, she 
represented the national organization of Veterans of Foreign Wars in placing 
a wreath on the grave of the unknown soldier in Arlington Cemetery. She made 
the trip to France with Group M of the Gold Star Mothers, sailing from Iloboken, 
on the George Washington, and landing at Cherbourg. Her visit abroad covered 
seven weeks. While not a Gold Star mother in the sense of having lost a son 
on European battlefields, she was given the privilege of making the trip by a 
friend in recognition of the splendid work she had done for the boys and for 
Cold Star mothers. She filed and received on three hundred and fifty-seven 
claims for ex-service men, on one hundred and thirty-two claims for Gold Star 
mothers, on seven claims for Gold Star fathers, three for widows and one claim 
for a sister. She was instrumental in finding the burial places of three boys for 
their mothers, three soldiers having never been heard from after the war, and 
one was found in England. Mrs. Shugure was also instrumental in obtaining 
seven hundred and seventy-seven flags for Gold Star mothers from the govern- 
ment. While she was state president she visited every chapter of the organiza- 
tion in Illinois and is today not only widely known in this state but throughout 
the country by reason of her forceful activities in this field. She has membership 
in the United States Flag Association, has been invested with the title of Daugh- 
ter of the Flag and elected to life membership as the result of securing three 
living flags. She was made a life member and is a trustee of the War Mothers 
Memorial House in Aurora, Colorado, and the trusteeship will continue during 
her lifetime. She belongs to the American Legion Auxiliary, the ladies' auxiliary 
of United Trainmen, Ben Hur Lodge and Rebekah Lodge, the ladies' auxuliary 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, with which she has been associated 
for forty-two years. She is a director of the Salvation Army of Illinois and 
of the United Charities of Illinois, and her interest in community affairs is 
also shown in her membership in the Centralia Chamber of Commerce. Her 
entire life has been actuated by a spirit of helpfulness that has reached out 
along many lines in a constantly broadening sphere of usefulness. 



HAROLD A. STONE 



Harold A. Stone, of Woodstock, is now serving as a maintenance patrolman, 
having been appointed to highway service on the 4th of May, 1934. Woodstock 
claims him as a native son, his birth having here occurred March IS, 1911, hi- 



242 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

parents being Lynn A. and Lucille (Hurley) Stone. The father is still living, 
but the mother passed away March 4, 1929. 

In the acquiremenl of an education Harold A. Stone attended St. Marie's 
parochial school of Woodstock and later the high school of this city, from which 
he was graduated in 1929. In the fall of 1930 he entered the University of 
Notre Dame, where he remained a student for two years. He is a member of the 
Catholic Church and of the Knights of Columbus. 

Mr. Stone was active in the democratic campaign of 1932 and was elected 
precinct committeeman in April, 1934. On the 4th of May following he was 
appointed highway maintenance patrolman and is now serving in this position. 
He is chairman of the McHenry County Democratic Young Peoples Organiza- 
tion and he is one of the leaders among the younger democrats of his section 
of the state. His belief in the party will continue him as an active party worker 
and he will probably be heard from in larger measure in the future. 



HUGH J. GORMAN 



Hugh J. Gorman, postmaster at Peotone, was born in Will township. Will 
county, Illinois, March 4, 1900, a son of Edward W. and Anna J. Gorman, who 
are now residents of Kankakee county, Illinois. The father became an active 
democrat and still gives unfaltering support to the party. Thirty years ago 
he served Will township as assessor and he was for years township supervisor, 
making a creditable record in office by the prompt and faithful discharge of 
the duties that devolved upon him. 

Hugh J. Gorman acquired his education in the local schools and in 1919 
he took up the occupation of farming on his OAvn account, following it con- 
tinuously until 1926, when he turned his attention to the business of general 
auctioneering, in which he engaged until February 1, 1934, when he became 
acting postmaster at Peotone. He has since been commissioned and is now 
the incumbent in the office for a four-year period. He had previously filled 
other positions of public trust, having been assessor of Peotone township for 
six years, while for a time he served as deputy county sheriff for his district. 
For eight years he was precinct committeeman and was a delegate to the 1932 
state convention of the democratic party in Springfh Id. No one has ever 
had occasion to question his political position. He fearlessly and courageously 
defends the principles in which he believes and democracy has no more loyal 
supporter in Will county. 

On the 26th of January, 1921, Mr. Gorman was muted in marriage to Miss 
Grace Gertrude McGowan and to them have been born five children, as follows: 
Hugh Joseph, who died in infancy; Patrick; Dennis Jerome; John Al Edward, 
who was named for Alfred E. Smith ; and Hugh James. The religious faith 
of the family is that of the Catholic Church and they are communicants of 
St. Joseph's parish. Mr. Gorman also belongs to the Knights of Columbus. 
From his infancy to the present time he has resided in Will county, where he 
has a wide acquaintance, and by reason of the sterling traits of bis character 
he has always enjoyed the goodwill and friendship of those with whom he has 
been associated. 



FREDERIC V. PACQUER 

Frederic V. Pacquer, highway maintenance patrolman and a resident of 
Atkinson. Illinois, was born in Atkinson township, Henry county, May 22, 1905. 
His parents, Peter and dementia (Steyaart) Pacquer, were natives of Holland, 
in which country they w T ere reared and married. Soon afterward they soup-lit 
the opportunities of the new world and established their home in Illinois. The 
mother has now passed away. The father passed away July 26, 1934. He had 
been in the employ of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad for thirty- 
seven years. In politics he was always an active democrat. 

Frederic V. Pacquer spent his youthful days under the parental roof and 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 24:} 

attended the public schools of Atkinson, where later he also pursued a business 
course. He then went to work for II. A. Reschke, a construction contractor of 
Geneseo, in whose employ he remained until he became highway maintenance 
patrolman on the 6th of February, 1933. He has since occupied tins position 
and in office has manifested the same spirit of faithfulness to duty that charac- 
terized his work along building lines. 

On the 14th of October, 1931, Mr. Pacquer was married to Miss Florence 
Eeckhout, of Atkinson, and they have one son, David John. The parents attend 
St. Anthony's Catholic Church. Mr. Pacquer has always voted with the demo- 
cratic party and is an active worker in support of its principles, laboring con- 
sistently for the success of its candidates for office. 



JOHN J. WELLNITZ 

John J. Wellnitz, master in chancery at Joliet and a member of the bar of 
this city since 1899, was born in LaSalle, Illinois, May 25, 1878, a son of Anthony 
and Mary Wellnitz. The father, who was an ardent democrat, died in April. 
1933, while the mother is still living. 

After completing his public school education by a course in the LaSalle 
high school John J. Wellnitz took up the study of law in the office and under 
the preceptorship of M. T. Maloney of Ottawa, where he was admitted to the bar 
in 1898. The following year he came to Joliet, his parents having previously 
removed to this city, and has practiced here since, making steady progress in 
a profession where advancement is proverbially slow but wherein he has dis- 
played those qualities which make for success at the bar. In 1909 he was chosen 
city attorney and filled the office until 1911. He had previously been assistant 
city attorney from 1903 until 1905 and thus brought to the duties of his position 
wide and valuable experience in that field. He is also a member of the public 
library board of Joliet, having served in this capacity for twelve years. On 
the 1st of July, 1933, he became master in chancery and is now occupying the 
office. He has always been an active democrat since he became a voter and for 
many years acted as precinct committeeman, continuing in the office until 1932. 
In fact he had been in the position for twenty-six years — a record that has 
seldom been equalled in Will county. Many times he has been a delegate to 
state conventions and he is well known to party leaders throughout Illinois. 

In 1908 Mr. Wellnitz was united in marriage to Miss Josephine Stephens 
and to them was born a daughter, Marian Rita, who is now a student in the 
School of Speech of Northwestern University at Evanston. Mr. Wellnitz 
belongs to the Catholic Church ami is a member of several fraternal orders. 
His interest, however, centers upon his profession ami the offices which he has 
filled have been in direct line therewith. In his practice he has always been 
actuated by a laudable ambition that has made him a thorough student and 
has brought to him substantial success in his chosen life work. 

WILLIAM A. MORRISSEY 

Among La Salle county's supporters of democracy is numbered William 
A. Morrissey, of Utica, where he is a well known business man, engaged in the 
oil and gas trade. La Salle county numbers him among her native sons, his 
birth having occurred in Farm Ridge township, August 11, 1872, his parents 
being William and Mary (Barrett) Morrissey, both of whom are now deceased. 
The father always voted with the democratic party throughout his entire life 
and never missed an election. 

William A. Morrissey was educated in the public schools of Grundy county 
and became a farmer, following that occupation until thirty-three years of 
age. He then turned his attention to mercantile pursuits, establishing a meat 
market, and for twenty years was engaged in the meat trade in Seneca and in 
Utica. Eight years ago he established a wholesale and retail oil and gas busi- 
ness in Utica and has since carried this on. meeting success by reason of his 
enterprise, diligence and intelligently directed efforts. 



244 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

In 1897 Mr. Morrissey was united iii marriage to Miss [da White, of La 

Salle, Illinois, and to them have been horn six children, namely: Mrs. Mildred 
Thosgate; William, who is engaged in the meat business in L'tiea ; Joseph, 
who is postmaster of Utica ; Mrs. Mabel Cullen; Catherine, a resident of Chi- 
cago; and Margaretta, who died in 1916. Mr. Morrissey and his family attend 
the Catholie Church and he belongs also to the Knights of Columbus. Politically 
he has always been a democrat and has served as precinct committeeman for 
many years. He has also been a trustee of l'tiea for eight years and has made 
an excellent record as a public official. 



WILLIAM .1. MILLKK 



William .J. Miller, now living retired in Belleville, enjoying a rest which 
he has truly earned and richly deserves, was born October 30, 1850, on the Turkey 
Hill farm, which was the first farm settled by a white man in St. Clair county. 
His father, Michael Miller, was a native of France and arrived in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, .July 4, 1827. Both the paternal and maternal grandfathers of 
William -I. Miller were soldiers under Napoleon. The latter was the father of 
Christina Karlstine, who was also born in France and who in the United States 
became the wife of Michael Miller. In fact their marriage was celebrated in 
St. Clair county, where Mr. Miller had entered land and where for many 
years he followed the occupation of farming. 

William J. Miller was reared on the old homestead and attended the district 
schools of St. Clair county, while during vacation periods he early became famil- 
iar with the work of the fields, learning the best methods of tilling the soil and 
cultivating the crops. The farm on which he lived was settled in 1797 and was 
composed of four Revolutionary war claims of one hundred acres each. Mr. 
Miller's father purchased the property in 1848 and it is still in possession of 
the family. The work of the farm did not, however, entirely monopolize the 
attention of William J. Miller, for he had the opportunity of continuing his 
education in the Christian Brothers College of St. Louis and in McKendree 
College at Lebanon, Illinois. Returning to the old home farm, he joined his 
father in its further cultivation and improvement, this business association being 
maintained until the father's death in 1883. 

Seven years before, or in 1876, Mr. Miller was married to Miss Virginia M. 
Terrell, who was reared on a nearby farm. They lived on the old homestead 
until 1917, when Mr. Miller retired from active farm work and they established 
their home in Belleville. While on the farm he had largely engaged in breeding 
live stock and directly imported both horses and cattle, which he owned and used 
for breeding purposes. He had one hundred and fifty acres planted to blue 
grass, which gave him excellent pasturage. He specialized in shorthorn cattle. 
Percheron horses and Berkshire hogs and kept very fine stock. In fact he bred 
stock that found ready sale on the market at high prices. On one occasion 
he was paid five thousand dollars for four Percheron fillies and he owned stallions 
worth up to three thousand dollars each. His father was a very progressive 
farmer and William J. Miller inherited the property in early life, fertilized 
his ground and made it extremely productive. In fact it is one of the finest 
farms in St. Clair county. Mr. Miller is the only living charter member of 
the Turkey Hill Grange, which was established in 1874 and of which his wife, 
who died October 1, 1932, was also a charter member. He was one of the 
organizers of the Belleville Cooperative Grain Elevator Company, of which he 
has since been the president, and he helped organize the Farm Bureau in St. 
Clair county and was on the first Farm Bureau board. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller had three children: William T., Mrs. Cora Simon, 
who has two sons, William J. Simon, who is a graduate of the University of 
Illinois, and Robert M. Simon; and Don, who lost his life in the burning of 
the Turkey Hill Grange Hall on January 28, 1904, on which occasion he was 
starting a fire and the stove exploded. 




WILLIAM J. MILLER 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 247 

In politics Mr. Miller has always been a democrat and he has served as 
president of the Richland Creek Drainage District, which was organized in 
1911. For many years he has served on the drainage commission and is still 
acting in that capacity. It was he who secured the first rural mail route in St. 
Clair county, promoting the project through the circulation of a petition to 
which he gained many signers. He was one of five men appointed by Governor 
Horner and elected chairman of the St. Clair county farm debt adjustment com- 
mittee and is now acting in that capacity. He is greatly interested in the welfare 
and development of city, county and state and his aid and cooperation can always 
be counted upon to further any project for the public good. He is one of those 
men who have been working to have the names of candidates for the board of 
supervisors on the ballot this coming election. 

Mr. Miller has been instrumental in promoting the interests of the Boy 
Scouts and his cooperation can be counted upon to further any project for the 
benefit of the vouth of the community. 



LUKE L. WATSON 



Luke L. Watson, collector of special tax assessments in Peoria, was ap- 
pointed to this position in 1933 by Mayor O'Brien and has rendered efficient 
service since that time. This indicates his adherence to democratic principles 
and his work for the party. 

Mr. Watson was born in Bloomington, Illinois, March 1, 1879, a son of Luke 
and Catherine (Sheehan) Watson. The latter was born in Lexington, Illinois, 
and her family were pioneers of McLean county. Her father, Thomas Sheehan, 
was a Civil war veteran, serving with Illinois troops. Luke Watson, Sr. was 
a native of County Mayo, Ireland, and became well known as a contractor of 
Bloomington. To him and his wife were born ten children, those living being 
as follows: John ; Roland B., who served in the World war; T. Vincent, a prac- 
ticing dentist of Bloomington; Luke L., of this review; and Margaret. 

St. Mary's school of Bloomington accorded Luke L. Watson his educational 
opportunities and when his school days were over he became a salesman for 
the United States Steel Corporation. Later he was associated with his father 
in the contracting business in Bloomington and afterward established a similar 
business in Peoria, becoming a partner in the firm known as the Klein-Watson 
( 'ompany. Here he was actively associated with industrial interests for a num- 
ber of years and built up a business of gratifying proportions. 

In early manhood Mr. Watson was united in marriage to Margery Mary 
Finnan, a daughter of Paul and Margaret (McHale) Finnan, of Bloomington, 
Illinois. Paul Finnan long figured prominently in the public life of his com- 
munity as a supporter of the democratic party, serving as alderman of Bloom- 
ington and also as representative from his district to the state legislature. Mr. 
and Mrs. Watson are the parents of three children: Margaret Mary, the wife of 
Dr. Philip McGrath ; William Robert, a student at the University of Illinois; 
and Eloi, who is attending high school. 

Mr. Watson belongs to the Knights of Columbus, the Rotary Club and the 
Mount Holly Club. Always voting the democratic ticket, he has thus expressed 
his political preference, and an acknowledgement of his party loyalty came to 
him when in May. 1933, Mayor O'Brien appointed him special tax assessment 
collector. 



WILLIAM C. MANNING 
William C. Manning, deputy collector of internal revenue and secretary 
of the democratic county central committee of Peoria county, was born in the 
city of Peoria, March 25, 1905. His parents were Charles H. and Cassie 
(Walmsley) Manning, both representatives of old families of Peoria. The 
father, who has passed away, was well known in democratic circles and occupied 
the position of revenue agent in this city. To him and his wife were bora three 
sons : William ( '., James J. and Edward. 



•-'1- ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

William C. Manning was educated in the Peoria schools and in early man- 
hood served for a number of yeais as a railroad clerk. He was chosen secre- 
tary of the democratic committee of I'eoria county on the 20th of April, 1934, 
and in the same year was appointed deputy collector of internal revenue, lie 
had previously done active political work as secretary of the county committee 
and also as president of the Illinois State Jeffersonians. lie lias worked along 
practical lines that have been productive of good results and is well known in 
democratic circles in central Illinois. He is a member of the Knights of Colum- 
bus and attends St. Mary's Cathedral. 

.Mr. .Manning was united in marriage to Miss Irma De Bold, who was born 
in Peoria, a daughter of William De Bold. They have spent their entire lives 
in this city, where they are now well known ami where they have many friends. 



W. S. BINNS 



W. S. Binns, of Pittsfield, who is appraiser of the drainage, levee and irri- 
gation division of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, has always made 
his home in Pike county, where he was born February 10, 1865. His father, 
Edward F. Binns, was born in Pike county, Illinois, in 1840 and died in 1895. 
He had been a loyal supporter of the democratic party during his active years 
and in 1877 was elected county clerk of Pike county, in which position he served 
for a five years' term, removing to Pittsfield at that time. For nine years he 
filled the office of chairman of the board of supervisors in Pike county, and he 
was chairman of the democratic county central committee during the same period. 
He was then made a member of the democratic state central committee and served 
on the state executive committee, spending most of his time at the headquarters 
of the state committee during the campaign that resulted in the election of Grover 
Cleveland to the presidency and of .John P. Altgeld as governor. He cooperated 
effectively in all plans to win success for his party and became a recognized demo- 
cratic leader in the state. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and also 
belonged to the Christian Church. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Orpha 
Norton, was born in Vermilion county, Illinois. 

Their son, W. S. Binns, attended the public schools of Pike county, Illinois, 
and Callahan College of Des Moines, Iowa. Like his father, he has long been 
prominent in democratic circles and has held various appointive and elective 
positions. He was deputy county clerk of Pike county for twelve years and was 
then elected county clerk, serving from 1906 until 1918. For a decade he was 
democratic precinct committeeman and for thirty years he has acted as a delegate 
to all the state conventions and was chairman of the Pike county delegation 
during the last election. Four times he was a delegate to the supreme court con- 
vention, attending the last convention at Vandalia, where he also acted as dele- 
gation chairman. He held membership in the State Association of County 
Clerks. County Commissioners and County Supervisors for twelve years an 
nine years was its treasurer and a member of its executive committee. He like- 
wise served on its legislative committee for eleven years and when he voluntarily 
retired was unanimously elected a life member, a distinction that has been ac- 
corded to only three people. He was also elected secretary of the Pike county 
hard roads commission and his cooperation can at all times be counted upon to 
further any project that looks to the benefit of the community along progressive 
lines. He was three times manager of Judge Higbee's campaign when Mr. 
Higbee was candidate for the office of circuit judge and on each occasion was 
elected. He managed the campaign in Pike and Calhoun counties for .Justice 
William Farmer, the only time he ever had serious opposition. 

In October, 1933, Mr. Binns was appointed appraiser of the drainage, levee 
and irrigation division of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation — an appoint- 
ment that recognized his faithful and resultant efforts in behalf of party suc- 
cesses. His labors have been equally effective in behalf of other projects for the 
general good. Since 1914 he has been seeretarv and a director of the Louisiana 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 249 

& Pike County Railroad Company, a municipally owned corporation, and he is 
a director of the Missouri-Illinois Bridge Company, which built what is known 
as the Champ Clark Memorial Bridge. 

On the 18th of February, 1885, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Binns 
and Miss May Crisswell, a daughter of James and Hepsie (Reed) Crisswell. 
They became parents of six children : Florence, the wife of L. W. Robinson, of 
Albuquerque, New Mexico ; John C, a resident of Hannibal, Missouri ; C. E., 
living in Richmond, Missouri ; Marjorie, who is the wife of Porter Wheeler, of 
Rock Island, Illinois; George R., a resident of Pittsfield, Illinois; and Virg 
Grimes, who married Berton Clarahan and lives in New York city. Mrs. Binns 
passed away August 24, 1929, and on the 27th of September, 1930, Mr. Binns 
married Mrs. Bess (Long) Dutton. He is a Mason, with membership in the 
lodge and chapter, and faithfully follows the teachings and purposes of the 
craft. He is actuated in all that he does by a spirit of progress and improvement 
and his enterprise has been of a character that has contributed to the public 
welfare as well as to individual success. 



ANDREW E. SHERIDAN 

Andrew E. Sheridan, who is cashier of the Thomson State Bank in Thomson, 
Carroll county, Illinois, has been a very prominent and sincere worker for the 
democratic party in this section for many years, having served on various com- 
mittees most of the time during the last two decades. At this writing he is chair- 
man of the naturalization committee for Carroll county and is in many other ways 
proving a public-spirited citizen. 

Mr. Sheridan was born in Thomson, Illinois, February 12, 1881, and is a son 
of Patrick and Mary (Flannigan) Sheridan, both of whom were born in Ireland. 
Patrick Sheridan, whose birth year was 1839 and who died in 1907, came to the 
United States about 1860. He first located in Scranton, Pennsylvania and ap- 
proximately five years later came to Carroll county, Illinois. With the exception 
of a few years residence in Waterloo, Iowa, he remained here for the rest of his 
life. He was a farmer, and active in local democratic circles. 

Andrew E. Sheridan attended the rural schools of York township and also 
high school in Thomson. As a young man he learned telegraphy and for five years 
was an operator for the Burlington Railroad. Then, for about eight years, he 
conducted a barber shop and general store. In 1918 he entered the employ of the 
Thomson State Bank, and subsequently was appointed to his present responsible 
position as cashier. 

Mr. Sheridan was married April 11, 1910, to Miss Jennie Connell, and to 
them has been born a daughter, Mary J., who is now acting postmaster of Thomson. 
She graduated from the Thomson high school in 1931, then studied for three 
years at the Northern Illinois State Teachers College in DeKalb and was appointed 
postmaster March 19, 1934. The Sheridan family is of the Roman Catholic faith, 
and holds a most enviable social position in Carroll county. Andrew E. Sheridan 
has paid close attention to civic matters and has always given his efforts to help 
the community. He served as village clerk, village treasurer and member of the 
board of trustees of Thomson over a period of many years. He is now serving as 
precinct committeeman, being elected in 1932 and 1934. For several years pre- 
viously he also served as precinct committeeman. He was at one time the party 
nominee for county clerk. 



AMBROSE S. GALVIN 

Ambrose S. (ialvin. now residing a1 325 Firsl street, Crystal Lake, and 
serving as a member of the state police, was born in Harvard, Illinois, March 
25, 1904. His father, Frank (ialvin, is also a native of McHenry county, as is 
the mother, who bore the maiden name of Catherine Sheahan. They still reside 



250 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

in Harvard, and throughout his entire Life Mr. Calvin has been a stanch sup- 
porter of the democrat ic party. 

Ambrose S. Galvin mastered the early branches of learning in the public 
and parochial schools of Harvard and afterward spent two years as a pupil 
in the bigh school of his native city. He lias been an active worker in democratic 
circles since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and on the 10th of 
.March, 1933, he was appointed a member of the highway maintenance police, 
in which capacity he has since served, being regarded as most faithful to the 
dllt ies of his posit ion. 

« >n the Kith of September, lit:::'., Mr. Galvin was united in marriage to 
Prances Marie Walter. They attend the Catholic Church and Mr. Galvin is 
also a member of the Knights of Columbus. They reside at Crystal Lake, where 
they are well known, and Mr. Calvin is a progressive citizen, giving his support 

to all measures which he deems of vital importance to the community. 



RICHARD FULKERSON TAYLOR 

Richard Pulkerson Taylor lias been engaged in the practice of law at Eliza- 
bethtown, the county seat of Hardin county, for more than fifty years. His life 
record also contains an interesting chapter concerning his service as captain 
of Company D of the Ninth Illinois Infantry during the Spanish-American 
war. He is now a master in chancery for Hardin county, is city judge and has 
been a well known figure at the state conventions of the democratic party for 
many years. 

Captain Taylor was born in Pope county, Illinois. May 5, 1855, and is a 
grandson of Aaron and Mary (Lee) Taylor, who were natives of Virginia, the 
latter having been a granddaughter of "Lighthorse Harry" Lee, member of 
the disintinguished Lee family, which he represented as a gallant soldier and 
officer in the war of the Revolution. James Pinkney Taylor, father of Captain 
Taylor, was born in Virginia and became a resident of Golconda, Illinois, when 
twelve years of age. He early taught school and in young manhood he entered 
land from the government and cleared and developed a farm. He was a stalwart 
supporter of Stephen A. Douglas, having great admiration for the "Little 
Giant" and his statesmanship. He served as a sergeant in the Union Army 
during the Civil war and his religious faith was that of the Primitive Baptist 
Church, in which he remained a deacon until his death. 

Richard Fulkerson Ta3'lor was reared on the home farm, received the ad- 
vantages of the public schools, attended college and became a successful teacher. 
He acted as superintendent of the graded schools of Elizabethtown and while 
thus engaged began the study of law. In 1883 he was graduated from the law 
department of Illinois Wesleyan University, his admission to the bar having 
occurred the preceding year. He has since continued in the active general prac- 
tice of his profession in southern Illinois and is one of the veteran and honored 
members of the bar of Hardin county. He served as state's attorney of the 
county through the period from 1892 to 1896 and then gave his attention to 
private practice until June, 1898, when he enlisted for service in the Spanish- 
American war, being commissioned a captain of Company D, Ninth Illinois 
Volunteer infantry. With his command he was in active service in Cuba for 
five months and received his honorable discharge at Augusta, Georgia, after 
which he resumed the practice of law in Elizabethtown, Illinois. In 1914 he was 
elected representative from the forty-eighth district to the state legislature. He 
is now serving as city judge and for several terms has served as master in chan- 
cery. He is a stalwart supporter of the principles of the democratic party, and in 
addition to the offices which he has filled that are more strictly in the line of his 
profession, he has served on the board of education and as mayor of Elizabeth- 
town for several terms. 

In 1884 Captain Taylor was married to Miss Mollie Ledbetter, a daughter 




CAPT. RICHARD F. TAYLOR 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 253 

of the late J. Nelson and Rebecca Ledbetter, who were well known and repre- 
sentative residents of Elizabethtown. Captain and Mrs. Taylor had a daughter 
Rebecca Eunice, who was graduated from the Southern Illinois State Normal 
University at Carbondale and the University of Chicago and for several years 
has been a successful teacher in the schools of Paducah, Kentucky. Their son, 
Richard Fowler Taylor, a graduate of the Southern Illinois State Normal Uni- 
versity at Carbondale, and a graduate of the Princeton, (N. J.) School of 
Aviation, was trained in aviation in Texas at Kelly Field and became a first 
lieutenant in the World war. Following the close of hostilities he remained in 
service, was commissioned a major and placed in command of the Thirty-eighth 
Division, located at Indianapolis, Indiana. He was killed in a plane crash at 
Clinton, Indiana, September 9, 1932. Benjamin Herrin Taylor, the younger 
son, attended high school at Delaware, Ohio, and the Missouri Military Academy 
at Mexico, Missouri, and he is now successfully farming and raising Hereford 
cattle on his ranch. He is chairman of the democratic central committee of 
Hardin county and is making a strong fight for the whole democratic ticket. 
He is also sales tax investigator for his district, which comprises four counties. 
Captain Taylor lost his wife on the 17th of February, 1915. She was a 
highly educated lady, an accomplished musician and was very popular among 
her acquaintances, so that her loss was deeply felt among those who knew her 
as well as by her immediate family. Captain Taylor continues to make his home 
in Elizabethtown, where he is active in Masonic circles, having several times 
represented his lodge in the grand lodge. He is also a past commander of Post 
92 of the United Spanish-American Veterans. Looking back over the past half 
century, it will be seen that his has been a very active, useful and honorable 
life, characterized by devotion to duty in every field in which he has labored 
while his efforts have resulted in benefit to his community along many lines. 



MRS. ANNA E. SULLIVAN 

Mrs. Anna E. Sullivan, whose appointment to the office of postmaster of 
Grand Tower was made on the 15th of December, 1933, was born in Murphys- 
boro, Jackson county, Illinois, December 15, 1889, her parents being Fred and 
Matilda (Schmidt) Munz. The father removed from Murphysboro to Grand 
Tower and became prominent and influential in the community, being elected 
in 1901 to the office of mayor, in which he was continued by re-election for 
three terms. 

Anna E. Munz obtained her education in the schools of Grand Tower and 
in St. Vincent's Academy at Cape Girardeau, Missouri, where she pursued a 
four years' course, being graduated with the class of 1907. On the 17th of 
September, 1908, in Kansas City, Missouri, she became the wife of T. John 
Sullivan and they have a daughter, Mary Ellyn. Mrs. Sullivan attends the 
Catholic Church and she votes with the democratic party, which she has 
supported since receiving te right of franchise. She was appointed to her 
present position as postmaster of Grand Tower on December 15, 1933, and 
is capably administering the office, being prompt and systematic in the discharge 
of all of her duties. She is also well known socially throughout the community 
in which she has made her home since girlhood days. 



DEL TORRI 



Among those who aid in making the public highways safe and who are loyal 
to the public service is numbered Del Torri, who was born in Ladd, Illinois, 
December 11, 1901, and still makes his home here. His parents were Dominie 
and Louisa Torri, both of whom were natives of Italy but came to the Tinted 
States and settled at Ladd about thirty or forty years ago. The father, who was 
a coal miner, is now deceased, but the mother survives and still resides in Ladd. 

In the requirement of an education Del Torri attended the public schools of 
his native town. After his textbooks were put aside he found employment in the 



254 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

glass works and in the mines, spending his time at these labors until the 1st of 
February, I!':!:!, when he became highway patrolman, in which capacity he has 
since served. 

In 1923 Mr. Torri was united in marriage to .Miss .Mary Sabatini, who was 
born and reared in Ladd, Illinois, her parents being Egidio and Rose Sabatini. 
natives of Italy, who settled in Ladd about thirty-five years ago. Mr. Sabatini 
followed coal mining for many years and is still a resident of Ladd, but his wife 
has passed away. Mr and .Mrs. Torri are the parents of two sous, Ralph Daniel 
and Francis Arthur. The family attends St. Benedict's Catholic Church and 
Mr. Torri belongs also to the Holy Name Society. He has always been a democrat 
and has been an active worker in the party organization. His entire life lias 
been passed in this locality, where he has a wide acquaintance and a circle of 
friends that is almost co-extensive therewith. 



A. AUSTIN LEWIS 



On the 5th of December, 1932, A. Austin Lewis, of Granite City, was 
appointed assistant state's attorney under M. Lester (Jeers of Edwardsvillc and 
is now faithfully discharging the duties of the office, for which he is well qualified 
by reason of his broad experience as a member of the bar. Mr. Lewis was born in 
.Madison, Illinois, August 22, 1905, a son of Alfred B. and Ola (Bramhall) Lewis, 
both of whom were natives of .Missouri. The father, who was a railroad employe, 
died September 2, 1932. 

A. Austin Lewis attended the public schools of Madison and of Venice, 
graduating from the high school of the latter city. He next entered Washington 
University of St. Louis, Missouri, where he enrolled for the pre-legal course and 
then took the regular law course, receiving his LL. B. degree in 1928. In November 
of that year he passed the required examination and at once began practice in 
Granite City, Illinois. Here he has since followed his profession, making steady 
progress, and it was a logical step to his appointment to the office of assistant 
state's attorney in December, 19.'?2. He also served as president of the board of 
education of Venice for four years. He was delegate to the democratic state 
conventions of 1932 and 1934 and to the judicial convention at Vandalia which 
led to the nomination of Norman L. -Jones. He was active in the Young Men's 
Democratic Club of Venice, which he aided in organizing, servng as its first chair- 
man, and he took helpful part in advancing the work of that organization 
throughout the 1932 campaign. 

On the 20th of September, 1930, Mr. Lewis was married to Kathleen Wood, 
of Selvin, Indiana. He belongs to the Gamma Eta Gamma, a legal fraternity, 
and for five years he has been the secretary of the Tri-City Bar Association,' while 
he also has membership in the Madison County and Illinois State Bar Asso- 
ciations. Fraternally he is a Mason and an Odd Fellow, and he has membership 
in the First Presbyterian Church of Granite City. His associations and interests 
are such as (jive evidence of his life principles and he is a highly esteemed 
resident of Madison county. 

JAMES REED 

On the 1st of November. 1933, James Reed was assigned to duty in the 
highway laboratory at La Salle and has since acted in this capacity. He had 
previously been appointed economic investigator for the department of mines 
and minerals of the state, his appointment coming in recognition of his personal 
qualities and of his loyalty as a supporter of the democratic party. He Avas 
bom in La Salle on the 11th of November, 1874, and is a son of Mark and 
Margaret Reed. He lias followed in the political footsteps of his father, who 
was always an active supporter of democracy. Both parents are now deceased. 

James Red was educated in the schools of La Salle and after his text- 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 255 

books were put aside he became a coal miner and was advanced to the position 
of foreman, in which responsible capacity he served for sixteen years. He 
afterward worked for sixteen months in the Granville mine and on the 1st of 
June, 1933, was appointed economic investigator for the department of mines 
and minerals, a position for which he was well fitted by reason of his previous 
broad and practical experience in all phases of mine work. It was at his own 
request that on the 1st of November, 1933, he was transferred to the highway 
laboratory in La Salle. He has always been a party worker and for twenty- 
two years he has served as alderman of La Salle — a notable record not only by 
reason of its long continuance but also by reason of the effectiveness of his 
service on behalf of municipal government. He has always been actuated by 
high ideals in relation to the public welfare and he has exercised the preroga- 
tives of his office for the public good. For six or eight years he has been 
precinct committeeman of the second precinct of La Salle. 

Jn 1895 Mr. Reed was married to Miss Mary Daily, who was reared in 
Braidwood, Illinois. Their children are: Mrs. Margaret Rapp, of Princeton, 
Illinois; Mrs. Rose Mary O'Conner, of Ottawa; and Mark, Edward and Dorothy, 
who are at home. The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic Church. 



CHANCY I). I JERRY 



Chancy D. Berry, who is an active supporter of the democratic party but 
not an office holder, as his ambition has directed his activities into other fields, 
now makes his home in Litchfield, where he is engaged in the insurance busi- 
ness. He was born in Taylorville, Christian county, Illinois, June 24, 1877, and 
is a son of John C. and Jennie (Killey) Berry, who were natives of Kentucky 
and Tennessee, respectively. The mother came to Illinois with her parents 
about 1871, the Killey family settling in Greene county, whence they afterward 
removed to Christian comity, where Mr. Killey engaged in farming throughout 
his remaining days. John C. Berry, the father of our subject, settled in Christian 
county in 1866 and there engaged in the occupation of painting until his 
death, which occurred in 1927. For about sixteen years he had survived his 
wife, who died in 1911. Their family numbered six children, the eldest being 
Josephine, who was born in 1871 and is now living in Taylorville, Illinois. 
Myrtle, born in 1874, became the wife of John M. Nelson and passed away after 
their removal to Tampa, Florida, where Mr. Nelson died in 1933, leaving three 
children, John, Helen and Nora. Chancy D., of this review, was the third in 
order of birth in the family of Mr. and Mrs. John C. Berry. The others being 
Frank, a painter of California; Carl, a painter of Springfield, and Gertrude, 
deceased. 

Chancy D. Berry attended the public schools of Taylorville, Illinois, and 
since 1900 has made his home in Litchfield, where he established an insurance 
agency. The business has continually grown in volume and importance, and 
he is well known in this field, his enterprise and determination carrying him 
steadily forward to success. He was married to Miss Stella Pierce, a daughter 
of G. F. and Dora (Ware) Pierce. The father was a lifelong resident of 
Montgomery county and for many years engaged in the live stock business 
but finally retired, enjoying a period of well earned rest until his death in 
1929. To Mr. and Mrs. Pierce were born three sons and five daughters. Essie, 
who passed away in 1925, was the wife of John Rise, a coal miner of Mount 
Olive, Illinois. Grace married Robert Brawley and died about 1926. Earl. 
who married but lost his wife, now makes his home at East St. Louis, where 
he is engaged in the grocery business. Harry married Bessie Gray and they 
have three children: Grace. Mildred and Virginia. Hazel, who is married and 
lives in Texas. Fred has been married twice. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Berry have been born three children. The eldest, Chancy 
F.. married Helen Wilson, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Perry Wilson, and there 
is one child, Rex Kimball. Jennie Dora Berry became the wife of John 



256 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Macrewski who is connected with the Standard Oil Company at Litchfield. 
John V.. the youngest, is a graduate of the high school. The three children 
arc graduates of the Litchfield Community High School. 

Mr. Berry belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and the Loyal 
Order of .Moose and he and his family attend the Christian Science Church. He 
turns to fishing for recreation but finds his greatest pleasure in the companion- 
ship of his wife and children. Politically he is a democral and comes of a family 
that in both the paternal and maternal lines has supported the party through 
several generations. He has held the office of town clerk for aboul ten years 
and for four years was precinct committeeman. He was also a delegate t<> 
the judicial convention in 1933 and he works consistently and effectively to 
promote party successes. 



ALBERT E. ISLEY 



Albert E. Isley, county judge of Jasper county, was elected to the bench in 
1930 and has made a most creditable record through the fair and impartial 
decisions which he has rendered and which have ever been based upon a thorough 
and comprehensive knowledge of the law. Judge Isley was born in Jasper 
county, Illinois, January IS, 1871, and is a son of E. F. and Vandalana (Apple) 
Isley, who were natives of Shelby county, Indiana, and came to Jasper county 
in 1867. The father devoted his attention to farming and school teaching for 
many years and is still living at the advanced age of ninety-five. He has always 
been a stanch democrat, believing firmly in the principles of the party, and for 
several vears he served as supervisor of his township. His wife passed away 
January 24, 1928. 

After attending the rural schools near his home, Albert E. Isley enrolled 
as a student in the Northern Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso, where he 
qualified for the bar, winning his LL. B. degree at his graduation in 1896. He 
has practiced continuously in Jasper county since 1900 with the exception of 
four years which he spent as a trial lawyer in Peoria and Chicago, Illinois, and 
the years from 1926 to 192!* when he was attorney for the Interstate Commerce 
Commission in Washington, D. C. The political offices he filled up to the tine 
when hi' went upon the bench were in the direct path of his profession. In 1904 
he became state's attorney of Jasper county, filling the office until 1908. Tn the 
latter year he was chosen one of the lawmakers of Illinois, being elected to the 
state senate for a four-year term, so that his incumbency in the office continued 
until 1912. During the succeeding two years he was chief assistant to the 
secretary of state. It was also in 1912 that he was the unsuccessful candidate 
for the office of attorney general and later he was tendered the nomination of 
attorney general by the Bull Moose party but declined. He has always been 
very active in democratic politics, working consistently for the success of the 
party, and since 1900 he has attended all of the state, congressional and judicial 
conventions. In 1904 he attended the democratic national convention held in 
St. Louis and he has campaigned for the entire ticket many times throughout 
the state. In 1930 he became the nominee of his party for county judge and 
received the endorsement of the public at the polls. He has since occupied the 
bench and his record places him among the foremost representatives of judicial 
service in his part of the state. He also is president of the Jasper County Na- 
tional Building and Loan Association. 

Tn 1903 Mr. Isley was married to Miss Grace M. Sullender, a native of 
Indiana, and they have become parents of a son and a daughter: Leslie L., who 
is attending the John Marshall Law School of Chicago; and Marilyn, who is a 
student in the University of Illinois at I'rbana. 

Judge Isley belongs to the Masonic fraternity and to the Modern Woodmen 
of America and is keenly interested in the welfare of his community, as shown 
in his connection with the Civic Club anil the Rotarv Club, of which he is the 




ALBEKT E. ISLEY 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 259 

president. He belongs also to the Illinois State and National Bar Associations, 
and his worth as a man, as a citizen and as a representative of the Illinois 
judiciary is widely acknowledged. 



FRANK C. NONNEMAN 

Frank C. Nonneman, foreman of the International Shoe Company of 
Springfield, who cencentrates his attention almost entirely upon business affairs 
and political activity, was born in the capital city July 17, 1894, his parents 
being William and Helen (Thummel) Nonneman. The father's birth occurred 
in the family home at the corner of Seventh and Jackson streets in Springfield, 
and he became a molder. His wife was born in Germany. August Nonneman, 
the paternal grandfather of Frank C. Nonneman, was a close personal friend 
of Abraham Lincoln, who often visited at the Nonneman home, and on the 
occasion of the first birthday anniversary of August Nonneman, Jr., Lincoln 
gave him a penny bearing the date 1863, his natal year, which is still in his 
possession. On the death of August Nonneman-, Jr., this coin will become tin- 
property of his grandnephew, Robert Nonneman, son of our subject. 

During his youthful days Frank C. Nonneman was a pupil in the Saints 
Peter and Paul parochial school of Springfield and when fifteen years of age 
he went to work in the factory of the International Shoe Company. There his 
industry and energy have gained him advancement and step by step he has 
worked his way upward until his promotions have brought him to the impor- 
tant position of foreman. Mr. Nonneman was the first of his family to take a 
very active part in politics and from 1922 until 1928 he served as judge of 
election when there were only sixteen democratic voters in his precinct. He 
occupied the position of precinct committeeman from 1928 until 1934 and he is 
a member of the Roosevelt-Horner Democratic Organization of Sangamon 
county and also of the Jefferson Young Men's Club. 

On the 14th of February, 1917, Mr. Nonneman was married to Miss Agnes 
Murphy, of Pawnee, Illinois, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Murphy, who 
are now residents of Springfield and who are supporters of the democratic party. 
Mr. and Mrs. Nonneman have two children : Robert, sixteen years of age ; and 
Lorraine, nine. The parents are communicants of the Catholic Church, identi- 
fied with the Saints Peter and Paul parish, in which Mr. Nonneman has lived 
throughout his entire life. He is also affiliated with the Knights of Columbus 
of Springfield. He deserves much credit for what he has accomplished in a 
business way and he has no hobbies outside of business and politics. 



CHARLES L. ROWLEY 

Illinois on the whole has been fortunate in the class of men who have 
occupied her public offices, and there are now many gathered under the 
democratic banner who are proving most efficient in the discharge of their 
duties. In this class is numbered Charles L. Rowley, who. with offices in the 
city hall at Kewanee, is filling the position of clerk of the city court. He was 
born in Canton, Illinois, 1850, and is a son of James Bloomfield and Rachel 
(Hamilton) Rowley, who spent the greater part of their lives in Canton, 
settling in that city on removing from New Jersey to Illinois in 1847. The 
father was a carriage finisher and worked at his trade for many years. In 
politics he was an active democrat. 

After acquiring a public school education in Canton, Charles L. Rowley 
began learning the cigar maker's trade, which he followed in his native city 
until October, 1873, when he removed to Kewanee. Here he again engaged in 
cigar manufacturing on his own account for a time but subsequently established 
a restaurant. Later he conducted a hotel and for a time engaged in bookkeeping. 
For a quarter of a century, however, he has been clerk of the city court and 
remains as the present efficient incumbent of the office. In spite of his years, 



260 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

for he has now reached the age of eighty-four, lie writes an excellent hand. 
For thirteen years he was with the Western Tube Company and the National 
Tube Company at Kewanee and for eighl years of that period was head time- 
keeper. For two years he wrote cheeks when the companies were paying by 
check. For a considerable time lie was casualty manager, looking alter safety 
devices and accidents when they occurred. His record as a business man and 
official has ever been characterized by thorough understanding of and loyalty 
to duty. No trust reposed in him has ever been betrayed in the slightest degree 
and all who know him commend him for his faithfulness and speak of him in 
terms of high regard. 

In 1873 Mr. Rowley was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Ann Cooke, who 
had been reared in his own neighborhood, and they became the parents of 

seven children, m ly: ( '. ('.. Fred, Mabel, one who died at birth. Harry, Belle 

and Vinton. The wile and mother passed away on the 18th of April. ID'J'J. 
Mr. Rowley married Miss .Jennie Farber, of (leneseo. Having lost his second 
wife, he was married on the 9th of August, 1932, to Mrs. Lonisa Moore, who 
died in September, 1934. 

.Mi-. Rowley has always been an active democrat and has served on various 
party committees. He has likewise filled the offices of city treasurer and town 
clerk and his official record in those connections, as well as clerk of the city 
court, is one over which there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil. 
A Baptist in religious belief, he has been made a life deacon in the First 
Baptist Church of Kewanee and does everything in his power to promote the 
growth of the church and extend its influence as a factor in the moral upbuild- 
ing of this section. In April, 1875, he joined the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows in Kewanee and is still a member of the local lodge, in which he has 
passed through all of the chairs, having to Ins credit the notable record of 
serving for thirty-two years as financial secretary, a position which he still 
tills. He is also a member of Canton No. 54 and Encampment No. 105, higher 
degrees of the Odd Fellows, and a charter member of the Kewanee Lodge of 
Rebeccas. For thirty years he has been an Elk and bis characteristic loyalty 
is manifest in his fraternal relations. His record is one which should inspire 
and encourage others, indicating the worth of upright character and of 
fidelity to duty. 

.MARTIN J. SEELEY 

With the attainment of his majority Martin J. Seeley enrolled under the 
democratic banner and has since followed the party leadership. He makes his 
home not far from Joliet, in which city he has served as bridge operator for 
the state since May 1. 1933. Born in Ireland on the 10th of November. 1887, he 
is a son of John and Ann Seeley, who were also natives of the Emerald isle, 
whence they came to America when their son Martin was but eight months old. 
Crossing the country, they arrived in Joliet and here established their home. 
The father became a supporter of the democratic party after taking out his 
naturalization papers. 

Martin J. Seeley attended both public and parochial schools id' Joliel and 
when his education was completed he learned the boiler maker's trade, which 
he followed for many years, working his way steadily upward until various 
promotions brought him to the position of assistant foreman. After the factory 
was shut down he did other mechanical work for a time and on the 1st of May, 
1933, he became a bridge operator for the state, being assigned to duty in this 
connection in Joliet. 

( >n the 25th of August, 1909, Mr. Seeley was united in marriage to Miss 
Gertrude Klinghoff, a native of Chicago, Illinois, and to them have been born 
ten children, one of whom, John, is deceased. The surviving members of the 
family are Genevieve May. Russell V.. Anna .May. Martin J.. Jr., Francis, Wil- 
liam. Raymond, James and Donald. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 261 

There is an interesting military chapter in the life record of Mr. Seeley, 
who entered the service of the United States on the 28th of May. 1918, as a 
member of the One Hundred and Fifty-first Machine Gun Battalion of the 
Thirty-eighth Division. While in France he was transferred to Company L 
of the One Hundred and Forty-fourth Regiment of the Thirty-sixth Division 
and thus served until he received his honorable discharge June 12. 1919. 
Naturally he is a member of the American Legion and also belongs to the 
Veterans of Foreign Wars. He has membership in the Catholic Church and 
politically he has always been an active democrat, earnestly upholding the 
principles of the party since reaching his majority. He served as precinct 
committeeman for four years and was a delegate to the state convention in 
Springfield in 1932. He lias also been a delegate to various judicial conven- 
tions and his loyalty to the party is unwavering. 



MERRITT B. PALMER 

Merritt B. Palmer, who is now serving as captain of police in Peoria and 
who is the candidate for sheriff of Peoria county on the democratic ticket, was 
born in Geneseo, Illinois, May 1, 1863, a son of J. W. and Emma E. (Parker 
Palmer, who were natives of New Hampshire and Vermont, respectively. Loth 
were descended from old Revolutionary war stock and belonged to old families 
of their respective states. They became pioneer residents of Geneseo, where the 
father was well known as a blacksmith. Their family numbered six children, 
three sons and three daughters, of whom one daughter, Mrs. John Degel, now 
resides in Peoria. 

Merritt B. Palmer attended the public schools of Geneseo and learned many 
a valuable lesson while working in printing offices, for he acquired a knowledge 
of the trade in Geneseo, beginning work when a lad of thirteen years. At the 
age of eighteen he came to Peoria, where for many years he was employed on 
the leading newspapers, the Journal and the Star. He has been on the act ve 
list of the American Typographical 1'nion since 1881. In 190.") he joined the 
police force and rose to the rank of lieutenant, but a desire to again work at the 
printer's case led him back to the trade which lie had learned in his youth. In 
!!»•'!:!, however, he accepted a position as captain of the police force. Previously 
he had made the race for sheriff as the nominee of the democratic party and in 
the primaries of 1934 he was a»-ain nominated for the office. 

Mr. Palmer married Miss Carrie Noffziger, a native of Pekin. Illinois. By 
his first wife. Mr. Palmer had four children, as follows: John M., William M. 
Nora and Helen. Mr. Palmer belongs to the Fraternal Order of Eagles. He 
has led a busy and useful life and his record as a business man and as a citizen 
commends him to the confidence and high regard of all who know him. 



FRANK WEINGART 



Frank Weingart, who makes his home in McHenry, is serving as a main- 
tenance patrolman. His entire life has been passed in McHenry county, his 
birth having occurred in the village of McHenry, August 15, 1890. lie is a son 
of Simon and Agnes (Miller) Weingart. The father passed away in 1901, but 
the mother is still living. 

Frank Weingart attended the parochial school at Volo, Illinois, and after- 
ward secured employment as a farm hand, working for some time in connection 
with agricultural interests. Later he took up cement work and in 1912 removed 
to McHenry, where he has since made his home. No one has ever had reason to 
question his political position, for he has given unfaltering support to the demo- 
cratic party since old enough to vote. He believes thoroughly in its principles and 
is always loyal to its ticket. < >n the 15th of February. \'X\:\. he was appointed 
highway maintenance patrolman of Section 138 and has since rendered efficient 
service in this position. 



262 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

<>n the 24th of September, 1913, Mr. Weingarl was united in marriage to 
.Miss Catherine Laures and they arc the parents of three children : Louise, Evelyn 
and Donald. The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic Church and 
Mr. Weingarl belongs t<> the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Order of 
Foresters, his social nature finding expression in his relations with Ins fellow 
members of these societies. 



JOHN HUMPHREY LE CRONE 

As owner and editor of the Olney Times, a live-wire weekly democratic 
newspaper of Richland county, John Humphrey Le (.'rone wields a most sub- 
stantial influence on polities in that section of Illinois. lie is known widely 
as a capable journalist, and is following in the footsteps of his father, who also 
ranked high in the newspaper profession. Mr. Le Crone was born in Effingham 
county, Illinois, October 6, 1896, and is a son of George M. and Prances ( Nitcher) 
he ( 'rone. 

George M. Le ('rone was a native of Effingham county, Illinois, and his 
forebears originally came to the United States from Alsace-Lorraine and were 
early settlers in the county where he was born. He was a school teacher when 
a young man and later studied law and entered the newspaper business in Effing- 
ham as owner and editor of the Effingham Democrat and the Effingham Record, 
one of them a daily and the other a weekly publication. Mr. Le Crone edited 
these papers for over fifty years and Avas a recognized leader in the democratic 
party in his county. For several years lie served as a committeeman ; was elected 
county treasurer for one term, and was in the state legislature also for one 
term. He was a delegate to many state conventions, and also attended all of 
the congressional and judicial conventions. He was particularly active in the 
Bryan campaign of 1896, and attended the democratic national convention of 
that year, where he heard the Commoner's great Cross of Gold speech. In his 
latter years Mr. Le Crone was executive head of the Modern American Insurance 
Company. 

John II. Le Crone received his education in the grade and high schools of 
Effingham, and very early began to learn the printer's trade in his father's 
plant. He worked in this connection until 1917, when he enlisted in the Navy 
after the Fnited States had declared war against Germany. He served under 
the colors until his honorable discharge in May, 1919, at which time he returned 
to Effingham and was again associated with his father until 1922. In that year 
he bought a half interest in the Vandalia Leader of Fayette county, Illinois, and 
remained with this paper until 1927, in which year, desiring the advantage of 
a finishing course in the journalistic profession, he entered the University of 
.Missouri in Columbia, and from that institution received his Bachelor of Journal- 
ism degree in 1928. He then came to Olney, Illinois, and purchased the Olney 
Times, which had been established in 1855 and which always devoted its columns 
To the cause of the democratic party. This paper is published weekly and has an 
excellent circulation of twenty-two hundred. The plant is modern, and the 
make-up of the paper is in harmony with the most modern style. Mr. Le Crone 
has demonstrated marked ability as a newspaperman, and has invariably met 
tin popular taste in the conduct of his publication. A newspaper is almost 
always a potent factor in determining the trend of politics and the Times has 
been a stanch champion of democracy since the date of its establishment, almost 
eight decades ago. 

In 1922 Mr. Le Crone was married to Miss Helen Price of Prescott, Arizona, 
and to them have been born three children, namely: Vernon, Heyward and 
Arlend. 

In line with his newspaper work, Mr. Le Crone is a member of the Illinois 
Press Association and the Democratic Editorial Association of Illinois. He be- 
longs to the Olney Chamber of Commerce and is much interested in the better- 
ment of civic affairs and the promotion of things which will benefit the com- 
munity. 




JOHN H. LE CRONE 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 265 

THOMAS STEPHEN MURRAY 

One of the most active and influential members of the democratic party 
in De Kalb is Thomas Stephen Murray, who makes his home at 304 South Sixth 
street in this city. A native of Chicago, he was born October 14, 1878, a son 
of Patrick 0. and Eliza (Donovan) Murray, the latter a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Donovan of Batavia, Illinois. Patrick 0. Murray was born in 
Ireland and came to the United States in the late '40s, settling at Batavia. 
Kane county, Illinois, whence he removed to De Kalb county in 1861. He 
served in the Civil war as a member of Company C, Eighty-third Ohio Infantry, 
and was with the army from 1861 until 1866. He participated in a number of 
hotly contested battles and was wounded at Vieksburg. 

Thomas S. Murray attended the public schools of De Kalb and started 
out in the business world as a traveling salesman, selling wholesale paper pro- 
ducts for nine years. He has led an active and useful life and is a veteran of 
two wars. When the United States entered into war with Spain he joined 
the Third Illinois Volunteer Infantry and participated in the Porto Rican 
expedition. It was in April, 1898, at Rochelle, Illinois, that he enrolled as a 
member of Company M and was sent to Camp Tanner in Springfield. From 
the 24th of April until the 15th of July he was at Chickamauga Park, Georgia, 
and thence went to Newport News, Virginia, to embark on the steamship 
St. Louis. He landed at Arroyo, Porto Rico, on the 2d of August and was on 
that island until November 2, participating in the engagements at Guayania 
and Arroa, and was continually on outpost duty. On the return he landed 
at Weehawken, New Jersey, November 7, 1898, and was mustered out of the 
United States Army in January, 1899. In the same month he was commissioned 
a first lieutenant of Company A of the Third Illinois National Guard and 
served with that rank for four years or until 1903, when he was commissioned 
captain of the company, his commission expiring in 1906, when he retired from 
military service. At the time he received his second commission he was the 
youngest captain in the service in Illinois. 

On the 4th of July, 1917, Mi'. Murray was appointed by Governor Lowden 
a member of the exemption board of De Kalb county and so served until 
August, when he resigned to attend the Second Officers Training Camp at 
Fort Sheridan. On the 27th of November, 1917, he was commissioned captain 
of infantry and was ordered to France for duty, embarking at Jersey City, 
December 21, 1917, on the Steamship Lapland, whence he disembarked at 
Liverpool, England, on the 30th. On the 3d of January, 1918, he left South- 
ampton, England, for Le Havre, France, and from there proceeded to Langres. 
where he was assigned to the army line school, completing a course in three 
months. He then joined the Seventy-seventh Division and went to Vimy Ridge 
on the British sector. After serving ten days he was placed in charge of a 
detachment of special instructors whose duty it was to train incoming troops 
for active service. He was next transferred to the Thirtieth Division and 
while with that command was ordered to Ypres, Belgium, as captain of 
infantry. He served for three months in the trenches in that sector and was 
then ordered back to France, arriving at Amiens in September. He was 
there appointed Second Army Corps liaison officer, attached to the Twenty- 
seventh Division, from September, 1918, until October. During an emergency 
lie was placed in temporary command of Company M, One Hundred and 
Eighth Infantry, to replace an officer who had been lost in action, and sub- 
sequently was assigned to the Eighteenth Division of the British sector. While 
acting as liaison officer, on the night of October 8th, he was wounded in the 
left shoulder and left hip by a shell and was in a British hospital near London 
from October 8th to December 1st. He then left Liverpool for the United 
States on the Steamship Empress of Britain and landed at New York, De- 
cember 10th. He entered Green Hut Hospital of New York, where he remained 



266 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

for ten days, when he was transferred to Fort Sheridan, where he arrived 
December 23d. There he received treatment in the hospital until May, 1919, 
and on the 21st of -May he was mustered out with the rank of captain. Thus 
he is a veteran of two wars, and in days of peace he has been equally loyal 
in the best interests of the country. 

On the 22d of .June, 1914, at St. Peter, Minnesota, Mr. Murray was united 
in marriage to Julia M. Lindberg, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Lindberg, 

of De Kalb, Illinois. Mr. Murray belongs to the Chamber of Co terce and 

was secretary of the old Commercial Club from 15)13 to 1915. He belongs to 
the Knights of Pythias, of which he is vice chancellor, and he has been a 
trustee of the Modern Woodmen of America. His religious faith is that of the 
Catholic Church, lie has membership with the United Spanish War Veterans 
and has been camp commander of William II. O'Neil Post of De Kalb. He has 
also been county commander of the American Legion and has membership in 
De Kalb Post. No. 65. In politics he has always been an active democrat since 
easting his first presidential vote. He formerly served on the senatorial com- 
mittee and was a candidate for sheriff in 1!)L!(>. receiving more votes than 
were ever given any democratic candidate in De Kalb county up to that time, 
but could not overcome the republican majority. He has been a member of 
the county central committee of De Kalb county for twenty years and was 
made its secretary in April, 1!):54. He attends all the county and district 
conventions and was a delegate to the last state convention. He also belongs to 
the Young Peoples Democratic Club and he works just as intelligently, actively 
and effectively for the party as he did when he defended the rights and interests 
of his country on foreign battlefields. 



ROBERT C. DELANO 



Through six generations Robert C. Delano traces a direct relationship to 
Franklin Delano Roosevelt and has had interesting correspondence with the presi- 
dent on the subject of the family connection. Mr. Delano, making bis home near 
Princeton, Bureau county, is serving as a highway patrolman. He was born in 
Princeton township, January 6, 185)6, a son of Clarence II. and Elizabeth Delano. 
The father came from Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and the mother was reared in 
northern Illinois. They were long residents of Bureau county, where Mrs. Delano 
still makes her home. Her husband was in the grocery business in Princeton for 
,i considerable period and he served for many years on the board of education 
of that city and as a member of the city council, giving active aid to all measures 
which he deemed of benefit to the municipality. 

Robert C. Delano was reared and educated in Princeton, being graduated 
from high school as a member of the class of 15)15. He afterward worked for his 
father in the grocery business until September, 15)17, when he entered the army, 
with which he served for twenty-two months or until June 10, 1915), becoming 
a member of the Three Hundred and Forty-ninth Regiment of the Eighty-eighth 
Division. He was assigned to Headquarters Company and he also played in 
the band. 

On the 1st of February, 15)21. Mr. Delano was united in marriage to Miss 
Opal Grildermaster. They resided in California during the first year of their 
domestic life and then settled on the farm near Princeton, Illinois, on which 
they now make their home. Mr. and Mrs. Delano have a son, Richard F.. and are 
consistent members of St. Matthew's Lutheran Church. 

After his marriage Mr. Delano followed general farming, thus providing for 
the support of his family, and on the 1st of February, 1933, he was appointed 
to the position of highway maintenance patrolman. He has always been active 
and interested in the democratic party and has served on its finance committee 
in his home locality. For five years he has been judge of elections in Precinct 
No. 5. As a school director he has worked for the best interests of education in 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 267 

his district and he co-operates in any plan or project for the general good. He 
is a charter member of Princeton Post of the American Legion and thus main- 
tains pleasant relations with his old army comrades. Practically his entire life 
has been passed in Bureau county, where he has a wide acquaintance, and that his 
record is a commendable one is shown by the fact that many of his stanchest 
friends are those who have known him from his boyhood to the present time. 



PAUL II. VANNIER 



As the publisher of that popular democratic newspaper of Scott county, 
The Bluffs Weekly Times, Paul II. Vannier has established himself as a most 
influential and loyal newspaperman in the ranks of Illinois Democracy. Al- 
though he has been the owner of this publication only a comparatively short time, 
he has manifested outstanding ability along journalistic lines and has enhanced 
the reputation of the newspaper in striking manner. Paid H. Vannier was born 
on a farm near Bluffs, Scott county, Illinois. November 12, 1901, and is ;i son of 
the late George II. Vannier and his wife, Johanna (Hubbert) Vannier, a 
biography of whom is presented upon another page of this volume. 

Paid H. Vannier attended the public schools of Scott county and graduated 
from high school in Bluffs in 1919. For three years following thereafter he 
pursued advanced work at the University of Illinois, following which he went 
to Chicago and there engaged in the advertising business for eight years. In 
September, 1931, he purchased The Bluffs Weekly Times and has since published 
it as a democratic newspaper. The plant is strictly modern in character and Mr. 
Vannier sees to it that the make-up of his paper is up-to-date and appeals to the 
reading public. Attractive features are carried in addition to the full covering 
of the local news, and the circulation has insured an excellent advertising pat- 
ronage. Mr. Vannier is secretary of the Scott County Jeffersonian Club, and 
vitally interested in social and civic affairs of his home community. 

On June 8, 1932, Mr. Vannier was married to Miss Dorothy Orwig, a daughter 
of James and Margaret (Everitt) Orwig, of Prairie City, Illinois. On April 
10, 1934, Mrs. Vannier was nominated for the position of superintendent of 
schools of Scott county, her fitness for this responsible place having become a 
matter of general knowledge. 



JAMES D. CARRIGAN 



As alderman of the seventh ward James D. Carrigan has taken part in di- 
recting the municipal activities of Peoria since 1933 and has been connected with 
the business interests of the city for a number of years as an electrical engineer. 
He was born in Peoria, Illinois, March 15, 1905, a son of John F. and Anna 
(Halligan) Carrigan. The father was a native of Peoria and represented one 
of the old families of the city. The maternal grandfather of James D. Carrigan 
also came to Illinois in pioneer times and served in the Civil war. His wife was 
from Missouri and came from that state to Illinois while this was still a frontier 
region. In the family of John F. and Anna Carrigan were fifteen children, 
ten of whom are living, namely: John L., Joseph K., Stephen A., Bernard B., 
James I)., Lester, Walter B., Raymond A., Ann and Frank. Maurice and 
Francis have passed away, as has Thomas, who served in the World war in 
France, remaining on the front for twenty-one months and was shell shocked. 

James I). Carrigan was educated in St. Patrick's school and in the Spalding 
Institute of Peoria, after which he entered business life and was variously 
employed until he became identified with electrical engineering. He then 
occupied positions as electrical engineer in local industrial plants and he is a 
member of the Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. 

Mr. Carrigan married Dorothy Payne, a native of Peoria, Illinois, and a 
daughter of Louis and Ellen (.McCarthy) Payne. By this union there are two 
children, Fulton James and Mary Joanne. .Mi-. Carrigan has always given his 



268 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

political allegiance to the democratic party and is a member of the Seventh 
Ward Democratic Club and of the Junior Jeffersonians. lie has worked for 
party welfare and success and in 1 S >: i: i was elected to the city council, in which 
he is now serving as representative from the seventh ward. His entire life 
has been passed in IVoria. where he is well and favorably known and where 
he is making an excellent record as a public official. 

MRS. VELMA B. GRAIN 

.Mrs. Velma B. Crain, county superintendent of schools in Pope county 
and a resident of Golconda, was born in this comity, December 19, 1899, a 
daughter of John and Mollie (Hamilton) Benard. At the usual age she entered 
the grammar schools and continued through successive grades to the high school 
of Golconda, while later she pursued the junior college course in the Southern 
Illinois State Normal University at Carbondale, where she graduated in 1920. 

On the 29tb of March, 1924, in Metropolis, Illinois, Velma Benard became 
the wife of John Crain, who is in the railroad tie production and lumber business 
with his father. They have become the parents of a son, John Benard Crain. 
.Mrs. ('rain, with a true sense of the responsibility and obligations of citizenship, 
has closely studied political problems and votes with the democratic party. On 
the party ticket she was elected November 5, 1930, to the office of county superin- 
tendent of schools, with a majority of two hundred and sixty-six in a county 
normally republican by a two thousand majority, and is proving most efficient 
in this connection. She served as president of the Southern Division of the 
Illinois Teachers' Association — an organization composed of the teachers of 
fourteen southern Illinois counties. She has attended all of the county con- 
ventions of the party and does everything in her power to advance the interests 
of democracy. Her religious faith is that of the Methodist Church, in the work 
of which she takes very active and helpful part. She is now superintendent of 
the Sunday school, is a district steward and is sponsor of the Epworth League. 



.joiix j. McCarthy 



John J. McCarthy, chief clerk of the East Moline State Hospital, was born in 
Rock Island, Illinois, in 1887, a son of William and Elizabeth McCarthy. The 
father passed away in 1906, after having served for a number of years as a factory 
foreman. He was always an active democrat, unswerving in Ins loyalty to party 
principles. 

John J. McCarthy was educated in the public schools of Rock Island and 
made his initial step in the business world by entering the employ of Smith 
Brothers, wholesale grocers of Rock Island, with whom he was connected for 
seventeen years. Subsequently he represented a wholesale grocery house of 
Davenport, Iowa, for four years and then established business in the same line on 
Ins own account in Rock Island, conducting the enterprise for three years. On 
the 6th of April, 1933, he became chief clerk in the Watertown State Hospital 
and is now filling the position in a creditable and acceptable manner. 

In 1916 Mr. McCarthy was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Meehan, 
of Rock Island, and they are the parents of six children, namely: Francis, John 
J. Jr., Margaret Mary, Richard, Betty Jo and Barry. The family circle yet re- 
mains unbroken by the hand of death and the parents and children are communi- 
cants of St. Joseph's Catholic Church. Mr. McCarthy was formerly identified 
with the Elks lodge in Rock Island. He has been a lifelong democrat, keenly 
interested in the party and laboring effectively in attaining its victories. For 
twenty-two years he served as county committeeman and for eight years was 
chairman of the city central committee of Rock Island. In 1924, 1928 and 1932 
he was a delegate to the democratic state conventions and on the 17th of April, 
1934, he became chairman of the democratic county central committee, in winch 
connection his powers of organization and wise direction are manifest in ex- 
cellent results. 




MRS. VELMA B. GRAIN 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 271 



JOHN C. SEYSTER 



In 1879 John C. Seyster was admitted to the bar and since 1880 has con- 
tinuously engaged in the practice of law in Oregon, Ogle county. He is ac- 
counted one of the most able attorneys of northern Illinois and his practice 
has been of an important character. Born in this county May 12, 1854, he is 
a son of Michael Seyster, who was born in Washington county, Maryland, in 
1824 and who came to Ogle county, Illinois, in 1838, when a youth of fourteen 
years. He settled on a farm a mile and a half west of Oregon and there de- 
voted his remaining days to agricultural pursuits, being recognized as one of 
the representative farmers of the community. In politics he was always a demo- 
crat, voting with the party until his death in 1911. 

John C. Seyster attended the rural schools and then entered Rock River 
Seminary at Mount Morris, Illinois. Having determined to make the practice 
of law his life work, he pursued a thorough course of study and was admitted 
to the bar in 1879. The following year he opened an office in Oregon, where he 
has now remained for more than a half century. His practice here has steadily 
grown in volume and importance and the ability which he has shown in the 
handling of his cases and in his work as counselor marks him as one of the 
strongest members of the bar of northern Illinois. His preparation of a case 
is always thorough and comprehensive and his presentation of his cause in the 
court is ever clear and convincing. 

On the 15th of December, 1880, Mr. Seyster married Ella Vinacke and they 
are the parents of a son, Thomas, who is a resident of Oregon, Illinois. 

Mr. Seyster has been active as a democratic supporter since old enough 
to vote. He has attended three national conventions of the party in Chicago, 
being present on both occasions when Grover Cleveland was nominated lor 
the presidency and again when Bryan's name was placed at the head of the 
ticket. In 1882 he was elected to the state legislature, serving until 1884. He 
has always manifested keen appreciation of opportunities for service to his 
party and has been one of its stalwart advocates because of his firm belief in 
its principles. Fraternally he is a Mason of high rank, as is indicated in the 
fact that he belongs to the Mystic Shrine. A resident of Oregon for fifty-four 
years, his life record is as an open book which all may read and its salient 
features place him among the well known and highly honored citizens of the 
county. 

JOHN J. ROGERS 

In 1930 John J. Rogers was elected chief supervisor for the city of East 
St. Louis and as such is ex-officio overseer of the poor. This has proven a very 
strenuous task, as the city has thirty-four per cent of its population on the re- 
lief rolls. Mr. Rogers' duties have therefore been very arduous, but he has 
been found equal to the occasion and his labors have awakened general satis- 
faction throughout the community. 

Born on a farm in Jackson county, Illinois, February 9, 1890, Mr. Rogers 
is a son of Matt E. and Mary (Armstrong) Rogers, the former a native of 
Jackson county and the latter of Franklin county, Illinois. Matt E. Rogers 
conducted a drug business and creamery at Campbell Hill, this state, until 
1892, when he removed with his family to East St. Louis. He has always been 
a supporter of democracy. 

John J. Rogers was but two years of age when brought to East St. Louis, 
where he pursued a public school education and then while still a boy obtained 
a position with Swift & Company. He was afterward with Morris & Company 
and subsequently with the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, and his 
entire record has been one of progress as his powers have expanded and he 
has given proof of his capability to handle important interests. Mr. Rogers 
was reared as a democrat and became an active party worker at his majority. 
His entrance into politics as an officeholder came as a result of a peculiarly 



272 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

interesting circumstance. Several years ago he parked his ear on Collinsville 

avenue, and while he was in a store a policeman placed thereon a ticket. Mr. 
Rogers went to see a friend in the city hall to have this fixed, and his friend 
thereupon agreed to accommodate him provided that he become a candidate 
for the ot'liee (if supervisor. Without special effort on his pari he was elected 
to the ot'liee and has since served in that position with the exception of a two- 
year period. In 1930 he was elected chief supervisor and is now acting in thai 
capacity in a most creditable manner, lie faithfully performs all of the duties 
and meets all of the responsibilities of the ot'liee, and his work in connection 
with relief of the unemployed has been most extensive owing to the depression 
that has so largely affected industrial circles. lie has soughl an equitable 
adjustment of relief to the needs of the individual and his labors have pre- 
vented much suffering, so that today he is a popular chief supervisor and one 
whose course has gained for him wide commendation. For several years he 
acted as precinct committeeman and for one term was vice chairman of the 
city central committee. He is in demand as a campaign speaker and through 
his life insurance work he gained a wide acquaintance, among whom he has 
been an influential factor in support of the democratic party. 

In 1910 Mr. Rogers was married to Miss Anna P. Crump, of Columbia. 
Missouri, and they are the parents of two daughters: Virginia, who is in the 
office of the county treasurer; and Ruth Mary, at home. Mr. Rogers is affiliated 
with the Masonic fraternity and is a loyal follower of the teachings and pur- 
poses of the craft, which is based upon a recognition of the brotherhood of man. 



HARRY KLOSTERMAN 

On the 1st of January, 1934, Harry Klosterman of Wheaton was appointed 

highway maintenance patrolman, having previously been connected with this 
branch of the public service in Illinois. He has taken an active part in demo- 
cratic politics since 1930 and is now serving as a member of the county central 
committee of Du Page county. Mr. Klosterman is a native of Florida, his birth 
having occurred in Daytona, January 8, 1881, his parents being Henry and 
Catherine (Lauterbach) Klosterman, who are natives of Brooklyn, New York, 
and Cincinnati, Ohio, respectively. The father, who now makes his home in 
Cincinnati, has been a lifelong democrat. 

Harry Klosterman has devoted thirty-five years of his life to railroad service. 
From 1904 to 1913 he was with the Chicago & North Western Railway as a 
brakeman and conductor and from 1918 to 1932 was with the Chicago, Aurora 
& Elgin Railroad Company as a motorman. His long connection with these 
companies plainly indicates his capability and faithfulness. 

Mr. Klosterman has voted the democratic ticket since attaining his majority 
and lias been active in local politics since 1930. He was appointed precinct 
committeeman in the latter part of 1932 and re-elected in April, 1934. On the 
3d of February, 1933, he was given a position with the highway maintenance 
department and on January 1, 1934, was made highway maintenance patrolman, 
in which connection he has since served. 

Mr. Klosterman and his wife make their home in Wheaton and are members 
of the Lutheran Church. Mr. Klosterman also belongs to the Moose, Knights of 
Pythias and Independent Order of Odd Fellows and faithfully supports the 
principles and purposes of these organizations. 



CASPER II. SMITH 



Casper II. Smith, county recorder of La Salle county, was born in Peru, 
Illinois, August 12, 1885, a son of Gerhart and Gertrude (Klaesser) Smith, 
both of whom were horn in Germany. The father, who w ? as a miner, is now 
deceased, but the mother is still living and makes her home in Peru. 

Casper II. Smith was educate:! through the medium of instruction in the 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 273 

St. Joseph parochial school of Peru, and through correspondence schools, study- 
ing advertising and business management with the Powell School of New York 
city. He then engaged in the insurance business in Peru and in La Salle for a 
time and afterward turned his attention to manufacturing enterprises, manu- 
facturing an accessory for farm silos. He next became sales manager for the 
Starved Rock Oil Company and continued to act in that capacity until 1932, 
when he was elected county recorder for a term of two years by the largest 
majority given any candidate for recorder in La Salle county, so that he is 
the present incumbent in the position. Commending him on his management 
of the office of recorder, the board of supervisors placed special emphasis in 
their report on his efficiency and economy in the position. 

In 1915 Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Mary M. Doyle, of 
Springvalley, Illinois, and they are the parents of three children: Gregory I)., 
a student at St. Bede College of Peru, Illinois; Mary Jeanne, who is ten years of 
age; and Mary Louise. The family attend St. Patrick's Catholic Church in 
La Salle and Mr. Smith belongs to the Knights of Columbus and to the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Twenty years ago he was made 
town chairman of the democratic organization of Peru, has since been an active 
party worker and for several years was a member of the county committee. 
At the present time he is a candidate for congress, nominated out of a field 
of three other contestants, leading by four hundred votes. Whatever he can 
do for the party support he does quickly, willingly and effectively, and in 
his present position as county recorder he is systematic and thorough, making 
an excellent record in the office. 



RICHARD MICHAEL BOYLAX 

The history of Will county would be incomplete without reference to Richard 
Michael Boylan, who has spent his entire life here and has always been a loyal 
supporter of every plan or project for the best interests of the community. 
He now resides in Joliet, but was born in Manhattan township, Will county. 
April 2, 1897, a son of Matthew and Anna (Walsh) Boylan. The father, who 
has now passed away, devoted his active business life to farming and he was 
always a loyal supporter of the democratic party, ever voting for its candidates 
and adhering closely to its principles. 

In the pursuit of his education Richard M. Boylan completed the work of 
the various grades until he had finished the eighth grade but left school at the 
age of twelve years. He was reared to farm life and early gained a practical 
knowledge of the best methods of tilling the soil and culivating the crops. He 
continued to follow farming until 1930. It was on the 18th of October of that 
year that he married Miss Myrtle Schoop, a daughter of Herman Schoop, who 
was an active and prominent democrat of Frankfort township. Will county, 
but always refused to become a candidate for office, giving his support to the 
party because of his belief in its principles and not because of any desire for 
personal gain. Since his marriage Mr. Boylan has lived in Joliet and is now 
filling the position of bridge operator. His work is faithfully performed and 
he has made a good record since appointed to this position. His religious faith 
is that of the Catholic Church and his political belief that of the democratic 
party. He is ever loyal to the organization but has never sought office as ;i 
reward for party fealty. 

RALPH W. LAMOXT 

Ralph W. Lamont, an enterprising business man of Rock Island, w! ce h- : -> 
engaged in dealing in coal and gas, was born in 18.S3, in the city which is still his 
home, a son of George and Sarah (Baker) Lamont, both of whom are now deceased. 
The father was a river steamboat captain and steamboat agent for many years. 
He also operated a boat store in Rock Island for an extended period, selling to 



274 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

the boats their various supplies, and thus for a long time he was a very active and 
enterprising business man of the city. In polities be was an earnest democrat, 
even during the Civil war period, and he served on party committees and in other 
ways rendered active aid to the organization. 

Ralph \V. Laniont was educated in Rock Island and for years has engaged 
in the coal and gas business, his close application, his enterprise and sound 
judgment proving strong features in the attainment of his success. 

Fraternally Mr. Laniont is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and the Loyal Order of Moose. He became interested in politics 
when young and for many years he lias been a precinct committeeman, tak rig 
active part in guiding the destinies of the democratic organization in this district. 
He has been a delegate to many conventions and always a party worker, especially 
active in the field. 



FRANK FISCHER 



Among the enterprising merchants of Hamburg, Calhoun county, is num- 
bered Frank Fischer, who conducts a well appointed general store here and is 
also serving as postmaster. He has a wide acquaintance, among whom he is 
popular, and he is always mentioned as one of the foremost democrats of his 
section of the state. His birth occurred in Hamburg, Illinois, .March 10, 1878, 
his parents being John (J. and Annie .Margaret (Siemer) Fischer. The father 
was born in Hamburg, Germany, in 1839 and made the long voyage across the 
Atlantic to America when a youth of sixteen years, taking up his abode at 
Meppen, Calhoun county, Illinois, lie served in the Union Army during the 
last year of the Civil war and after the close of hostilities removed to Hamburg, 
devoting his remaining days to farming. In politics he was a staunch democrat 
and in religious faith a Catholic, having membership with the Catholic Knights. 
He passed away March 25, 1887, and his wife, who was born in Meppen, Illinois, 
in 1S4S, survived him until December 10, 1920. 

Their son, Frank Fischer, attended the public schools of Hamburg and 
spenl his youthful days largely in the manner of the farm-bred boy who divides 
his time between the work of the schoolroom and of the fields. In young manhood 
he began farming on his own account near Hamburg and so continued until 
1914. During the succeeding two years he engaged in the coopering business, 
devoting his attention to making apple barrels. In 1916 he opened a general 
mercantile Store which for eighteen years he has successfully conducted, his 
enterprising methods and thorough reliability winning for him a substantial 
measure of success as the years have gone by. 

Mr. Fischer is also very active in politics, having for more than a quarter 
of a century taken helpful part in promoting the interests of democracy in 
Calhoun county. He served for two terms as school director of Hamburg. On 
the 27th of November, 1933, he was appointed acting postmaster of the town 
and on May 3, 1934, received his commission. His worth as a citizen is widely 
acknowledged and his cooperation can always be counted upon to further any 
measure for the public good. 

On the 19th of November, 1903, Mr. Fischer was married to Miss Clara 
Roehl and they have four children : Hildagart, who is the wife of Robert Diehl, 
of St. Louis, .Missouri; Ellis, a resident of Hamburg, Illinois; Alberta; and 
Bernadine. Mr. Fischer is a large, fine looking man with snow-white hair and a 
genial countenance, his mild and kindly disposition making him liked by every- 
body, so that his circle of friends is almost co-extensive with the circle of his 
acquaintance. 

WALTER RILEY 

Walter Riley, of Dix, Jefferson county, who is a member of the maintenance 
patrol, was born March 20, 1878, in the county where he still lives, his parents 
being Andrew and Samantha (McMinn) Riley. The father held every minor 




FRANK FISCHER 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 277 

office in Rome township, Jefferson county, serving at different periods as assessor, 
collector, clerk and commissioner. He was keenly interested in everything that 
had to do with the civic welfare and his work as a citizen was highly creditable 
and beneficial. 

Walter Riley attended the public schools until he had completed the work of 
the eighth grade. On attaining his majority he took up farming on his own 
account and for the past twenty years has been engaged in the dairy business. 
In 1929 he purchased and is now conducting a grocery store and feed business 
in Dix and has secured a liberal and well deserved patronage. He is a thoroughly 
reliable as well as progressive business man and whatever success he has gained 
is the direct result of his own labors. 

On the 15th of April, 1904, in Jefferson county, Mr. Riley was united in 
marriage to Miss Alice Cohlmeyer. Mr. and Mrs. Riley are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically a stalwart democrat, Mr. Riley was 
appointed maintenance patrolman in May, 1934. He has attended a number of the 
county and state conventions and he is always interested in the work of the party 
and its organization, co-operating in all measures which he deems of benefit. 
His aid can be counted upon to further any plan for the general good and he 
is regarded as one of the representative residents of Jefferson county. 



CLAUDE EDISON GILLIATT, M. D. 

Dr. Claude Edison Gilliatt. an able and widely known member of the medical 
profession practicing in Allendale, has also been an active worker in democratic 
circles, while the offices which he has held have been in the strict path of his 
profession. At the present writing he is serving as coroner of Wabash county. 

Indiana numbers Dr. Gilliatt among her native sons, his birth having oc- 
curred at Unionville, July '24, 1878. His parents were Dr. William Butler and 
Amy Ann (Lomax) Gilliatt, who were natives of Orange county, Indiana, the 
former a son of William and Nancy (Willard) Gilliatt, natives of West Virginia, 
while Mrs. Amy Ann Gilliatt was a daughter of Lentsford and Elvira (Hunt) 
Lomax. In the acquirement of his education Dr. William Butler Gilliatt attended 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Cincinnati, Ohio, and was graduated 
about 1872. He then located for practice in French Lick, Indiana, but after 
about a year removed to English, Crawford county, that state, and a year later 
opened an office in Unionville, where at the time of his death he was one of the 
oldest physicians in years of continuous practice. He was also very active in 
democratic politics, was ever a liberal contributor to the party and served for 
many terms as a trustee of his town. He passed away February 1, 1921, after 
reaching a venerable age, and his wife died in 1886. 

Claude E. Gilliatt acquired his early education as a public school pupil of 
Unionville, Indiana, continued his studies in the Southern Indiana Normal 
School at Mitchell, that state, and subsequently pursued the pre-medical course 
in Indiana University at Bloomington. He taught school in Orange county. 
Indiana, during the year 1894, later attended the Hospital College of Medicine 
at Louisville, Kentucky, and in June, 1898, graduated. He attended the Post 
Graduate Medical School of Chicago, in 1895, for post graduate work, and the 
Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, in 1921 for post graduate work. Dr. 
Gilliatt began practice in his native city but in 1899 came to Allendale, where 
he has since remained, his practice growing in volume and importance as the 
years have passed. He lias the liberal professional support of his fellow townsmen 
and he enjoys the high respect and confidence of his professional colleagues and 
contemporaries. The Wabash County Medical Society, of which he is a member, 
has honored him with its presidency. He also belongs to the Illinois State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association and at all times keeps in touch 
with the advanced thought and methods of the profession. 

On the 14th of March, 1900, Dr. Gilliatt was married to Miss Beulab Price, 
who was born in Allendale, Illinois. ;i daughter of J. W. and Sarah (McLain) 



27« ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Price. Her Father was the founder of Allendale and was the organizer of tin- 
First National Bank there, of which he continued president until his death. Dr. 
and Mrs. Gilliatl have one son, James Price, who was born February 10, 1901, 
and is now attending the University of Kentucky, where he has received his B. 
s. degree and is now studying for his medical degree. 

In fraternal circles the Doctor is widely known, having membership with 
the .Masons, the Elks, the Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen, lie also 
belongs to the Kiwanis Club and to the .Mount Carmel Country Club. His politi- 
cal allegiance has always been given to the democratic party, of which he is in- 
deed a stanch advocate. He has been head of the board of health and is one of 
three physicians id' Wabash county on medical relief. For eight years he has 
served as coroner of Wabash county, his present term of office extending until 
1936. Through his official connections he has been able to render real service to 
his fellow townsmen and in the professional field he enjoys a well merited 
reputation. 

WILLIAM T. BROPHY 

William T. Brophy, the democratic member of the board of election com- 
missioners of Peoria, is an old-time worker for the democratic cause, though 
young in years. He has consistently supported the democratic party since the 
days of his youth and during the lean years gave faithfully of his time and 
of his means to the cause, contributing thereto when campaign funds were 
not easily obtained by the party. 

William T. Brophy 's life story began in Peoria, May 15, 1901, his parents 
being John M. and Alice (Flanagan) Brophy, both of whom were born in 
this city and were representatives of old pioneer families here. They became 
the parents of eight children : Robert ; Bernard ; William T. ; Hubert, who served 
overseas during the World war; John, deceased; James, who is a student in 
the University of Illinois; Mrs. Michael McGann ; and Madeline. 

William T. Brophy was educated in St. Patrick's parochial school of 
Peoria, in the Spalding Institute anil in the Manual Training high school of this 
city, lie became a practical plumber and followed the trade for a number of 
years. He has given his spare time to the democratic organization work for 
many years and his selection as an election commissioner was a popular one. 
His impartiality and fairness in matters pertaining to elections and enforce- 
ment of the law is well known and his service has been highly satisfactory to 
the general public. He was the organizer and the first president of the Sixth 
Ward Democratic Club of Peoria and has been precinct committeeman for 
twelve years. He believes in thorough organization work and his efforts have 
been far-reaching and of great benefit to the party. 

Fraternally Mr. Brophy is connected with the Knights of Columbus, his 
membership being in Alhambra Council, and along the line of business he has 
taken an active interest in the labor movement and has served on the executive 
board of the Plumbers' Union. 



JOHN J. GRANT, M. D. 

Dr. John J. Grant, a distinguished surgeon of Illinois, is practicing in Free- 
port, in which city he was bom .May '27, 1886, a son of Thomas and Annabellc 
(Burns) Grant. The mother was born in Freeport, February 24, 1854. The 
father, whose birth occurred in Ireland in 1844, came to America in his boyhood 
with his parents, who located in Brownstown, Pennsylvania. About 1854 lie 
removed to Freeport, Illinois, and in 1870 began manufacturing brick here. 
About 1894 he established a coal and wood business and continued in the coal 
trade until his deatli in 1!»2:5. Politically he was a stanch democrat and an earnest 
party worker, and in religious belief was a Catholic. 

John J. Grant attended parochial and public schools of Freeport until 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 27!) 

graduated from high school in 1905. The following year he completed a course 
in the Freeport College of Commerce ami afterward studied for his profession 
in New York University at New York and the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
from which he was graduated with the M. D. degree in 1911. For two and one- 
half years he was an interne in New York City Hospital, engaged in surgical 
work. Returning to Freeport, July 1, 1913, he has since here engaged in the 
practice of surgery most successfully. Dr. Grant ranks high in the field of sur- 
gery. His office rooms. X-ray room, examination rooms and treatment room 
are equal to those of any up-to-date clinic, supplied with the most modern equip- 
ment that medical science has produced. He has a well equipped laboratory and 
is prepared to give a perfect metabolism test. His X-ray is among the latest, 
and he has the fluoroscope and everything necessary. The Doctor may be justly 
proud of his achievements in surgery ami of his equipment for examination, 
diagnosis and treatment. 

On the 27th of June, 1918, Dr. Grant was united in marriage to Miss Marie 
Catherine Schulte ami they are the parents of two daughters, Betty Ann and 
Eileen Mary. Their church is the Catholic and the Doctor also belongs to the 
Knights of Columbus, is a life member of the Elks and is likewise a member of 
the Freeport Country Club. He has always taken a keen and helpful interest in 
civic affairs, votes the democratic ticket and was very active in the campaign of 
1932. He was one of the original advocates of Henry Horner for chief executive 
and took an important and helpful part in supporting his candidacy. It was Dr. 
Grant alone who influenced President Roosevelt to stop in Freeport on his 
western tour in 1932, the President making a rear platform speech to ten thou- 
sand people, following an introduction by Dr. Grant. Never neglectful of the 
duties and obligations of citizenship, politics, however, is a side line with the 
Doctor, surgery being his life work, and he is a member of the Stephenson 
County Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical Society and the American 
Medical Association and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons. 



CARL FREDERICK OSTERMEIER 

Carl Frederick Ostermeier, secretary of the Producers Dairy Company of 
Springfield, is a son of William and Caroline Ostermeier, representatives of one 
of the old families of Sangamon county. The father was a member of the Wood- 
side township school board for thirty years and was widely and favorably known 
throughout his community. He always gave Ins political allegiance to the demo- 
cratic party. It was in South Springfield, Woodside township, that Carl F. 
Ostermeier was born, and he attended the common schools of Sangamon county 
until he had completed the work of the tenth grade, when he entered Brown's 
Business College, in which he continued his studies for two years at different 
periods, he afterward pursued short courses in the University of Illinois and at 
all times he has promoted his knowledge through reading, study and observation, 
thus qualifying for larger responsibilities and duties in life. He devoted his 
attention to farming from the time he attained his majority until about seven 
years ago, when he became active in the Producers Dairy Company as secretary 
and sales manager. He was one of the founders of this company and was made 
secretary two years before becoming active in the promotion of its business. 
Under his guidance the interests of the company have been greatly developed 
and enlarged and by all who know him he is regarded as a strong executive, 
doing everything thoroughly and systematically. lie is keenly interested in live 
stock improvement and is a member of the board of directors of the Dairy Herd 
Improvement Association of Sangamon and Christian counties. 

On the 25th of January, 1928, Mr. Ostermeier was married to Cora Able, 
of Louisville, Kentucky, and they have a daughter, Sarah Jean, six years of age. 

Mr. Ostermeier is a director of the Roosevelt Horner Democratic Organi- 
zation of Sangamon county and has been an effective party worker for a number of 



280 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

years. While living in Woodside township he Oiled the office of collector for 
ten years, being elected in a district thai usually gave a republican vote of five 
against one democratic vote. The fad thai he was chosen for the office indicated 
the persona] regard entertained for him by friends and neighbors and the faith 
which they had in his fidelity and trustworthiness. He belongs to the Jefferson 
Young Men's Club of Sangamon county and to various organizations which have 
to do with the welfare, progress and improvement of community and common- 
wealth. He lias membership in the Triangle Circle Club and is vice president 
of the Cosmopolitan Civic Club. He belongs to and is vice president of the Reliance 
Club, a new organization formed by the business men in Springfield, and he is 
the financial secretary of the Concordia College Improvement Association and a 
member of the Trinity Senior Walther League. He is a member of the Trinity 
Evangelical Lutheran Church of Springfield and his entire life has been guided 
by high principles that have been manifest in his support of all those move- 
ments which make for the civic bettermenl and moral progress of the community. 



AliCII WALL 



Arch Wall, of Xebo. Like county, is deputy receiver for the Griggsville State 
Bank and the Perry State Bank. His birth occurred in the neighboring state 
of Missouri, near Whitesville, Andrew county, .Line 7, 1870. His father, P. M. 
Wall, was born in Kentucky and gave lifelong support to the democratic party. 
He married Pernecia Stockton, whose birth occurred in Andrew county, Missouri. 

It was in that county that Arch Wall pursued his early education as a 
public school pupil and later he attended the ('. W. Robins Business College 
in Sedalia, Missouri. In young manhood he learned telegraphy in the J. D. 
Brown Telegraph Institute at Sedalia and started work along that line as night 
operator for the Chicago & Alton Railroad Company. He remained in the rail- 
road service about nine years and in 189s turned his attention to merchandising 
by opening- a hardware store in Nebo. This he carried on successfully and in 
1910 he broadened the scope of his activities by establishing a Ford agency. 
1 1 is two sons and his son-in-law now conduct the business under the firm name 
of Wall Brothers & Caldwell, while Mr. Wall is giving his attention to banking 
as deputy receiver for the Griggsville State Bank and the Perry State Bank. 
He brought to his present duties valuable experience in this field, for he had 
formerly been president of the Minier State Bank of Xebo for five years. His 
knowledge of the business is serving him in good stead and he is doing much 
to untangle the affairs of the banking institutions with which he is now as- 
sociated. 

In 1891 Mr. Wall married Miss Emma Harpole and they have three chil- 
dren: Lva, the wife of F. W. Caldwell, of Xebo ; Harold, of Pleasant Hill, who 
is a veteran of the World war, having been a sergeant in the aviation service in 
France; and Carl J., of Xebo, who was in the navy during the World war. 
stationed at the Great Lakes. 

Mr. Wall has been allied with the democratic party since attaining man's 
estate. He is a party worker rather than an office seeker and for six years was 
democratic precinct committeeman. He also served as supervisor of Spring 
Creek township for two terms and he gives his aid to every well defined plan 
or project that will promote the legitimate success of his party. He was ap- 
pointed by Governor Horner one of the five members of the farm debt adjusting 
committee of Pike county and was elected secretary when the committee met 
and organized. 



WILLIAM HENRY GRAHAM 

Among the substantial citizens of Henderson county is numbered William 
Henry Graham, now making his home in Gladstone, where he was born May 14, 
1868, his parents being William II. and Nancy (Kemp) Graham, who were 
natives of Pennsylvania and of Illinois, respectively. The father was a farmer 




ARCH WALL 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 283 

of Gladstone township, Henderson county, for many years and always gave 
stanch political support to the democratic party. His son, whose name introduces 
this record, attended the public schools of Gladstone township and for thirty- 
eight years has been well known in business circles as a dealer in sand. He has 
shipped sand to all the surrounding business and industrial centers as far as 
Chicago, but because of general business conditions was forced to discontinue in 
1931. He has led a busy and useful life and his enterprise won for him substantial 
success for a long period. 

In 1893 Mr. Graham was united in marriage to Miss May Pierson and they 
are the parents of six children : Ferrell, Lyle E., Chalmer, Mark, Loren and 
Howard. Mr. Graham makes his home in Gladstone and is widely known through- 
out western Illinois. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity and is a loyal follower 
of the teachings and purposes of the craft. In politics he is a democrat and in 
1932 was elected precinct committeeman of Gladstone township, to which office 
he was re-elected in 1934. On the 22d of November, 1933, he was appointed 
highway maintenance patrolman of Section 411 and is still acting in that capacity, 
making an excellent record by his fidelity to duty and the sound judgement which 
he displays in performing the service entrusted to him. 



OWEN J. KELLY 



Owen J. Kelly, who on the 19th of March, 1934, was appointed by President 
Roosevelt to the office of postmaster of Farmington, was born January 26, 
1899, in the city which is still his home, and is the son of Patrick B. Kelly, who 
is mentioned elsewhere in this work. He acquired his education in the public 
schools of Farmington and then learned the barber's trade under his father, 
with whom he became actively associated in business. For fourteen years lie 
continued his work in the shop, which is thoroughly modern and well equipped 
and which he and his father still own. During this period Owen J. Kelly also 
sold automobiles for a period of five years. He was reared by an active demo- 
cratic father and has always given his support to the party, in the work of which 
he has taken a helpful interest since reaching his majority. Most of the time 
he has preferred to work as a private citizen rather than as an official, but on 
the 26th of June, 1933, he became acting postmaster at Farmington to fill out 
an unexpired term and was appointed to the office for a four years' term on 
the 19th of March, 1934. He thus controls the postal interests of his native 
city and is making an excellent record by the prompt and systematic manner in 
which he discharges his duties. 

In 1924 Mr. Kelly was married to Miss Agnes Jane Wilson, of Farmington, 
and they are widely and favorably known here. Mr. Kelly belongs to the 
Masonic fraternity and loyally follows the teachings of the craft. 



MARY (McFADDEN) REARDON 

Mary (McFadden) Reardon, who is tilling the position of postmaster at 
La Salle, is a native of La Salle county, Illinois, having been born in Oglesby. 
She is a daughter of Daniel and Johanna McFadden, both of whom are now 
deceased. They spent their entire lives in La Salle and Bureau counties, and 
Mr. McFadden was always an active and influential democrat but never aspired 
to office, preferring to concentrate his efforts and attention upon other duties 
and activities. 

His daughter Mary supplemented her early educational training by a 
course of study at the Northern Illinois State Teachers College of DeKalb. 
She then became a teacher at Springvalley and subsequently entered the em- 
ploy of the Graham & Sons banking institution of Chicago, becoming the 
assistant cashier. 

In 1911 Mary McFadden gave her hand in marriage to John Joseph 
Reardon, who is engaged in mercantile business in La Salle. They have become 
parents of three children: Mrs. Mary Otterstrom, of Evanston, Illinois; 



I'M ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

and John and Don, both at home. Mr. Reardon has also been an active leader in 
the democratic party. He is a nephew of former attorney general P. •). Lucey. 
In July, 1934, Mrs. Reardon received a commission as postmaster of La 
Salle, this coming in recognition of her ability and of her loyalty to the demo- 
cratic party, she served on the twelfth district central committee of the 
women's democratic organization from 1930 until 1932 and had previously 
been very active in the women "s work of the party. She never hesitates to 
express her honest convictions and her labors have been effective. She acted 
as a hostess ;it the democrat ic breakfast which was given preceding the National 
Convention in 1932 and she is one of the very few women who have been made 
postmaster id' a post office of the first class. She is a member of the La Salle 
Women's Club and occupies an enviable position in social circles. 



JOSEPHINE HAY 



•Josephine Kay, who is filling the office of county recorder of Vermilion 
county and occupies a suite of rooms in the courthouse in Danville, is a native 
of Springfield, Illinois, her parents being Louis and Emily (Hudson) Colvin. 
Her father was an engineer, employed on the Illinois ( lentral, and the greater pari 
of his life was spent in this state. To him and his wife were born three children: 
William T., who is living in Springfield; Bessie, the wife of Enoch Kight, of 
Rossville ; and Josephine. 

The last named spent her girlhood days under the parental roof and in 
early womanhood gave her hand in marriage to George A. Kay, a representative 
democrat of Kossville. He was born on a farm which his parents occupied and 
cultivated near Kossville, Vermilion county, in 1869. His early education was 
obtained in the country schools and he afterward attended the Kossville high 
school, while later he pursued a course in commercial law at Crawfordsville, 
Indiana, lie next became a law student in the Chicago-Kent College of Law. 
He had to work his way through and did not attend continuously, for at periods 
he had to wait until his finances permitted him to return. However, he was 
admitted to the bar in 1N!>7 and at once took up practice. In his profession he has 
made steady progress and he continued to practice law until elected to the general 
assembly in 1914. He is a representative id' one of the old-line democratic 
families, his father and his grandfather having both supported the party. Mr. 
Kay passed away December 24, 1931. Mrs. Kay had never sought office previous 
to that time but was circled to the position of county recorder. She read law 
in early womanhood and was associated with her husband in his law office, so 
that her experience made an excellent background for her present duties as 
county recorder. She is systematic, thorough and efficient in performing the 
work of the office and has made a splendid record in her present position. 

Airs. Kay has always been very active in church work and holds member- 
ship in the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Rossville. She is also prominent 
in the Eastern Star and has held every office in the chapter, while in 1933 she 
became queen of the White Shrine (Ascha) of Jerusalem. She is likewise a 
leading member of the Danville Business and Professional Women's Club and 
is influential in all the different organizations with which she is associated. 



ALBERT P. AYERSMAN 

Albert P. Ayersman, of Coal City, has been a lifelong democrat and served 
for thirteen years ;is precinct committeeman. He was born west of Bloomington, 
in Tazewell county, Illinois, April 1!), 1861, and is a son of .Jacob ami Julia 
Ayersman, both of whom have passed away. The father was an active demo- 
erat even during the Civil war but was very loyal to the Union and contributed 
liberally to the cause. 

Albert P. Ayersman was educated in the common schools and during his 
early life worked on a farm. He afterward entered the employ of the Gibson 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 285 

Canning Company of Gibson City, Illinois, with which he remained for six years, 
and while there he shipped canned goods to Henry Horner, grandfather of the 
present governor of the state. Subsequently he was connected with the Elgin, 
Joliet & Eastern Railway Company, located at Coal City, entering the transpor- 
tation department in 1889. He remained with the corporation until he was re- 
tired on a pension. He had served as fireman, was promoted to brakeman and 
later was made freight conductor. Then, because of his eyes, he was made a 
switchman at Coal City and occupied the position for a number of years, doing 
his work so close to his home that his children could call to him while he was 
on duty. 

On the 12th of December, 1886, Mr. Ayersman was united in marriage to 
Miss Catherine Sinen and to them have been born nine children, namely : Ray- 
mond, Francis, Robert, Ann, Stephen, Bernard, Celia, Catherine and Albert. 
Raymond, Francis and Albert died in infancy. Robert grew to manhood, married 
Marie Walker, November 11, 11)16, and they had four daughters, Vivian, Dorothy, 
Media and Katherine Jean. Robert died May 23, 1928. Ann married Edward 
Weir and they live in Oak Park, Illinois. Stephen married Gertrude Ryan and 
they have one son, John. Bernard married Zola Thompson and they have two 
children, Bernard and Celia. Celia married John J. Cinotto and they have four 
children, Celia, Robert, Marilyn and Darlene. Catherine married Earl Borrie 
and has one daughter, Patricia. The religious faith of the family is that of the 
Catholic Church and formerly Mr. Ayersman was identified with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He cast his first presidential vote for Grover Cleveland 
in 1884 and he never fails to vote in the democratic primary. For thirty years 
he was precinct committeeman and was chairman of the county central com- 
mittee for two years. He attended the judicial convention in Ottawa and has 
been present at various conventions and democratic gatherings in Springfield, 
making at least twenty trips to the capital city while he was county chairman. 
Pie is recognized as an indefatigable worker in support of democracy and his 
labors have been far-reaching and resultant. The fact that he has retired from 
business gives him leisure to take helpful part in politics and he is always ready 
to give a reason for the faith that is in him. 



CLAUDE E. KNOLES 



Claude E. Knoles, a representative of the highway patrol service of Illinois, 
residing in Athens, Menard county, was born in this county, April 14, 1882, his 
parents being Eli and Emma (Hart) Knoles, both of whom are still living, the 
father having now reached the age of eighty-three years. Both have always 
been supporters of the democratic party. The brother of Eli Knoles, Sam Knoles. 
was state's attorney of Menard county and also represented this district in the 
state legislature, so that the family has been closely connected with the political 
history of this section of Illinois. 

Claude E. Knoles is indebted to the public school system of the county for 
the educational opportunities which equipped him for life's practical and respon- 
sible duties. After his textbooks were put aside he began farming, which lie 
followed in Menard and Sangamon counties with the exception of about eighl 
or nine years which he devoted to working for a furniture company in Los 
Angeles, California, and to working at the carpenter's trade in the vicinity (if 
Athens, Illinois. He has been an active democrat in both Menard and Sangamon 
counties, and recognition of his worth to the party came in his appointment to 
the position of highway maintenance patrolman January 22, 1933, so that he 
has now served in this connection for about two years. 

In 1905 Mr. Knoles was united in marriage to Miss Josie Woodruff and they 
are the parents of a son, Carroll, who is in the United States Navy. Mr. and 
Mrs. Knoles are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and are interested 
in all that pertains to the material, social, political and moral welfare of the 
community. 



286 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

MRS. ANNA B. VAWTER 

Mrs. Anna B. Vawter, who in 1!»:»2 was elected vice chairman of the Marion 
county democratic central committee and who takes helpful interest in furthering 
the work of the party, makes her home in Salem, her native city, where she was 
born November 14, 1872. She is a daughter of Albert and Catherine (Aker) 
Allmon. Her mother, too, was born in Salem in the year 1846, her people having 
come to Illinois from Virginia in 1832. The ancestors of .Mrs. Vawter in the 
paternal line came from Tennessee about the same year, and both the Allmon and 
Aker families took active part in the early and substantial development of 
.Marion county. Albert Allmon was born in Salem in 1841 and became one of 
the early merchants of the city. In politics he was a stanch democrat and was 
called to serve in several public offices, doing active duty as city councilman and 
later as mayor. He was keenly interested in civic affairs and cooperated in any 
movement to advance the upbuilding of his community. He died in 1!)1!) and his 
wife survived him for only a few months. 

Passing through consecutive grades in the pubilc schools until completing 
the high school course, Anna B. Allmon afterward took up the profession of 
teaching, which she followed for four years in the country schools of Marion 
county, while subsequently she taught in other parts of the state until 1895, in 
which year she was married to Charlie Raker of Warsaw, Indiana, who died in 
1916. In 1923 she was married a second time, becoming the wife of John II. 
Vawter, who was born in Salem in 1860, a son of Reuben T. and Eleanor M. 
(Kimball) Vawter. His father, a native of Tennessee, came to Marion county, 
Illinois, in 1850 and established a tailor shop in Salem, where he continued his 
residence until his death in 1862. His wife, who was also born in Tennessee, 
died in 1903. Their son, John H. Vawter, was educated in the schools of Salem 
and in early manhood engaged in the coal business, while subsequently he pave 
his attention to the produce business. In 1901 he established a hardware store, 
which he afterward sold, and he is now concentrating his energies and attention 
upon manufacturing interests. He has always led a life of marked industry 
and is widely and favorably known in this community. The First National 
Bank of Salem numbers him among its directors and he is also a director of the 
Illinois Bond Company and the Reliance Loan Company and president of the 
Marion County Mutual Insurance Company. In politics he has always con- 
sistently supported the democratic party and has been an effective worker in 
its ranks. He served as chairman of the Marion county democratic central com- 
mittee during the Bryan campaign in 1896 and back of his activity was a long- 
time friendship for Mr. Bryan, with whom he had attended the local and country 
schools. For two terms Mr. Vawter was mayor of Salem and wisely and care- 
fully directed municipal interests. Fraternally he is connected with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, and his interest in 
local welfare is shown in his connection with the Chamber of Commerce. By 
a former marriage to Maggie T. Carner he had four daughters: Lillian G., Hattie 
N., Marietta and Irene. 

Like her husband, Mrs. Vawter has long been an earnest worker for demo- 
cratic successes. In fact from early girlhood her interest has centered in politics 
to a considerable extent and in 1896 she, too, was a champion of Bryan. For 
several years she has served as committeewoman and in 1932 was elected vice 
chairman of the Marion county democratic central committee and is also chair- 
man of the Marion County Women's Democratic Club. On various occasions 
she has been sent as delegate to congressional and judicial conventions and 
was a visitor to the democratic national convention in St. Louis. Her aid and 
influence are ever found on the side of reform, progress and improvement. 
During the World war she was very active as chairman of the Marion County 
Council of Defense and had charge of the Red Cross work. She belongs to the 
Marion County Women's Club and for six years was president of the library 
board, with full recognition of the value of this institution as an educative and 
cultural force in the community. 




MRS. ANNA 15. VAWTER 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 289 

COLONEL CENTENNIAL BURNETT 

Colonel Centennial Burnett, who i.s Baldwin's postmaster and a well known 
representative of the democratic party in Randolph county, was born June 2, 
1876, in the county where he still lives, his parents being Andrew and Rhoda 
(Preston) Burnett. He became an eighth grade pupil in the acquirement of his 
education and after his school days he concentrated his efforts and attention upon 
the occupation of farming, which he followed until 1910. In that year he was 
appointed to the position of assistant postmaster of Baldwin and served for 
eighteen months, on the expiration of which period he became a salesman with the 
Wehrheim Mercantile Company of Baldwin, with which lie remained until BUT. 
or for a period of about six years. He next became agent for the Southeastern 
Express Company and held that position until 1928. In 1919 he was appointed 
postmaster by President Woodrow Wilson and served for four years, while at 
the same time he conducted the express agency. In 1927 he engaged in the drug 
business in Baldwin and is still owner and manager of a well appointed pharmacy, 
carrying a carefully selected line of drugs and druggist 's sundries, in which 
connection he has built up a satisfactory trade as the result of his progressive 
methods and earnest efforts to please his patrons. 

On the fttli of .May, 1900, in Baldwin, Illinois, Mr. Burnett was united in 
marriage to Miss Anna Lyons and they are the parents of two children, Hazel N. 
and Helen M. The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian 
( 'liurch, in which Mr. Burnett is serving as an elder, taking an active and helpful 
interest in everything that pertains to the growth of the church. Fraternally 
he is a Mason who loyally follows the teachings of the craft and he is also 
connected with the Modern Woodmen of America. Politically a democrat, he 
has voted with the party since attaining his majority and his faithfulness to 
its interests again led to his appointment to the position of acting postmaster 
on the 1st of September, 1933. He received his commission January 17, 1934, and 
now for the second term is promptly and systematically discharging the duties 
of his political position. 

JOHN D. McPHAIL 

John D. McPhail, state inspector of foods and dairies, with offices at Royal- 
ton, has been a resident of Illinois for years. He is a native of Kentucky, his 
birth having occurred in Simpson county, that state, September 3, 1872, his 
parents being Alexander C. ami •Jemima (Phillips) McPhail. The father served 
for five years as a corporal in the Second Illinois Cavalry of the Union Army dur- 
ing the Civil war. 

The public schools afforded John D. McPhail his educational opportunities 
and at an early age he engaged in farming, which occupation claimed his time 
and attention until 1918. lie afterward followed various pursuits until 1932 
and since that time he has served in public office. In fact lie had occupied 
political positions for some time previously, having been a member of the board 
of supervisors in Franklin county, Illinois, from 1913 until 1918. In 1921 he 
was again elected to the office and served for two years. He acted as deputy 
tax collector over a period of three years and was highway commissioner from 
1904 until 1909. On the 2d of September, 1933, he was appointed as state 
inspector in the division of foods and dairies and is now acting in that capacity. 
lie has attended a number of conventions and has been committeeman in his 
precinct for twelve years — a fact which is indicative of his active connection with 
the party through this entire period. lie lias worked unfalteringly for the best 
interests of democracy and is well informed concerning the vital issues and 
questions of the day. 

( >n the 27th of October. 1891, in Franklin county, Illinois Mr. McPhail was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary Greenwood and they are the parents of nine 
children, namely: Otto, William. Lloyd, Delia, Kmsy, Lester, Roy, Mary and 
Louis. The family attends the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which .Mr. 



290 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

McPhail holds membership, and he is also affiliated with the Masonic fraternity 
and the [ndependenl Order of odd Fellows. Something of ilic nature of his 
recreation is indicated in the fact that he is a member of the Blue Wing Hunting 

Clnl) and his social, genial disposition makes him popular in all the different 
organizations with which he is identified. 



GEORGE RINKENBERGER 

George Rinkenberger, a political leader of Tazewell county who has accep- 
tably filled many local offices, rendering valuable service to his community in these 
connections, is also regarded as one of the representative business men of Washing- 
ton, where he is now extensively engaged in the wholesale automobile supply 
business, having at the time other commercial interests. He is a native of Wash- 
ington, Illinois, and the only child of William and Mary (Stumpf) Rinkenberger, 
who are esteemed pioneer residents of this community. The father founded the 
well known lumber industry in Washington in 1899 and was for many years also 
a successful contractor, having erected many of the earlier buildings of this 
region and adjacent communities. lie has contributed in substantial measure to 
the progress and improvement of Tazewell county, where he still resides and is 
the active manager of The William Rinkenberger Lumber Company. 

George Rinkenberger was educated in the local schools and after his text- 
books were put aside he joined his father in the conduct of various enterprises, 
particularly in the management of the lumber company. In DOS he established 
the Washington Auto Supply Company as a wholesale concern dealing in automo- 
bile supplies. In this he was a pioneer and his foresight and courage have been 
rewarded by the growth of the business to its present proportions. He now has 
a sales force of six men and covers the territory of central Illinois. In business 
affairs he displays sound judgement and unfaltering enterprise that has led to 
substantial results. 

In early manhood Mr. Rinkenberger was united in marriage to Nellie Keil, a 
native of Washington, Illinois. lie is a member of the Masonic fraternity, in 
which he has attained high rank. He is a past master of the local Masonic Lodge 
and member of other Masonic bodies including the local Royal Arch Chapter 
and Council, and Eastern Star, also the Commandery, Consistory and Mohammed 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Peoria, Illinois. He is likewise a member of the 
Odd Fellows. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran Church. In politics 
he has always been a stalwart democrat. He was alderman for two terms and 
for four terms, from 1924 to 1932, was mayor of Washington, also was the demo- 
cratic candidate for congress in 1928. As the city's chief executive he gave to 
it a businesslike and progressive administration that resulted in much benefit 
to the municipality. During his service as mayor a complete new waterworks 
system was installed, including new pumps and tower, also new piping. The 
new city hall was being built under his regime, and also he rebuilt the city public 
park, which is the downtown square. 



(I. II. BOEMER 



G. H. Boemer, a resident of Columbia, now connected with the state retail 
tax department, was born in St. Clair county, Illinois, February 20, 1882, and 
traces his ancestry to Germany, where his grandfather was born. The latter 
established the family in the new world and became secretary of a drug com- 
pany in St. Louis. His son, Fred Boemer, was born in St. Clair county, Illinois, 
and made farming his life work to the age of fifty years, when he left the work 
of the fields and removed to the village of Millstadt, where for twenty-five years 
he filled the office of street commissioner, his death there occurring in September, 
1933, when he had reached the venerable age of eighty-seven years. His wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Katherine Miller, was born near Millstadt, where 
her family were well-to-do farming people. 

G. H. Boemer is a product of the St. Clair county public schools and the 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 291 

high school of Millstadt, and he also supplemented his earlier training by a two 
years' course in a night high school in St. Louis. Starting out in the business world, 
lie spent eleven years with the Fleisehmann Yeast Company, this long connection 
being incontrovertible proof of his fidelity to the interests which he represented. 
He then became agent for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, working 
over a considerable part of Illinois for a period of nine years, at the end of which 
time he was elected county clerk. He served in office for a year and in 1922 re- 
turned to the Metropolitan Life, witli which he was then associated for two years. 
He has always been an active democrat and his party named him for the office 
of county sheriff in 1926, but he was defeated. He was also the unsuccessful 
candidate for county judge in 1930. In the meantime he had entered the com- 
mercial field by opening a restaurant in Columbia, which he still conducts. His 
connection with official service in Illinois is that of investigator or field agent 
in the state department of finance, his duties being in connection with the retail 
occupational tax. Mr. Boemer is an accomplished musician and at various periods 
in his life has been a member of bands and orchestras as cornet player, at one 
time being connected with the Ringling Circus band. 

In 1908 Mr. Boemer was married to Miss Mabel Schartzer, who was born 
in Sangamon county, Illinois. Her grandfather, the Rev. James Schartzer, was 
a personal friend of Abraham Lincoln, and letters which were written to him by 
Lincoln are now in her possession. Her mother's family are prominent in Chris- 
tion county, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Boemer have a daughter, Audrey Anne, ami 
they hold membership in the Evangelical Church. Mr. Boemer has no fraternal 
or club connections outside of politics but was one of the organizers of the Monroe 
County Jeffersonian Club, of which he is a past president, and also belongs to 
the local organization of the Roosevelt-Horner Club, of which he is now president. 
He finds recreation in fishing but obtains his greatest enjoyment from music, in 
which art his talent is well developed. 



JOHN WILLIAM MONTGOMERY, M. D. 

Dr. John William Montgomery, who for more than a third of a century 
has engaged in the active practice of medicine and surgery at Birds, was born 
in Crawford county, Illinois, January 25, 1872, a son of Abner and Marinda 
(Pinkstaff ) Montgomery. The first of the family to settle in Crawford county was 
Andy Montgomery, who was born in Ireland and on coming to the United States 
made his way to Illinois, easting in his lot with the pioneer residents. Andrew 
Pinkstaff, the maternal grandfather of Dr. Montgomery, became a resident of 
Lawrence county, Illinois, in 1«4S. Abner Montgomery, the Doctor's father, 
was born in Crawford county, Illinois, and devoted his life to farming. He was 
a stanch democrat, as were the other members of the family, and the Pinkstaff 
family were likewise loyal in their adherence to democracy. They had been 
slaveholders in Kentucky before settling in Illinois and were related to Jefferson 
Davis. 

John William Montgomery acquired his early education in the country 
schools of his native county and then pursued a preparatory course in the Uni- 
versity of Louisville at Louisville, Kentucky. He next entered the Louisville 
College of Medicine, from which he was graduated in 1892, receiving the M. D. 
degree, and he gained valuable experience through service as an interne in the 
Louisville County Hospital. He then located for practice in Southwest town- 
ship, Crawford county, Illinois, where he remained until 1900, when he estab- 
lished his home in Birds, Lawrence county, this state. Here he has followed his 
profession continuously since and in the intervening period of thirty-four years 
has been accorded a large practice for which he has ever shown a conscientious 
regard, giving his patients from the best of his ability and at all times keeping 
abreast with the latest scientific researches and discoveries that have to do with 
medical practice. The Doctor has also been active in democratic politics since 
attaining his majority and in 1S9N was elected a committeeman of Southwest 



292 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

township, while for three years be served on the democratic central committee of 
Crawford county. Since removing to Lawrence county lie has for the past six- 
teen years been a member of the county central committee here. Since 1897 be 
lias attended all state conventions and also the congressional and judicial con- 
ventions, and he has always been out in support of the entire ticket. lie was 
appointed by Governor Henry Horner as district health superintendent in the 
department of public health, and is now acting in that capacity. 

In 1903 Dr. Montgomery married Miss Laura Gearheart, a daughter of 
Isaac and Rachel (Taylor) Gearheart, whose people came from Kentucky to 
Illinois and were among the pioneer democratic families of this state. Dr. and 
.Mrs. Montgomery are the parents of two sons, the elder being Walter A., who 
is a graduate of the Eastern Illinois State Teachers College at Charleston and is 
now district superintendent with the Western Pipe Line Company at Iraan, 
Texas. The younger son is ("arson G., who is a graduate of the University of 
Illinois and is now employed as foreman of the gauge department of the Western 
Pipe Line Company at Iraan, Texas. Dr. Montgomery is a .Mason, loyally 
following the teachings of the craft, but the major part of his time and attention 
is concentrated upon his professional interests and since 1900 he has efficiently 
served as health officer of Birds. For three terms he was president of the Law- 
rence County Medical Society and he is also a member of the Illinois State Medi- 
cal Society and the American Medical Association. 



HERBERT H. LEDBETTER 

Tlie last few decades have witnessed the introduction and development of 
a new business — that which has to do with the radio. It is into this field that 
Herbert II. Ledbetter has directed his efforts, being now owner of a well equipped 
and appointed radio shop in Elizabethtown, Hardin county. It was in this 
town that he was born June 16, 1906, his parents being Joseph Walker and 
Callie (Hetherington) Ledbetter. He finished his education with a two years' 
course in the high school of his native village and then turned his attention to 
the radio business. He is now equipped to give a valuable radio service and to 
do all kinds of repair work in this line in Elizabethtown and has gained a liberal 
and well merited patronage. He thoroughly understands the radio and its 
possibilities and through his business he has added much to the joy of many a 
household in this locality by bringing homes into direct connection with the 
outside world. 

On the 30th of November. 1928, in Elizabethtown, Illinois, Mr. Ledbetter 
was united in marriage to Miss Lucile Denton and they are the parents of two 
children. Mary Elizabeth and James Walker. Politically Mr. Ledbetter is a 
democrat, having supported the party since attaining his majority. On the 
whole he has never been an office seeker, preferring to concentrate his energies 
and attention upon business affairs, but on the 17th of March, 1933, he was 
appointed to the position of highway patrolman. 



.MICHAEL SHANNON 



.Michael Shannon was born near Blocton, Alabama, August 18, 1895. His 
father, .Michael Shannon, Sr., was also a native of Alabama, his natal year being 
lS(il. He was born near Montevallo, Alabama, but early in his childhood moved to 
Blocton, which is situated in the coal mining district of Alabama. He became 
a coal miner and lived in the south until 1!)2.'?, when he came to Illinois. He 
was a democrat in his political views but not active as an office holder. Some 
of his brothers, however, were quite prominent in local democratic circles in 
Alabama. Mr. Shannon married Addie Prather. who was born in that state and 
is now living with her son, Michael, in Johnston City. Her father, Joseph J. 
Prather, was a Confederate soldier during the Civil war, enlisting from North 
Carolina. As a means of livlihood he followed farming and also became a mason 
contractor. His political views were those of the democratic party. 




HERBERT II. LEDBETTER 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 295 

When a lad of six years, Michael Shannon enrolled as a public school pupil 
in Blocton, Alabama, and mastered the work of the various grades until he be- 
came a high school student. Prom the age of fourteen years lie earned his own 
living by working part-time in the coal mines of Alabama. Much of his life in 
subsequent years has been devoted to similar labor. 

In 1917, following America's entrance into the World war, he joined the 
United States Navy, with which he was on duty until 1920, when lie was honor- 
ably discharged. In the same year, lie came to Illinois and located at Johnston 
City, Williamson county, where he now resides. In 1926, he was elected to the 
board of county supervisors on the democratic ticket, this coming as an acknow- 
ledgement of his faithfulness to the party and his effective work in its behalf. He 
was formerly an alderman of Johnston City. At present he is a member of the 
democratic county central committee of Williamson county. On October 1. 
1933, Mr. Shannon received an appointment from Governor Henry Horner as 
parole agent in the department of public welfare, in which office he is now 
serving. 

Mr. Shannon was reared in the Catholic Church. He is a member of the 
American Legion, the Elks and the United Mine Workers of America and has 
always been active in the affairs of these organizations. 



CATES FAMILY 



The name of the Cates family was of Alpine-Nordic-French-and English 
origin. It started in Normandy, Prance, in the eleventh century — 1066. The 
coat of arms of this family described as Heraldic Argent three cats, on a ground 
of silver are superimposed three black cats in the attitude of walking. (The 
cat is the emblem of liberty and naturally hates to be shut in.) 

The Cates family lias been distinguished according to the symbolism of the 
anciences of Heardly for the courage and the love of freedom of its members, 
who have been noted for their sincerity and determination of purpose. The name 
lias been spelled Cat, Catt, Cate, Cates, the "S" was added while the name was 
passing through its Nordic transition, etymology which means the son of Cate. 
It has been spelled Kat, Katt, Kate, Kates, Katz. A partial history of the Cates 
family of the New England branch is now in the Congressional Library in 
Washington, I). C. Two men, Joe Cates, age seventeen, and John Cates, age 
twenty-three, emigrated from Catesville, England, and landed in Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, in August, 1635, of whom the Doctor is a descendant. The family lived 
in Virginia for several generations. About 1750 some of them emigrated to Hills- 
boro, Orange county. North Carolina, and later two families emigrated west, one 
going to Kentucky, the one the Doctor is descended from going to Tennessee. The 
Doctor's great-grandfather, Thomas Jefferson Cates, and wife, Susan, emigrated 
to Dalilgren, Hamilton county, Illinois, some time between 1820 and 1835 and 
there they died. The Doctor's grandfather, Ephriam E. Cates, was born in 
Tennessee August 16, 1810, and died September 15, 1875, in Berry township, 
Wayne county, Illinois. His wife, Nancy Stroud, was born February 5, 1810, 
two miles east of Morrison, Warren county, Tennessee. The house in which she 
was born was built about one hundred-fifty years ago and is still occupied as a 
residence. She was the daughter of Thomas and Hannah Robertson Stroud, the 
former born March 15. 1778, his wife was born December 11, 1783. Early in 
life they went from one of the Carolinas to Tennessee, secured a large tract of 
land, owned many slaves, and raised fourteen children. All these children and 
their families lived and died in Tennessee except one son who went to Arkansas 
early in life, and never married and died there. The Doctor's grandmother died 
in Wayne county, Illinois, in Arrington, now Berry township, February 21, 
1856. The Doctor's grandparents were married at the old Stroud homestead 
two miles east of Morrison, Tennessee. November 30, 1831. They lived in Tennes 
see till five of their eight children were born, as follows: Benjamine Franklin, 
born August 29, 1832, married Sarah Trwin, December 10, 1850, and died April 



296 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

5, 1882. William M., born September 29, 18.!4, married Harriel Johnson, No- 
vember 1, 1854, died May 14, 1915. He died June 15, 1908. Hannah was born 
June 23, 1836, married William M. Dawson, September 28, 1854, died December 

28, 1891. Marilia Rebekah, born April 12, 1839, married William Harlan, March 
l'7. 1856. He was killed ai the battle of Shiloh. Then she married Peter Jones, 
April •_»(), 1866. she died February 1. 1913, and he died .Inly 4. 1896. Ardenia 
was born April !», 1840, married Martin R. Brown, October 29, 18")!), died August 
3, 1904. The others were born at Dahlgren, Hamilton county, Illinois. Andrew 
Clinton was born March 15, 1842, married November 2, 18.")!), died February 

about the 10th), 1877, married Malissa Lstes, November 2, 1859. Lorenzo E., 
born April 27, l84(i. married Mary Elizabeth Jones, .January 5, 1868, died aboul 
October 7, 1886. He died November 1, 11)24. Winfield Duane Cates, bom De- 
cember 20, 1847, was married to Marinda Artemissia Austin, February 24, 1867, 
by -J. W. Hillard. He died January 14, 1914. She died July 2, 1931. She was 
born April 3, 1850, in Portage county, Ohio. To this union six children were 
born, three died in infancy. Ross Madison Cates was born August 2, 1881, never 
married, died October 20, 1906 in Wayne City, Illinois. He served in the 1'nited 
States army for more than six years, and fought in the Philippine Insurrection. 
Zora May Cates was born May 6, 1875, married Thomas Johnson, -July 1, 1890, 
died March 24, 1913. They had two children. Lewis E. Johnson, born July 1!», 
1891, was assassinated .July 10, 1925, at Atlanta, Georgia, while at his post of 
duty. He was a recruiting' officer of the United States army, buried at Salem, 
Illinois, July 12, 1925, married Ilattie Branson, February 10, 1915. They had 
three children. Mary Malissa Johnson was born .June 22, 18!)4. She was married 
in V. A. Hates, has four children. 

The Doctor's maternal grandparents were Alexander Austin, born in Con- 
necticut, died near Sedgwick, Kansas. He married Malmda Bull, December 25. 
1^45, she died October !>, 1862, in Bourbon, Indiana. They had eight children; 
Melvina was born June 16, 1846, married December 18, 1861, died April 9, 1S75. 
Marinda Artemissia was born April 3, 1850, married February 24, 1867, died 
•July 2, 1931. Her father was a Civil war veteran, was a cooper and fought in the 
battle of Pearidge Arkansas. Thomas Wilbur, born April 24, 1852. married 
July 14, 1887, died March 5, 1926, at Wayne City, Illinois, Valoris A. was born 
November 29, 1856, married July 2, 1888, lives in Philadelphia. Asa was born 
in 1848, died in Topeka, Kansas about 187'!. James born 1857, died at Leesburg, 
Indiana. 1863; Mary born April 1, 1862, died at Louisville, Clay county, Illinois, 
December, 1868; Benjamine Franklin Austin, born about 1873, lives at Valley 
( 'enter. Kansas. 

The Doctor's great-grandfather was Thomas Bull, born April 25, 1801, 
married Hannah Bowman, .June •'!, 1*27. She was born September 2, 1806, died 
November 24. 1847. He died July 16, 1881. They had seven children. 

Malinda born March 12, 1829, married Alexander Austin, December 25, 1845. 
She died October 9, 1862. Eliza born January 30, 1831, married James Garry 
about 1852, died 1872. Samuel born November*16, 1833, died December 22, 1915, 
at Orlando, Florida, buried at Fairfield, Illinois. Lutitia was born April 1, 1836, 
married George Miller, died at Rinard, Illinois. Mary was born February 16, 
1838, married Henry Martin Twadell, died February 15, 1919. Lusetta was 
born August 1, 1840, married James Condron, had one son, Charlie. She died 
June 27. 1868. Ephriam born October 13, 1842, died November 27. 1892. Asa 
Bull was born April 30, 1845, died July 22, 1874. 

Dr. Cates was born Sunday morning on the northwest corner of the northwest 
quarter of the northwest quarter of section 28, town one south, range 6 east of the 
third principal meridian, Wayne county, Illinois. This place is known as the 
Joe Holley corner. He married Mary M. Hillard, September 6, 1893. She was 
the daughter of James W. and Sarah Daugherty Hillard. He was born November 

29, !8L'(i. married Sarah Daugherty, August 22, 1852, died September 14, 1!)11. 
she was born April 24. 1831, died October 16, 1904. To this union ten children 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 297 

were born; George born June 14, 1853, married February 4, 1875, died May 5, 
1928. John born March 18, 1855, married September 18, 1877, still living. 
William, born March 1, 1857, married September 18, 1877, died January 21, 1928. 
James, born November 14, 1858, died January 15, 1929. Thomas, born December 
21. 1860, married August 2:5, 1883, died February 27, 1928. David, born Sep- 
tember 29, 1862, married June 2, 1887, still living. Sarah, born March 21. 1865, 
died July 8, 1877. Sylvester, born March 15, 1867, married June 17, 1888, still 
living. Mary M., born February 28, 1870, married September 6, 1893, still living. 
Hannah J. Hillard, born January 13, 1S74, married September <>. 1893, died 
October 1, 1934. 

Their grandfather was George Bell Ilillard, born March 17, 1774, at New 
Bedford Bay, off the coast of Ireland, coming to America. He was a soldier 
in the War of 1812, fought at the battle of Lundy's Lane. He married Margaret 
S. Foraker, who was born on the 5th day of May, 1803, died December 8, 1876. 
They were married about March, 1824. To this union thirteen children were 
born; George W.. born May 26, 1825, died January 23, 1826; James W.. born 
November 29, 1826, married August 22. 1852, died September 14, 1911; Mary J., 
born April 23, 1828, married George Craig, died March 14, 1874; Margaret A., 
born July 16, 1830, married Windland, died December 3, 1875; Susana. born 
December 22, 1831, married James Gallagher, died January 20, 1872; William 
A. J., born June 22, 1833, died October 18, 1865, buried in St. Louis, Missouri; 
Mary E., born June 5, 1835, married Ambrose Daugherty, died and buried in 
Ohio; Sarah, born October 27, 1836, married Ambrose Jeffries, died January 20, 
1872 ; George H., born November 7. 1838, married Elizabeth Green, July 25, 1858, 
and died October 8, 1912, at Independence, Missouri; David, born May 18, 1842. 
died June 25, 1842; Marie E., born August 20, 1840, married Brock, died August 
15. 1862; Hannah Jane, born July 14, 1843, died February 27, 1851; John, 
born February 23, 1845, died May 6, 1862. at Cairo, Illinois. 

E. M. Gates, M. D., R. P., was raised on a farm doing all kind of farmwork. 
He also made and hauled railroad ties by the hundreds, cut and hauled hundreds 
of saw logs, cutting and hauling cordwood, building rail fences, splitting rails, 
clearing timber land. He attended rural schools, never attending a full term of 
school, where he received his primary education. He not being physically able 
to perform such manly labor for self support he turned his attention to securing 
a better education. He attended Hayward Collegiate Institute at Fairfield, Illi- 
nois, after which he taught ten terms of school. Many of his pupils have climbed 
the hill of fame and were successful in their chosen professions. He finished 
teaching in what is known as "Old Liberty school house", north of Sims, Christ- 
mas week of 1898 and began teaching in the new schoolhouse in Sims, January 1. 
1899. This was his last term of teaching. At this time he was preparing for a 
state life certificate in Illinois. On September 6, 1899, he entered the J. Marion 
Sims Medical School, now the St. Louis University, took a full four years' medi- 
cal course, graduating at the Barnes Medical College, now the Mississippi Valley 
University, in May, 1903, receiving his M. D. degree. He began the practice of 
medicine on June 21, 1903, in Wayne City, Illinois. His ability in the practice of 
his profession has been second to none and he is regarded as one of the mosl 
outstanding physicians in Illinois. He passed the State Board of Pharmacy and 
opened a drug store at Wayne City, Illinois in 1906. He gives his time and 
attention to both pharmacy and the practice of medicine. He is licensed to 
practice medicine in Illinois, Missouri and Texas; also to practice pharmacy in 
Illinois and Texas. He is a member of the Wayne County and the Illinois Medical 
Societies. He keeps abreast of the trend of modern medicine and pharmacy, 
in touch with the latest researches and discoveries in both professions. He lias 
always been an outstanding and untiring exponent of democratic principles; 
becoming an active worker in the ranks of the democrat party before he reached 
his majority. He cast his first presidential vote for Cleveland in 1892. He has 
been identified witli every movement, state wide or otherwise, that has for it-- 
purpose the advancement of democratic principles. He served for many years 



298 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

as precind committeeman, and attended county, stale, congressional, and judicial 
conventions as a delegate. He lias been a member of the Wayne City public 
school board for several years. He is active in all civic affairs, his co-operation 
being a dependable factor in law enforcement and upholding good government. 
Be lias spenl his time, effort, energy, and money for the democratic party and 
its candidates, lie has been an outstanding ardent party worker at all times for 
the success of the democrat ic party and its principles, always outspoken Tor and 
in behalf of the common people. The Cates family is one of the oldest, largest, 
most highly respected families in the United States today, filling many of the 
highest professional callings as doctors, Lawyers, pharmacists, dentists, veteri- 
narians, ministers of the Gospel, all for the betterment of mankind and practically 
all are good progressive Roosevelt democrats. 



FRED E. SITTON 



Fred E. Sitton, a resident of Pittsfield and the present circuit clerk of Pike 
county, is a democrat whose unfaltering support of party principles is never in 
question. He had filled various local offices before being called to his present 
position. Pike county claims him as a native son. He was born July 19, 1887, 
his parents being William R. and Ida E. (Galloway) Sitton. The father, who 
was also a native of Pike county, devoted his life to farming and stock raising 
in Pleasant Hill township. He was actively interested in community affairs 
and always voted the democratic ticket. He served as road commissioner but 
gave the major part of his time and attention to his business activities. Both 
he and his wife held membership in the Christian Church of Pleasant Hill. The 
latter was born in Pike county, Illinois, September 1, 1868. William R. Sitton 
died in 1926. Their family numbered three children : Fred E., Rade V., of 
Pleasant Hill township, who is now serving as school trustee, and Beryl, the 
wife of Bernard Riley, a resident of Slater, Missouri. 

The local schools of Pleasant Hill township afforded Fred E. Sitton his 
early educational opportunities and afterward he attended Brown's Business 
College of Jacksonville in 1906 and 1907. Starting out in the business world 
on his own account, he followed farming in Pleasant Hill township and gave 
his attention to his agricultural pursuits until official duties claimed his time. 
He has always been an active party worker in support of democracy and in 
1909 was elected tax collector of Pleasant Hill township, serving for one year. 
In 1914 he became county supervisor from Pleasant Hill township and occupied 
the position for six terms or twelve years, during two years of which period 
he was chairman of the board. On the 2nd of November, 1926, he was elected 
county treasurer and his incumbency in that office covered four years. In 19.'52 
his party named him as a candidate — this time for the office of circuit clerk, 
and the election that followed led to his induction into that position. He is 
systematic and careful in the discharge of his duties and is again adding to an 
unassailable official record. 

On the 19th of September, 1909, Mr. Sitton wedded Luella Gant, a daughter 
of William C. and Rosella (Windmiller) Gant. Mrs. Sitton is a member of 
the Baptist Church while Mr. Sitton attends the Christian Church of Pittsfield 
Fraternally he is a member of the Knights of Pythias. 



IRWIN KNUDSON 



Irwin Knudson, residing in Newark, where he is filling the office of post- 
master, was born in Kendall county, Illinois, March 4, 1899, a son of Ole and 
Sophia Knudson. The father devoted his time and attention to the occupation 
of farming, which he carried on extensively, owning a large acreage which he 
cultivated in a scientific and profitable manner. He spent his entire life in 
Kendall county and is yet survived by his widow, who still makes her home here. 




FRED E. SITTON 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 301 

Irwin Knudson acquired his education in the rural schools of the county and 
in the Plattville high school. When thus qualified by thorough educational 
preparation for the practical and responsible duties of life he took up farming, 
which lie followed until he was made postmaster of Newark, having been appointed 
to the office on the 22d of May, 1934. 

On the 14th of June, 1934, Mr. Knudson was united in marriage to Miss 
Clara Hjenvick. They hold membership in the Plattville Lutheran Church. .Mr. 
Knudson has always been a democrat and for a number of years has been an 
acknowledged party worker whose labors are of benefit to the organization. He 
lias been very active in the Young Men's Democratic Club of Kendall county. 
He is a second lieutenant of Company E of the Illinois National Guard at Platt- 
ville and has held that rank during the past six years. Kendall county is familiar 
with his record, which has always been a creditable and honorable one, for he 
lias been actuated by high principles and in all matters of citizenship he has dis- 
played a public-spirited devotion to the general good. 



MADELINE E. (BRISCOE) BRANNICK 

Madeline E. (Briscoe) Brannick, who is at the head of the post office at 
Minooka, in Grundy county, was appointed to the position on the 15th of March, 
1934. She has always lived in this county, her birth having occurred on a farm 
three and one-half miles south of Minooka. Her parents were Peter H. and 
Margaret Ann (Burke) Briscoe and the mother is now deceased. The father, 
however, is still living, making his home in Joliet at the age of eighty-two years 
or more. He has ever been an active democrat since old enough to vote and still 
manifests a keen and helpful interest in political affairs. He served as township 
supervisor in Grundy county for sixteen or eighteen years, his long continuance 
in the office being proof of his faithfulness to duty and of the confidence reposed 
in him by his fellow townsmen. 

His daughter Madeline attended the local schools, was also a pupil in a 
convent at Morris for a time and later in the high school at Minooka. On the 6th 
of December, 1920. she became the wife of William Brannick, a farmer, and 
they are the parents of a daughter, Mary Patricia, who is thirteen years of age. 
Mr. Brannick is a son of Ambrose and Mary (Peehan) Brannick. of whom the 
former passed away in 1923, while the mother is still living, making her home 
with Mr. and Mrs. William Brannick. The father was an active democrat, always 
giving unfaltering support to the party ticket. His son William likewise has 
ever supported the party, works earnestly for its success. Mrs. Brannick, too, 
has been an active party worker for a number of years and deserves the recog- 
nition that came to her when she was made acting postmaster of Minooka on the 
15th of March, 1934. She was made precinct committeewoman in 1932 and served 
until the spring of 1934 when she resigned. She has always lived in Grundy 
county, has a wide acquaintance within its borders and has gained many warm 
friends through the sterling traits of her character. 



ANDERSON M. THOMPSON 

In 1933 Anderson M. Thompson was apopinted down-state investigator in 
the department of labor of Illinois and has since filled the position. A native 
of the state, he was born in Marion, Williamson county, May Hi, 1885, a son of 
David L. and Lucinda (Goodall) Thompson. His paternal grandfather was a 
soldier in the Civil war. The father was a stalwart democrat and served as 
precinct committeeman in Marion for many years. 

Anderson M. Thompson attended the public schools of his native city ami 
is numbered among the high school alumni of the class of l!MMi. The following 
year he engaged in mercantile business in Marion and thus continued until 1910, 
when he sold his interests and became a member of the Marion police force, so 
serving until 1917. He then engaged in mining in various capacities and in 
1!)22 was chosen as investigator in the legal department for the United Mine 



302 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Workers, in which position he rendered valuable service for a period of eleven 
3 ears or until February, 1933. 

In Marion, Illinois, Mr. Thompson was united in marriage to Miss Frankie 
L. Crossen and to them have been born five children: Clarence Lester, Estes 
Eugene, Pauline -Jane, Mary Evelyn and Tommy. 

Since casting his firsl vote Mr. Thompson has supported the men and 
measures of the democratic party. He has been a delegate to all state conventions 
for a number of years and attended the national convention in Chicago in P)'!2. 
The following year brought him appointment to the position of down-state in- 
vestigator in the department of labor. His previous experience with the mine 
workers* union well qualified him for the work and he has rendered good account 
of himself in this position. Since 1910 he lias served his precinct as committeeman 
and is one of the earnest and effective workers for the democratic party in 
Williamson county. He belongs to the Roosevelt-Horner Club, is a member of the 
United Mine Workers of America and fraternally is affiliated with the Knights 
of Pythias and the Loyal Order of Moose. 



SAMUEL D. MOORE 



Samuel D. Moore, a resident of Sesser, Franklin county, was horn April 9, 
1882, in the county which is still his home. His father, W. D. Moore, a native 
of Tennessee, was for many years a prosperous farmer of Illinois. W. D. Moore 
was a stalwart democrat in politics but the honors and emoluments of office had 
no attraction for him, his allegiance being given to the party because of a firm 
belief in its principles. He married Nancy McFatrich, wdio was horn in Franklin 
county, this state, and came of a family of farming people who were also adherents 
of the democratic party. Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Moore were parents of five sons, 
and the former belonged to a family that numbered eleven children. 

In his youthful days Samuel D. Moore attended the rural schools of Frank- 
lin county ami since attaining his majority he has at various time been a farmer, 
trader and timber dealer, engaging in one or more of these pursuits at the same 
time. His official activity has covered service as township road commissioner 
and on election days he never fails to cast a ballot in support of democratic men 
and measures. 

In 1902 Mr. Moore married Miss Lizzie Thompson, a native of Perry county. 
Illinois, and a daughter of Albert Thompson, who followed agricultural pursuits 
and was a strong democrat. Mr. and Mrs. Moore had one son, who was born 
in 1904 and died in 1927. Formerly Mr. Moore was identified with the Lions 
Club and with the Modern Woodmen of America. He turns for recreation to 
quail hunting and he owns a number of good bird dogs. 



II. C. BRICE 



II. C. Brice, deputy collector of internal revenue at Alton, was born in this 
city December 11, 1885, of the marriage of James G. and Josie (O'Halloran) 
Brice. The father was born in Ireland and in his boyhood arrived in the new 
world, becoming a resident of Madison county, Illinois. For many years he 
engaged in business as a traveling salesman. His wife was born in Jerseyville, 
this state. 

The public and parochial schools of Alton accorded II. C. Brice his educa- 
tional opportunities up to the time when he entered the Alton high school. After 
his textbooks were put aside he engaged in the grocery business in this city for 
several years and subsequently he became department manager for the Elder 
Manufacturing Company of St. Louis. In due course of time, however, actuated 
by a laudable ambition to carry on business on his own account, he organized 
the Price & Pyan Clothing Company and for sixteen years conducted a well 
appointed store under that name. As a merchant he at all times displayed a 
spirit of marked enterprise and substantial results rewarded his efforts. 

In 1911 Mr. Brice was united in marriage to Miss Mabel De Grand, of Alton, 



ILLINOIS DEMOCEACY 303 

Illinois. Mr. Brice belongs to the Knights of Columbus, the Elks and also to 
Dad's Club, which sponsors playgrounds. His wife is active in the various 
socities of the Old Cathedral, of which they have always been members. Polit- 
ically a democrat, Mr. Brice attends all the local conventions of his party and in 
December, 1932, he was appointed United States deputy collector of revenue 
under V. Y. Dallman. He had previously served for five years on the Alton 
police commission and for two years was chairman under the administrations of 
George T. Davis and Thomas Butler. He served for two years as a member of the 
.Madison county central committee and is active in all party organization work, 
doing everything in his power to further the interests of democracy because of 
a firm belief in the principles of the party as factors in good government. 

JAMES E. CUNNINGHAM 

James E. Cunningham is a resident of Harvard, where he has long been 
engaged in the insurance business. Democracy in McHenry county finds him 
one of its stanch supporters and for fifty years he has been a precinct committee- 
man. Throughout the half-century period he has worked consistently for party 
principles and lias held various local offices, the duties Of which he lias promptly 
and faithfully discharged, Mr. Cunningham was born in Dunham township, Mc- 
Henry county, a son of Florence and Anne (Brady) Cunnigham, both of whom 
were natives of Ireland. The father came to America about 1836 and for eight 
years after his arrival lived on Staten Island, New York. He afterward spent 
about one year in Florida and about 1845 arrived in Illinois, settling in Chicago, 
where he was overseer on the old plank road from Chicago to Jefferson, occupying 
the position for five years. In 1853 he came to McHenry county and engaged in 
farming in Dunham township throughout his remaining days. Politically lie was 
always a stanch democrat, never voting any other ticket. 

•lames E. Cunningham was reared on the home farm, working in the fields 
in the summer ami attending the public schools of Dunham township in the 
winter. In young manhood he taught for four terms in the rural schools. He 
lived on the old home farm for a half century, devoting his time and energies to 
its further cultivation. About 1916 he established his home in Harvard, where 
he has since lived. Mr. Cunningham has never faltered in his allegiance to the 
democratic party since casting his first vote. He served as commissioner of high- 
ways in Dunham township for twenty-seven years and has been a member of the 
drainage commission of the township for the past quarter of a century. He was 
also school trustee for fifteen years while living in Dunham township and he has 
served continuously as precinct committeeman since 1884. Wherever lie could 
lend a hand to further democratic interests he has done so and his work has 
made him an outstanding figure in political circles in his section of th^ state. 

WALTER II. BOLTE 

Walter II. Bolte, a member of the state highway police and a resident of 
Geneseo, was born December 11, 1898, in the city which is still his home, his 
parents being Henry and Mary (Wendt) Bolte. The father was a well known 
merchant, having engaged in the hardware trade in Geneseo for thirty-five years. 
and he always gave his political support to the democratic party. He has passed 
away, but the mother still survives. 

Walter II. Bolte was educated in the schools of Geneseo, being graduated 
from high school witli the class of 1916. He then learned the trades of steam- 
fitting and plumbing, which he followed for some time, after which lie was 
called to public office, serving for two years as a member of the city police force. 
On the 8th of March, 1933, he became a member of the highway maintenance 
police and is still acting in that capacity. 

On the 12th of June, 1923, Mr. Bolte was married to Miss Helen Fritsch, 
of Geneseo, Illinois, and they are the parents of four children: Walter II., Jr., 
Norma Jean, Carol Dorene and Dorothy Josephine. Air. Bolte and his family 
are members of the Lutheran Church. He has always been an active democrat 



304 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

and is now serving as precinel committeeman. Be takes ;i keen interest in civic 
affairs and every project for the welfare and upbuilding of his community re- 
ceives his endorsement and support. 

MRS. MAUDE (SMITH) PPEIFER 

Mrs. Maude (Smith) Pfeifer, of Filson, who is a democratic committee- 
man of Douglas county, was bora in Moultrie county, Illinois. December 2:5, 
1885, her parents being William Henry and Eliza Lavona (Jones) Smith, who 
were Datives of Ohio and came from that state to Illinois soon after the Civil 
war. They settled in Moultrie county, where the father engaged in farming 
and sloek buying, devoting his remaining days to that business. He was a 
stanch democral who never scratched his ticket. He died March 11. 1911, 
having lor seventeen years survived his wife, who passed away in 1894. 

Alter attending the public schools of Douglas county, Maude Smith was 
a student in St. Mary's of the Woods Academy in Indiana and thus completed 
her education. In 1901 she became the wife of Charles W. Pfeifer, who was 
horn in Coles county. Illinois, duly 14. 1880, a son of George M. and Pauline 
(Racer) Pfeifer, who were natives of Germany and came to the United States 
prior to the Civil war, at which time the family home was established in Coles 
county, Illinois. Louis Pfeifer, ;i brother of George M. Pfeifer, served with 
the Illinois Volunteer Infantry during the long struggle between the north 
and the south. George M. Pfeifer followed farming and was a well known 
representative of the agricultural interests of Coles county, where Charles W. 
Pfeifer was reared and educated. Alter attending the public schools the latter 
further pursued his studies in the Eastern Illinois State Teachers College at 
Charleston, and since putting aside his textbooks he has given his attention 
to agricultural pursuits, carefully and systematically cultivating his fields 
according to modern methods. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. To Mr. and Mrs. Pfeifer have been 
born the following named: Erma, the wife of Russell Allen, of Hindsboro, 
Illinois; Pauline, who is connected with the sales tax department in Spring- 
field; Charles W., Jr., a farmer of Coles county, this state; and Smith E., at 
home. One daughter they raised, Helen -Jenkins. 

Mrs. Pfeifer has been an active worker in democratic ranks since 1922 and 
in 1932 was elected a committeeman from Areola Precinct Xo. 4, to which 
office she was re-elected in 19:54. She is very active in getting out the vote on 
election days and always supports the entire party ticket. She has attended 
several judicial, congressional and state conventions, either as a delegate or 
visitor, and was present at the inaugural of Governor Horner. She belongs to 
the Jeffersonian Club and to the Women's Democratic League of County Or- 
ganizations of the State of Illinois. She, too. is identified with Masonry as a 
member of its women's auxiliary, the Eastern Star. She belongs to the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church and was president of its missionary society for ten 
years, while in other branches id' the church work she has also taken helpful 
part. She is a member of the Women's Federated Club of Areola and she is 
assistant superintendent of the culinary department of the State Fair. Her 
activities center in those interests which are of real benefit to a community and 
her labors have been effective in promoting public welfare. 

PALL .J. UPTON 

Paul -I. Upton, a resident of Plainfield, Will county, is now occupying the 
position of inspector of the department of conservation. He was born January 
12, 1902, in the town where he still makes his home, his parents being William 
and Lillian Upton, both of whom are deceased. They, too, were born and reared 
in Will county and the father was an active democrat, being one of only three 
of that political faith in Plainfield township for forty-five years. For many years 
he was engaged in the ice and ice cream business, making this one of the leading 
commercial interests in the community. 




7?l^^^&AyL/ 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 307 

Reared under the parental roof, Paul J. Upton attended the schools of 
Plainfield and after finishing the high school course studied law for two years 
in the office and under the preceptorship of the firm of Brundage & Gorman of 
Chicago. He then decided to abandon his idea of becoming a member of the 
bar and obtained a position as a salesman, being active in that line of business 
until he was made an inspector in the state department of conservation on the 
1st of August, 1934. He is in charge of District No. 2, which comprises Will, 
Kankakee, Kendall, Kane and DuPage counties, his duties being those of game 
warden. His appointment came in recognition of his loyalty to the democratic 
party and his fitness for the office. He has always voted the democratic ticket 
and for four years was precinct committeeman. He served as a delegate at the 
convention which nominated the circuit judges and was a delegate at the state 
conventions in Springfield in 1932 and 1934. In 1930 there were only six demo- 
crats in his precinct but in 1932 two hundred and fifty democratic votes were 
cast in the same precinct. In 1933 a democratic ticket was placed in the field 
in his township for the first time in its history. Its supporters were successful 
and elected Bert McCauley to the township office of supervisor, he being the 
first man ever elected on the democratic ticket to a political position in Plainfield 
township, Will county. Many years ago William Upton, father of Paul J. Upton, 
was alderman in Plainfield, being the first democrat ever elected to office in that 
town. No others were elected in either town or township until Mr. McCauley 
received a majority of the votes. Mr. Upton's precinct went democratic in the 
1932 general election for the first time in its history. This shows that some 
splendid work had been done by the party organizers, who got out the full 
strength of the party and whose effective labors prior to the election were strongly 
manifest. In religious faith Mr. Upton is a Catholic, being a communicant of 
St. Mary's Church in Plainfield, and he is also a member of the Knights of 
Columbus. 



GEORGE F. HIGGINS 

George F. Higgins, an enterprising merchant of Winfield, whose thorough 
reliability has won for him the unqualified confidence of the general public, has 
been numbered among the stalwart advocates of democracy since he was old 
enough to vote and is now serving as public administrator of Du Page county. 
He was born in Winfield, where he still makes his home, his natal day being 
September 27, 1891. His father, Sanders Moses Higgins, was born July 16, 1866. 
in Milton township, Du Page county, where his parents had settled in 1865. 
S. M. Higgins was station agent for the Chicago & North Western Railway for 
about ten years and in 1894 purchased a general store, which he conducted until 
his death, December 2, 1908. He was always a stanch democrat and active in 
local party affairs. For many years he was a member of the Du Page County 
Democratic Organization and he served as postmaster of Winfield for three yeai's, 
1894 to 1897, under appointment of President Cleveland. He was also justice of 
the peace at one time. He belonged to St. John's Catholic Church and also to 
the Catholic Order of Foresters. He was married November 30, 1889 to Barbara 
Berkes, who was born February 13, 1870, and they became the parents of eight 
children: George F., of this review; Henry G., a resident of Glen Ellyn, Illinois, 
and a stalwart supporter of the democratic party ; Richard M., who lives in 
Winfield; Antoinette, the wife of Ernest L. Miller, of Rockford, Illinois; Marie, 
who is the wife of Charles R. McCabe, of Winfield; Cornelia, the wife of Anthony 
Besch, of Winfield; Alice, the wife of Henry Neubauer, of Glen Ellyn, Illinois; 
and Clara, the wife of Adolph Beck, of Glen Ellyn. All of the above named are 
stanch democrats in politics. 

George F. Higgins was reared and educated in Winfield and since attaining 
his majority has been doinjr effective service for the democratic party, working 
earnestly to promote the success of its candidates and secure the adoption of 
its principles. In 1914 he was elected precinct committeeman and lias been 



::o- ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

re-elected every two years since that time. That his Labors have been Ear-reaching 
and resultant is shown in the fact thai his precinct was the only one in the county 
to go democratic in 1932. While he has never been a politician in the sense of 
office seeking, he was appointed public administrator of I)n Page county and is 
now serving in that capacity. As a business man of Winfiehl, he is well known in 
the community, where he is engaged in merchandising and in the coal trade, both 
lines being successfully conducted. 

Mr. tiiggins was married in 1914 to Miss Lena J. Schmidt, and they have a 
family of two children, Laurene and Roger. 



KA11L FLANAGAN 



Karl Flanagan, of Woodlawn, investigator for the Illinois Commerce Com- 
mission, was born .July 20, 1890, in Jefferson county, Illinois, and is a repre- 
sentative in the paternal line of one of the old families of the state. His father, 
Hugh Flanagan, was born in Washington county, Illinois, his people having 
come from Tennessee to this commonwealth in the late '40s. At the time of the 
Civil war he responded to the country's call for aid and joined the Illinois In- 
fantry, while following Ids military experience he carried on farming' in .Jefferson 
county until his death, which occurred March 25, 1924. He stanchly supported 
the democratic party and was active in every campaign for the whole ticket. 
For many years he served on the county central committee and his belief in party 
principles as factors in good government never faltered. He married hi zabeth 
Billingsley, wlio was born in Tennessee but came to Illinois with her parents soon 
after the Civil war, the family settling in Georgetown, now Tamaroa. 

The public school system of Jefferson county accorded Earl Flanagan his 
educational opportunities and when his textbooks were put aside he learned 
telegraphy, which he followed until December 27, 1932, being employed for twenty 
years by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company. His long re- 
tention by this corporation well indicates his fidelity to duty and the efficiency 
which he displayed in the discharge of the tasks assigned him. On the 15th of 
February, 1933, lie was appointed by Governor Henry Horner to the office of 
investigator for the Illinois Commerce Commission, in which capacity he is still 
serving. The party recognizes him as one of its stalwart champions in .Jefferson 
county, where he has served as a member of the county central committee since 
April, 1930. He is also a member of the Jefferson Club and has taken an active 
interest in democratic politics since old enough to vote. In fact he accompanied 
his father on many campaign tours when in his teens and never yet has his interest 
in the political situation lapsed. He works earnestly for the support of the 
whole ticket and believes that in thorough organization the success of the party 
is assured. 

On the 10th of October, 1912, Mr. Flanagan was united in marriage to Miss 
Nellie Blankenship, a daughter of John and Rose (Carter) Blankenship, members 
of a pioneer family of Jefferson county. Like her husband, Mrs. Flanagan has 
been active in the democratic fold since 1922 and belongs to the Jefferson County 
Women's Democratic Club. Mr. and Mrs. Flanagan have three children : Evelyn, 
Lyle and Virginia, who are attending school. Their religious faith is indicated 
by attendance and membership in the Christian Church and Mr. Flanagan is 
a faithful exemplar of the teachings of Masonry, belonging to Ashley Clay Lodge, 
while of the Modern Woodmen of America he is likewise a representative. 



EUGENE L. O'BRIEN 

Eugene L. O'Brien, residing at Crystal Lake, occupies the position of state 
highway engineer of Cook county. Born in Chicago, July 10, 1887, he is a 
son of Daniel and Margaret (Walsh) O'Brien. The father was born in Boston. 
Massachusetts, in 1856 and became manager of real estate interests in Chicago. 
He always gave stanch support to the democratic party. He died in 1891, his 
wife surviving until 1899. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 309 

Eugene L. O'Brien attended St. Vincent's parochial school of Chicago and 
continued his education in De Paul University, from which he was graduated 
with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1905. He afterward took postgraduate work 
in engineering in the same university and thus became thoroughly qualified for 
important work of that character. For the past twenty years he has superintended 
construction work and during the World war he built the wall for the inner 
harbor at Rochester, New York. Prior to that time he built the steam tunnel 
and three underpasses in connection with the new Union Depot at Kansas City, 
Missouri. For the past eight years lie has been engaged in the paving business 
in Chicago. lie is a high type of gentleman, modest almost to a fault, but the 
records bear evidence of his ability in the character of the work that has been 
entrusted to him. 

On the 21st of May, 1913, Mr. O'Brien was united in marriage to Mary 
Lyons and they are the parents of four children, as follows: Eugene L., Jr., 
Margaret, Daniel and Mary. The family has resided in Crystal Lake since 1928. 
Mr. O'Brien has been active in democratic affairs since old enough to vote and 
in 1932 lie was elected precinct committeeman, to which position he was re-elected 
in 1934. On the 1st of October, 1933, he was appointed highway engineer for 
Cook county. lie has attended two national democratic conventions in Chicago 
and gives his cooperation at all times to further party interests. His wife is the 
present committeewoman for her precinct. They attend the Catholic Church 
and Mr. O'Brien is a member of the Knights of Columbus and also of the Elks 
lodge of Woodstock. 



JOE GODDAFvD 



Joe Goddard, supervisor of the highway maintenance patrol, with office in 
Dix, Jefferson county, was born in Flora, Northamptonshire, England, January 
17. 1876, his parents being John and Anna Goddard. The father was a supporter 
of the conservative party in his native England and for a long term held the 
position of crier in his allotment in Flora. 

Joe Goddard obtained his education in the common schools of Flora and 
came to America in 1906, when about thirty years of age. He settled first in St. 
Louis, Missouri, where he found employment as a stable boss with a large livery 
firm. In 1908 he removed to Dix, Illinois, and purchased the farm whereon he 
now resides. The place is carefully cultivated and everything about the farm 
indicates the supervision of an enterprising owner. 

On the 16th of November, 1904, in Wellingborough. England, Mr. Goddard 
was united in marriage to Mss Ada Franklin and they are the parents of two 
children, Frances and Henry. Mr. Goddard belongs to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and has membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which 
he is a deacon. He takes a very active and helpful part in the church work and 
has taught the men's Bible class for sixteen years. 

Politically a democrat, Mr. Goddard is ever loyal to the party and there is 
a most interesting story concerning his relation with Governor Horner. When 
the latter was campaigning through the state in October, 1932, he visited .Mount 
Vernon and talked to the Jefferson county democratic committee. On that occa- 
sion Mr. Goddard, who was a committeeman, asked the Judge to pay his humble 
country home a visit. He also told the Judge to pay little heed to Jefferson 
county — that he (Goddard) would see to it that Horner would be a winner in 
the county, and he predicted a state victory for the democratic party in November. 
The following day Henry Horner visited Mr. Goddard's farm home, at which 
he spent two hours. Mr. Goddard was the owner of a prize Mock of white turkeys. 
one of which was an exceptional specimen. Judge Horner said it was the finesl 
turkey he had ever seen. .Inst before Thanksgiving that year, Mr. Goddard 
shipped this turkey to the Judge and it has since been his custom each Thanks- 
giving to supply a prize turkey for Governor Horner's dinner, a fine specimen 
being now fed especially for the Governor's Thanksgiving meal of 1934. Follow- 



310 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

ing bis election Governor Horner senl for Mr. Goddard and appointed him 
supervisor of highway maintenance patrol in February, 1933, with jurisdiction 
over five counties, thus doing something for the man whom be believed controlled 
the district for him. At the time Mr. Goddard's health would nol permit such an 
undertaking and he was appointed supervisor of patrol in Jefferson county. He 
has been a committeeman in his precinct for twelve years and has attended all 
the conventions of his party in recent years. He is a dependable citizen and a 
reliable public official, and he has many friends throughout Jefferson county. 

BRANSON WRIGHT 

Branson Wrighl is widely known as an able young attorney of Bloomington, 
practicing as junior member of the Law firm of stone & Wright. He was bom 
in Effingham, Illinois, December 4, 1898, his parents being William 15. and Dora 
West i Wright, also natives of this state. William P>. Wright is a graduate 
of Valparaiso University of Indiana. He served on the board of law examiners 
for sixteen years and is now on the bench for the twenty-fourth year as circuit 
judge of the fourth judicial district at Effingham. In the local ranks of the 
democratic party he has long been a leader. 

Branson Wright acquired his early education as a public school pupil of 
Effingham, Illinois, and continued his studies at Marion Institute for a year. 
Subsequently he spent two years at the United States Naval Academy of An- 
napolis, Maryland, by appointment of Dr. Foster, congressman from his home 
district. When this country declared war against Germany he enlisted in the 
National Guard, but he was never mustered into federal service. Having de- 
termined to follow in the professional footsteps of his father, he read law with 
the latter for three years and then entered the College of Law of Illinois Wes- 
leyan University at Bloomington, from which he was graduated in 192.") with 
the LL. B. degree. In 1924 he was admitted to the Illinois bar and also to 
practice in the federal court. While studying law he had been a court reporter 
for his father in Effingham and he also engaged in court reporting after coming 
to Bloomington. lie began the practice of his chosen profession in association 
with Judge Murphy at Lincoln, Illinois, where he served as city attorney in 
1926 and 1927. It was in 1929 that he left Lincoln for Bloomington and here 
joined the law firm of Stone & Taylor, which became Stone & Wright when 
Chalmer (\ Taylor was elected circuit judge of the eleventh judicial district 
in 1933. Mr. Wright was appointed United States court commissioner by Judge 
Louis Fitzhenry, resigning after two years' service in February, 1934. He has 
membership in both the McLean County Lai- Association and the Illinois State 
Bar Association. 

On the 25th of September, 1921, Mr. Wright was united in marriage to 
•lanet ('. Brouse, of Greenville, Illinois, and they are the parents of a, daughter, 
Phyllis. Mrs. Wright, who possesses considerable musical talent, is a teacher 
of music on the faculty of Illinois Wesleyan University. Mr. Wright has always 
been a stalwart supporter of the democratic party, lie has attained the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite in Masonry and is a worthy exemplar of the 
teachings and purposes of the craft. He is also a member of the Greek letter 
fraternity Phi Delta Phi, likewise belongs to the American Legion and enjoys 
deserved popularity among his fellow members of the Bloomington Club. 



FRANK M. HASKELL 



Frank M. Haskell, who is engaged in the <j'as and oil business at Mattoon, 
was here born June 26, 1896, a son of Charles and Minnie (McLane) Haskell, 
both of whom were natives of Illinois. The father engaged for an extended 
period in the coal and gas business but departed this life on the 6th of February, 
1931. I lis widow still survives and yet makes her home in .Mattoon. In their 
family were the following named: Clarence; .Myrtle, who passed away April ■'!. 
192b, and who was the wife of -I. I. Carlisle, engaged in the tar business in 




BRANSON WRIGHT 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 313 

Charleston; Harve ; Frank M., of this review; Raymond; Maggie, who died in 
infancy; Nellie, the wife of Fred House, a restaurant proprietor of Mattoon; 
Helen, the wife of John D. Freeman, who is in the garage business; and Harold, 
deceased. 

Frank M. Haskell pursued his education in the Mattoon schools until he had 
completed the work of the tenth grade in the high school. He then turned his 
attention to the garage business, in which he is still engaged, and he also con- 
ducts a general tire business. Close application and unfaltering enterprise 
have been the chief features in his growing business success. In politics he has 
also taken an active part and succeeded his father as ward committeeman of the 
fourth ward. He had attended all of the local conventions of his party and at 
the 1934 primaries he was named as the democratic candidate for the office of 
state representative, to which he was elected in November. Fraternally lie is 
connected with the Loyal Order of Moose, belonging to the lodge in Mattoon. 

On the 9th of November, 1913, Mr. Haskell was married to Miss Helen 
AVaggoner, a daughter of R. A. and Ruth (Kenney) Waggoner. The father 
was a shop man but is now deceased. The mother survives and is yet a resident 
of Mattoon. She was one of four children in the Waggoner family who are yet 
living, her brothers and sisters being : Joseph Waggoner, of Terre Haute, Indiana ; 
Harry, who also makes his home in Terre Haute ; and Anna, now the wife of 
Bert Spalding, who is employed by the Big Four Railroad at Mattoon. Mr. and 
Mrs. Haskell have five children: Francis, nineteen years of age; Harry, aged 
sixteen; Betty, thirteen ; Frank M., Jr., eleven ; and James Edmond, a lad of nine 
years. Mr. Haskell and his family attend the Methodist Church and are interested 
in all that makes for the benefit and betterment of the community. The family 
has always supported the democratic party, and the father of Frank M. Haskell 
had the notable record of serving for thirty-one years as alderman of the fourth 
ward, having at no time been defeated for the office. He died during his last 
term, which had only half expired when he was called away. He had been a 
most active worker for the party and its victories and his loss was widely felt 
in democratic circles. He enjoyed the high personal regard of all who knew 
him and his sterling worth was attested by all with whom he came in contact. 
Frank M. Haskell is also a well known and popular democrat of Coles county, 
where his friends are legion. Mrs. Haskell is a member of the women's organ- 
ization of Coles county, in the work of which she has been very active. 



TOM F. CROWLEY 

Among 1 Joliet's well known advocates of democracy is Tom F. Crowley, now 
one of the bridge operators of the city. A native of Ohio, he was born in the 
city of Cleveland, June 14, 1888, a son of William and Ellen (Scanlon) Crowley, 
both of whom are now deceased. The father was an earnest democrat who gave 
active support to the party for a half century. He removed from Ohio to 
Joliet in order to take charge of the wire mill which later became a unit of the 
American Steel & Wire Company. This was about a half century ago, and soon 
after his arrival he brought his family to this city. He started the mill here, put 
it in working condition and afterward served as night superintendent. lie always 
continued his political work, served as judge of elections and was otherwise active 
in behalf of the democratic party. 

Tom F. Crowley began his education in the schools of Cleveland an 1 sub- 
sequently continued his studies in .Joliet. where he completed two years' work 
of the high school course. When his student days were over lie began working 
in the rod mills, learning the trade, and thereafter he was employed for eighteen 
years as auditor by Swift & Company, Armour & Company and the Cudahy 
Backing Company. His long connection with the meat packing business well 
indicate his efficiency and his reliability, and the corporations which he repre- 
sented always spoke of his service in terms of high appreciation. On the 11th 
of September, 1933, he became bridge operator and has now filled the position 
for more than a year. 



::i 1 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

In 1909 Mr. Crowley was united in marriage to Miss Anna Becker and they 
are the parents of two daughters, Leone and Geraldine. Mr. Crowley has never 
swerved in his allegiance to the democratic party and many years ago served as 
precinct committeeman bul has always preferred that his political service should 
be done as a private citizen rather than as a public official. However, he is always 
active in the party and has been a delegate to the local democratic conventions. 



TERRY W. DAGLEY 



Terry W. Dagley, who has done most effective work in organizing the demo- 
cratic ranks so as to throw the whole party strength in supporl of the ticket, is 
now assistant purchasing agenl for the state, with offices in Springfield. lie 
was born in White county, Illinois, December 8, 1884, and is a son of Charles B. 
and Izetta (Questell) Dagley, who arc likewise natives of White county. The 
father devotes his attention to farming and has been a democrat throughout his 
entire life, giving standi allegiance to the party. 

Terry W. Dagley acquired his early education in the district schools and 
afterward attended a business college in Evansville, Indiana. As a young man 
he entered the employ of the Massey-llarris Company and later was with the 
International Harvester Company, his entire business experience being in con- 
nection with machinery and implements. In 1911) he entered the automobile trade 
at Carmi, Illinois, having a Ford ear agency which he conducted very success- 
fully until he became assistant purchasing agent of the state, receiving his 
appointment on the Kith of January, 1!K52, which was the first state appointment 
made south of Springfield. He followed in the political footsteps of his father 
and from the first has been a stalwart democrat, working effectively and earnestly 
in behalf of party strength and organization. In 1926 he was chosen a member 
of the AVhito county central committee and in the same year was made its 
chairman, in which capacity he has continuously served to the present time. 
He was first a recognized leader in Carmi township politics and now in White 
county, and lie has labored most rcsultantly in bringing out the party strength. 
Early in Governor Horner's campaign Mr. Dagley promised him from ten hun- 
dred to twelve hundred votes in White county, and when the votes were counted 
the Governor had polled eleven hundred and eighty-seven. Mr. Dagley likewise 
uses his influence in connection with the Carmi Democrat-Tribune to promote 
party successes. He is a member of its board of directors, and since May 1, 
1934, the journal has been published as a democratic organ. He has been a 
delegate to numerous state conventions of his party and also attended the demo- 
cratic national nominating conventions of 1924, 1928, and 1932. 

In 1914 Mr. Dagley was married to Miss Pearl Brown, of Carmi, Illinois, 
and they have a daughter, Frances Lee, who is now a senior in the Springfield 
high school. Mrs. Dagley is an active member of the Presbyterian Church of 
Carmi. Mr. Dagley belongs to the Masonic fraternity and he is interested in 
all that pertains to the social, intellectual and moral progress of his community. 
The cause of education has found in him a stalwart champion and for twelve 
years he served on the board of the grade schools of Carmi, while at the present 
writing, in 1934, lie is president of the Carmi high school board. 



HAROLD P. EVANS 

Harold P. Evans, of Woodstock, is occupying the position of motor fuel 
tax investigator. A native of Wisconsin, he was born in Corliss. April 8, 1903, 
his parents being Matthew and Anna (McCauley) Evans. The removal of the 
family to McHenry county, Illinois, enabled him to pursue his education in the 
public schools of Woodstock and in due time he was graduated from the Wood- 
stock high school witli the class of 192:5. He afterward was associated with his 
father in the conduct of a grocery and market in Woodstock until he entered the 
employ of the state. He was well known in the business circles of the city and 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 315 

he is equally well known in political circles. He has been active in local demo- 
cratic affairs since the campaign of 1932 and he is a member of the McHenry 
County Democratic Club. On the 14th of December, 1933, he was appointed 
foreman of the state highway department and on the 1st of June, 1934, he 
received appointment to the position of investigator of the department of finance 
in the motor fuel tax division, his territory covering McHenry, Boone and Du 
Page counties and the western end of Cook county. He attended the democratic 
state convention in Springfield, in 1934, where he was enthused by mass organiza- 
tion, realizing what can be accomplished through organized effort. 

On the 22d of October, 1932, Mr. Evans was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Bolger and they are the parents of a daughter, Mary Ellen. They are 
communicants of St. Marie's Catholic Church and Mr. Evans belongs to the 
Knights of Columbus. 

S. M. RIGGINS 

S. M. Riggins, manager of the state fish hatchery at Havana, was here born 
March 24, 1867, a son of William and Henrietta (McGee) Riggins. The father 
was a native of Indiana and the mother was born in Illinois, her people having 
come to this state from Tennessee. At the time of the discovery of gold in Cali- 
fornia, William Riggins crossed the plains, he and his brother Jesse leaving from 
Beardstown to seek a fortune in the west. Much of his life, however, was passed 
in this state and he had the distinction of driving Stephen A. Douglas to Beards- 
town when the latter was en route to Havana, where he participated in one of the 
memorable debates with Lincoln. Mr. Riggins was a coffin builder and carpenter 
in early life and subsequently became a grain buyer for the McFadden Com- 
pany, occupying the position for many years. In politics he was an active demo- 
crat. Mrs. Riggins died at the advanced age of ninety-three years and to the 
last she maintained a deep interest in public affairs and kept well informed on 
all questions of general concern. In her later years she read a most interesting 
paper before the Havana Women's Club concerning the pioneer times in Illinois 
through which she had lived. She, too, supported the democratic party and 
lived to vote for Horner and Roosevelt. 

S. M. Riggins was educated in the Havana schools, and starting out to pro- 
vide for his own support, opened a saloon in Havana. He afterward engaged 
in the automobile business, selling Hudson and Essex cars. 

In 1897 Mr. Riggins was married to Miss Maud R. Taylor, of Havana, Illi- 
nois, and they are the parents of three daughters, namely : Mrs. Mildred Mathews, 
who is an active supporter of the democratic party ; Mrs. Alice McVeigh, who 
is engaged in government welfare work; and Mabel, a resident of Havana, this 
state. 

Mr. Riggins belongs to the Elks lodge at Canton. He became an active demo- 
cratic worker when young and has continued faithful to the cause which he first 
espoused. His activities are now concentrated upon his work as inspector of the 
local fish hatchery at Havana and he is also in charge of the state fish ear. 



WILLIAM E. HOLLERICH 

William E. Hollerich was appointed postmaster at Spring Valley in August. 
1934, which fact is indicative of his allegiance to the democratic party. He is ;i 
native of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Henry county, October 7. 1*7!*. 
He pursued his early education in the schools of Bureau county and afterward 
attended St. Bede College at Peru. He next entered Lake Forest University at 
Lake Forest, Illinois, and when his textbooks were put aside he joined his father 
in the conduct of a flour and grain business at Spring Valley. He was thus an 
active factor in the commercial circles of the city for many years and his busi- 
ness enterprise constituted a factor in the upbuilding of the community. 

In 1913 Mr. Hollerich was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Jenkins and 
they are the parents of five children, as follows: Mary, Billy, Jack. Cornelius 



316 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Fraternally Mr. Hollerich is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America. 
Never has he faltered in his allegiance to the democratic party since age con- 
ferred upon him the right of franchise and lie lias long been an earnest party 
worker. For the past fifteen years he lias been township treasurer and also filled 
the position of township tax collector for two terms. He is now serving as 
postmaster at Spring Valley following his appointment in August, lf>:{4. and 
those who are familiar with his record ;is a business man and citizen do not hesi- 
tate to say that he will make an acceptable official. 



IRWIN 11. .MITCHELL 

Irwin II. Mitchell is well known in the business circles of .Massac county, 
Illinois, by reason of the fact that he is conducting a successful furniture store 
in Metropolis. lie is equally well known as a political leader in this section. 
being chairman of the democratic county central committee. He was born Sep- 
tember 28, 1890, in the county where lie still resides, his parents being Hamilton 
and Sophia (Houseman) Mitchell. His father was a lifelong democrat, at all 
times giving consistent support to the party. 

Irwin 11. Mitchell pursued a public school education up to and through 
the eighth grade. He then started out in the business world and his activities 
have brought him to a creditable position in commercial circles. He now carries 
a well selected line of furniture and his store in Metropolis is accorded a good 
patronage. He likewise owns a farm in Massac county and gives personal super- 
vision to the development and cultivation of his land. 

Mr. Mitchell is numbered among the veterans of the World war, having en- 
listed on the 13th of December, 1917, in the air service. He became a member of 
the Forty-third Balloon Company and was connected with the observation ser- 
vice overseas, remaining with the army until mustered out May 21, 191!). He 
now belongs to the American Legion and he also has membership with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and attends the Methodist Church — associations 
which indicate much of the nature of his interests and the rules that govern his 
conduct. The sterling worth of his character is recognized by all who know him 
and has gained for him many warm friends. The democratic party can always 
count upon his political allegiance and for a number of years he has been one of 
the earnest party workers, being made secretary of the county central committee 
in 1 !):>'_', while at the present writing he is acting as chairman thereof, doing 
effective work- as an organizer and in directing the interests of the party, which 
has gained notable successes in recent years. He lias also attended several of the 
county conventions and does everything in his power to further the interests of 
democracy. 



JOHN II. CONARD 



John II. Conard, who is engaged in farming near Lamoille. Bureau county, 

was born in Daviess county, Indiana, July 25, 1872, his parents being John S. 
and Nancy J. (McCarthy) Conard. The father passed away in 1910, but the 
mother is still living at the advanced age of eighty-nine years and makes her home 
with her children. Mr. Conard was an active democrat. The grandfather of 
our subject in the paternal line, also named John Conard, was one of the most 
enthusiastic supporters of the democratic party in Daviess county, Indiana. He 
operated a mill in the early days, and a1 one time, as a matter of jest, when a 
republican president was elected, a group of his neighbors erected a popular pole 
in front of his mill on which was placed the American flag, telling Mr. Conard that 
a democrat would never be elected. He vowed that when one was elected he 
would celebrate properly, and when Grover Cleveland was called to the presidency 
for his first term Mr. Conard raised a hickory pole one hundred feet high, and on 
it floated The stars and stripes. 

John II. Conard. the immediate subject of this review, was educated in the 
schools of Indiana and became a farmer there, also working at times in the timber. 




IRWIX H. MITCHELL 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 319 

Removing to Illinois, he settled in Newman, Douglas county, and there on the 
11th of November, 1897, was married to Miss Myrtle Shields. To them have been 
born seven children, namely: Fern, who is now postmaster of Lamoille; Ruth; 
John R. ; Harry, who is deceased; Leo; Max, who lias also passed away; and Lois. 
In 1910 Mr. Conard removed to the locality in which he now lives and eighl years 
ago came to his present farm, which is situated in the vicinity of Lamoille. He 
carries on general agricultural pursuits, raising the crops best adapted to soil 
and climate, and his fields yield to him a good return. 

Politically Mr. Conard has always been a stanch democrat and feels that lie 
never has nor never will have occasion to change his party allegiance. He is now 
serving for the second term as precinct committeeman, and he can recall the day 
when lie was the only democrat in the precinct. After calling the attention of the 
election board to the fact that no democrat was on the board he was made ;i judge 
of elections and lias since served. He has lived to witness steady growth in demo- 
cratic sentiment in his locality and today the party receives strong support from 
Bureau county. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the United 
Brethren Church, while fraternally he is affiliated with the Masons. 



JOHN J. HAYES 



John J. Hayes, of Woodstock, is inspector for the division of food and dairies. 
He has spent his entire life in Mcllenry county, his birth having occurred in 
Hartland township, July 28, 1881, his parents being John II. and Mary E. 
(Sullivan) Hayes. The father was also a native of Hartland township, Mcllenry 
county. 

In his youthful days John J. Hayes attended the public schools of Harvard 
and in young manhood he obtained a position in a grocery store there, working 
in that way until 1901, when he came to Woodstock, where he spent seventeen 
years with the Oliver Typewriter Company. His long connection with that 
business indicates plainly his fidelity and his efficient service as well as the trust 
reposed in him by those whom he represented. In 1918 he began selling auto- 
mobiles and in 1925 he established an insurance agency on his own account, 
selling general insurance. In this business he has since continued and has gained 
many clients. 

On the 1st of February, 1910, Mr. Hayes was united in marriage to Miss Etta 
Goodrow and they are the parents of three children, namely: Helen, John J., Jr., 
and Mary Jane. The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic Church. 
Politically Mr. Hayes has always been a democrat and has taken active part in 
politics since 1912, serving at various periods as a member of the county central 
committee. In 1932 he was elected precinct committeeman and served for two 
years, and from 1932 until 1934 he was secretary of the democratic county 
central committee. On the 20th of November, 1933, lie was appointed inspector 
of the division of food and dairies, his ten-dory covering Mcllenry, Lake, Kane 
and De Kalb counties. In 1932 he attended the state democratic convention as 
a delegate and in 1934 as a visitor. He has a wide acquaintance among the political 
leaders of this part of the state and all recognize the fact that lie is proving a 
capable and trustworthy officeholder. Having always lived in Mcllenry county, 
he is well known here and his circle of friends is almost coextensive with the 
circle of his acquaintance. 

JOHN F. JASPER 

John F. Jasper, a member of the state police, makes his home at 1501 Ken- 
tucky avenue in Quincy, which is his native city, his birth having here occurred 
February 28, 189"). He is a son of Bernard and Angela Anna (Klosterman) 
Jasper. His early education, acquired in a parochial school of Quincy, was 
supplemented by study in the high school of this city, of which lie is a graduate. 
He also attended a night school of St. Louis and he started out to provide for 
his own support by working as a railroad clerk with the Wabash Railway Com- 



320 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

pany, being employed in thai connection in Quincy for five years. In 1918, the 
United suites having entered the World war. he joined the army as a member 
of the motor truck division and in October, 1918, lie went t<> Prance, where he 

remained until September, 1919, when he returned to his native country. He had 
been made a corpora] in the month in which he crossed the Atlantic. 

Returning to Quincy, -Mr. Jasper has since made his home here and has 
always been active in politics as a supporter of the democratic party. He has 
served as deputy county treasurer, has been a city detective and has also been a 
member of the Quincy police force. In .March, l!l.'>:!, he was appointed highway 
maintenance policeman and has since served in this capacity. He is interested 
in all that pertains to the success of his party and his work has been far-reaching 
and beneficial. 

On the 23d of duly, 1923, "Slv. Jasper was united in marriage to .Miss Laura 
Holcomb. In his fraternal relations he is an Eagle and a Moose and has many 
friends in those organizations, as he also has in the American Legion, in which 
he likewise has membership. 

ANTON A. MACROWSKI, JR. 

Anton A. Macrowski, dr.. who is connected with democratic official service, 
having been appointed automobile license investigator in the state, November 7, 
1933, was born in North Chicago, Lake county, Illinois, May 12, 1907, and still 
makes his home in this city. He is a son of Anton and Stella Macrowski, who 
are yel residents of North Chicago, where the father has been engaged in busi- 
ness for many years. 

At the usual age Anton A. Macrowski, Jr., bee; me a pupil in the public 
schools of his native city and afterward attended the high school at Waukegan, 
Illinois, while for a short time he was a student in a Chicago seminary. He started 
out in the business world as an employe in the shipping department of a Chicago 
foundry. Later he became foreman of the BinVx Corporation, a subsidiary of 
the < >aks Products. Here his capability and fidelity won him promotion to the 
position of assistant superintendent and production manager and thus he gained 
an important place in the business circles of North Chicago. On the 7th of 
November, 1983, he received appointment to his present position as automobile 
license investigator and has since served in this capacity, making an excellent 
record in office. 

On the 23d of April. 1932, Mr. Macrowski was united in marriage to Miss 
Agnes Sammon and they are the parents of a daughter, Patricia Marie. The 
family attend the Holy Rosary Catholic Church and Mr. Macrowski is identified 
with the Polish National Alliance. Politically he has always been a democrat 
and the party has found in him a consistently active worker and supporter. He 
was made precinct committeeman in 1932. He belongs to various democratic 
clubs, including the Lake County Democratic Club, and he has been a delegate 
to the state conventions. In 1932 he was chosen secretary of the county central 
committee, acting as secretary of the county organization which was the first 
complete democratic organization in Lake county. In 1932 and again in 1934 his 
precinct was the banner democratic precinct of the county. His labors have been 
productive of good results and he is recognized as one of the strong forces amoiig 
the democratic workers of northeastern Illinois. 



THOMAS J. DRISCOLL 

Being the only democrat in Peoria to be elected assistant supervisor in the 
1933 election <rives Thomas J. Driseoll the distinction of being a vote getter and 
the democratic party regards him as a valuable asset. Born in Peoria, Illinois. 
.March 19, 1886, he is a son of Daniel and Anna i Carroll) Driseoll. The father, 
also a native of Peoria, was a son of Dennis Driseoll, who came from Ireland and 
cast in his lot with the pioneer residents of Peoria county. Daniel Driseoll 
married Anna Carroll, also a native of Peoria and a daughter of Michael Carroll. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 321 

who was likewise of Irish birth and became one of the early residents of Peoria 
county. To Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Driscoll were born thirteen children, of whom 
ten are living, namely : Michael, James, Daniel, John, William, Carroll, Joseph, 
Thomas J., Nellie and Marian. The last named, who is Mrs. James Jordan, is a 
radio artist. Two of the sons, Joseph and Carroll, served in the World war 
and both were overseas. 

Thomas J. Driscoll was educated in the schools of Peoria county and after 
his textbooks were put aside he became a coal miner, following; that line of work 
for a number of years. Later he entered the restaurant business in the vicinity 
of the Peoria stock yards. His first political office is the one that he is now holding 
— that of assistant supervisor. He has always voted with the democratic party 
since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and he is a member of the 
Eighth Ward Democratic Club. 

Mr. Driscoll married Miss Marie Hart and they reside at 405 Livingston 
street in Peoria. Mr. Driscoll is a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. 



EDWARD J. VERSHAW 

In September, 1933, Edward J. Vershaw of East Moline was appointed 
highway maintenance patrolman. His name indicates his Holland birth. He first 
opened his eyes to the light of day in the land of the dikes on the 10th of March, 
1881, his parents being Thomas and Louise (Hamerlynck) Vershaw, also natives 
of Holland, whence they came with their family of ten children to America about 
1890. Crossing the continent to Illinois, they settled on a farm between Galva and 
Kewanee, living there for about two years, on the expiration of which period they 
removed to Kewanee, where the father and mother spent their remaining days, 
the former being employed as a factory worker. He was a good democrat through- 
out the period of his residence on this side of the Atlantic. He died January 4, 
1930, having for a few months survived his wife, who passed away July 20, 1929. 

Edward J. Vershaw attended the public schools of Kewanee and took up 
factory work there, following that line for about eight years. He then became a 
plumber and steamfitter and on the 10th of March, 1912, removed to East Moline, 
where he was employed in the same line of business until September, 1933, when 
he was made highway maintenance patrolman. He has since served and his name 
is on the roll of trustworthy officials. 

On the 15th of June, 1912, Mr. Vershaw was united in marriage to Miss Ella 
Fuerst, of Kewanee, Illinois, and to them have been born four children : Thomas; 
Edward; Catherine; and Frank, who is deceased. The religious faith of the 
family is that of the Catholic Church and Mr. Vershaw is also identified with 
the Fraternal Order of Eagles. He has always been an active democrat, working 
for the party when in Kewanee as well as in East Moline, where for twelve years 
he has been precinct committeeman, having but recently retired from that 
position. 

HARRY E. FERGUSON 

Harry E. Ferguson, of the highway maintenance patrol, was born on the farm 
which he still occupies in Western township, Henry county, Illinois, his natal day 
being October 29, 1882. He is a son of George W. and Inez E. (Hitchcock) 
Ferguson, of whom the latter is still living. The father, who died in 1925, was a 
farmer by occupation, devoting his entire life to the tilling of the soil until 
he became interested in banking. He helped to organize a private bank at 
Orion and the institution was later made a state bank, of which he became presi- 
dent, thus serving for several years. Politically he followed an independent 
course, voting for men and measures rather than for party. 

In the acquirement of his education Harry E. Ferguson attended the high 
school of Oalesburg, Illinois, from which he was graduated on the completion 
of the regular course. He then look up the occupation of farming, to winch he 
had been reared, having early been trained in tin 1 work of the fields and the care 



322 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

of the crops. 1 1 i>> attention was then concentrated upon the further development 
and improvement of Harm property until the death of his wife, and he also 
specialized in the raising of shorthorn cattle. 

On the 17th of June, 1908, Mr. Ferguson was united in marriage to Miss 
Mildred Rutledge, a native of Orion, Illinois, and they became parents of two 
children. Lenore and Ruth. .Mr. Ferguson belongs to the Masonic fraternity 
and is a Baptist in Ids religious faith. Politically he has always voted with the 
democratic party and on the 11th of May, 1934. he was made a highway main- 
tenance patrolman, to the duties of winch position he is now giving consistent 
action and earnest thought. 



JAMES EDWARD LYNCH 

• lames Edward Lynch, an investigator in the department of conservation, 
makes his home at Fox Lake. He was born in Chicago, January 30, 1898, a son 
of Joseph and Mary Lynch, both of whom have now passed away. He acquired 
his education in the schools of his native city and in early life learned the glazier's 
trade, which he followed for about eight years, becoming an expert workman in 
that line. In the spring of 1916, he came to Fox Lake where he has since resided. 
On the 15th of May, 1934, he was appointed to the position of investigator in the 
department of conservation. He has always been a stalwart democrat and is 
now serving as precinct committeeman. 

On the 18th of March, 1918, Mr. Lynch was united in marriage to Miss 
Martha Steinbring and they are the parents of a daughter, Marlene. Mr. Lynch 
is a trustee of the Community Church of Fox Lake and is interested in all that 
pertains to the material, social and moral as well as the political progress of the 
locality. 



FRED PUNDSACK 



Fred Pundsack, of Pinckneyville, who is filling the office of special field 
representative for occupational tax, was born in Franklin county, Illinois, Febru- 
ary 17, 1903, his parents beino- Clem and Catherine (Schultz) Pundsack. The 
father Avas born in Effingham county, Illinois, in 1858 and became a farmer. He 
settled in Franklin county in 1901 and there engaged in speculating in real estate 
and coal lands, winning success by reason of his sound judgment in business 
affairs. After four years he removed to Duquoin, Perry county, where he spent 
his remaining days. Although the other members of his family were supporters 
of the republican party, he became a stalwart democrat. 1 1 is religious faith 
was that of the Catholic Church. His wife, who was born in Effingham county, 
Illinois, was like her husband reared in a republican household but became a 
democrat. 

Fred Pundsack, who was one of a family of four sons and four daughters, 
attended the public schools of Duquoin and a parochial school to the age of 
fifteen years, when he went to South Dakota. He was employed at odd jobs. 
also doing farm work, working in construction camps, at the carpenter's trade 
and in other ways earning his living in the west until 1919, when lie returned 
to Illinois. He was later employed as weighmaster at the mines until 1922, when 
he established his home in Pinckneyville and for a year traveled. In 1923 he 
became Ford agent at Pinckneyville, continuing to represent that line of auto- 
mobiles until 1932. He was elected county commissioner in 1930, serving for 
one term, and after his retirement from that office was made special field repre- 
sentative for occupational tax. 

In 1924 .Mr. Pundsack was married in Duquoin, Illinois, to Ruby Harris, 
a daughter of J. W. Harris, a well known farmer and active supporter of the 
democratic party. Mr. and Mrs. Pundsack have two sons, Fred and William. 
aged respectively eight and six years. Mr. Pundsack enjoys ouail hunting and 
finds social relationship in the Elks lodge and tin' Knights of Columbus. He is 




FRED PUXDSACK 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 325 

also a past Rotarian and he has been chairman of the county emergency relief 
committee. A young man, full of ambition and energy, one does not hesitate 
to prophesy for him a future in which progress and desired results will be 
dominant factors. 



JOSEPH W. RUSSELL 

Joseph W. Russell, democratic representative from the twenty-sixth district 
in the fifty-eighth general assembly of Illinois and now a candidate for renom- 
ination to the state legislature, is a popular and prominent young native son 
of Roberts, Ford county. Illinois, horn -Inly 29, 1900. His parents are Joseph 
R. and Nora (Riordon) Russell, mentioned on another page of this work in con- 
nection with the sketch of John P. Russell, brother of our subject. 

In the acquirement of an education Joseph W. Russell attended the public 
schools of Roberts until he had completed the high school course by graduation 
with tlie class of 1919. He then entered the College of Agriculture of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, from which institution he was graduated in 1923. During the 
past eleven years lie has been successfully engaged in farming and the raising 
of live stock in Ford county in association with his two brothel's. 

Elected a member of the house of representatives of the fifty-eighth genera] 
assembly from the twenty-sixth district, Mr. Russell has made a Legislative record 
that has fully justified the confidence and support of his constituents. 



.MARTIN .1. NAYLON 



Among Ogle county's well known and representative residents is Martin 
•I. Naylon, now the postmaster at Polo, in which city he was born February 7. 
1876. His parents were .Martin and Mary (Callahan) Naylon, both of whom 
were natives of Ireland, the father's birth having there occurred in 1S49. while 
tlie mother's natal day was April 6, 1851. They came to America when young 
people, Martin Naylon 1 crossing the Atlantic about 1867 and Ids future wife 
about two years later. They were married November 16, 1872, in Chicago. Mr. 
Naylon settled in Chicago, Illinois, where he engaged in business as a mason and 
bricklayer, hut about 1S7L> removed to Polo, Ogle county, where his remaining 
days were passed. For about twenty years he was employed with the Illinois 
Central Railroad and for about fifteen years was in the service of the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy Railroad as section foreman. He voted with the demo- 
cratic party, to which lie gave stanch support, and his religious faith was that 
of the Catholic Church. His death occurred in 1923. 

Reared in Polo, Martin J. Naylon here attended the public schools and started 
out to provide for his own support by clerking in a dry -goods store, being thus 
employed for ten years. In 190.") he went west and for six years remained in that 
part of the country, living in Utah and Nevada. In 1911 he returned to Polo, 
where he became manager for the dry-goods business of Myers Brothers, con- 
tinuing to fill that responsible position for eight years. In 1920 he went to Dixon 
with the McAllister Dry Goods Company, with which he remained for seven 
years. With his return to Polo he began selling life insurance in 1927 and carried 
on the business until July 1, 1934, when lie became postmaster. Like his father, 
he has always voted the democratic ticket and in 1932 he was elected precinct 
committeeman, serving for two years, hut was not again a candidate. He pre- 
fers that his political work shall he done as a private citizen and in all matters 
that pertain to the public welfare he is found as an earnest supporter. In 1928 
he was a minority election judge in his precinct and one of thirteen democratic 
voters in precinct two. Several incidents relative to the voting of the straight 
democratic ticket, even when their closest neighbors were candidates on the 
republican ticket are interesting facts in the lives of both Martin -I. Naylon and 
his father. 

On the 21st of June, 1900, in Klv. Nevada, Mr. Navlon married Terese E. 



126 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Meloj and they are the parents of four children, as follows: Martin J. (Ill), 
Carl, .lack and Richard. The family arc communicants of the Catholic Church 
and Air. Naylon belongs to the Knights of Columbus, becoming a charter member 
of the council al Dixon. 



ALPHONSE S. LEGRIS 

Alphonse S. LeGris, chief clerk for the Manteno State Hospital, was called 
to this position June 24, lit-'!:!, by reason of his democratic allegiance and his 
capability Tor the performance of the duties that devolve upon him. A native 
son of Illinois, he was born in Bourbonnais, duly 4, 1890, a son of Harvey J. and 
Louise (Granger) LeGris. The father was a faithful follower of democracy 
and an active party worker who several years ago served as an alderman in 
Kankakee. 

After attending the common schools Alphonse S. LeGris continued his edu- 
cation in St. Viator College at Bourbonnais, where he was graduated with the 
class of 1909, at which time the Bachelor of Arts degree was conferred upon him. 
After he had completed his course he worked on a farm for two years and in 
lull he became associated with his father in the conduct of a bank, with which 
he remained until 1928. He then accepted a banking position in Chicago, which 
he resigned a few years later. This gave him broad business experience which 
has well qualified him for his subsequent duties. 

On the 22d of April, 1!U4, in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, Mr. LeGris was 
muted in marriage to Eva L. Letourneau, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Philip 
Letourneau, of Chippewa Falls. Mr. and Mrs. LeGris are the parents of two 
children, Hose Marie and Harvey J. The family are communicants of the Catho- 
lic Church and Mr. LeGris is well known in fraternal circles, being an Elk, a 
Knight of Columbus, a Moose and an Eagle. He is in full sympathy with the 
beneficient spirit which underlies these organizations and loyally toiiows their 
teachings. Politically he has always been a democrat and for many years has 
been active in parly work. He has attended many county and state conventions 
and was a delegate from Kankakee, Illinois, to the national convention in Chi- 
cago, in 1932, when Franklin I). Roosevelt was nominated for the presidency. 
On the 24th of dune, 1933, he was appointed chief clerk of the Manteno State 
Hospital, an institution for the insane at Manteno, and has since faithfully 
served in that capacity, discharging his duties in a prompt, systematic and efficient 
manner. He is most loyal to any cause which he espouses and all who know him 
bear testimony to the sterling worth of his character. 



LEWIS T. RASH 



On the 1st of September, 1933, Lewis T. Rash was appointed state sales tax 
investigator in district 41 and is now serving most acceptably in that capacity. 
He makes his home in Rosielarc and is a native son of Hardin county, where his 
birth occurred September 13, 1886. 

After acquiring a common school education Lewis T. Rash attended the 
Normal School at Elizabethtown, Illinois, and was graduated in 1 5)02. receiving 
a first-grade certificate. He also took special work and accounting in La Salle 
I 'Diversity at Chicago. His business affairs have largely been farming interests 
and he successfully controls and manages his land, deriving therefrom a good 
income. 

On the 26th of November, 1905, in Elizabethtown, Illinois, Air. Rash was 
united in marriage to .Miss Maud S. Smith and they are the parents of three 
children: Ruey M., Hattie M. and Helen. Fraternally Air. Rash is a Mason, 
loyal to the high principles and teachings of the order, and he is also a consistent 
member of the .Methodist Church. During the World war he served as a member 
of the draft board and at all times he is active in support of civic projects 
which are of worth to the community. In politics he has always been a demo- 
crat and has held various offices. In 1910 he was elected county clerk, serving until 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 327 

1 < > 1 : J , when he resigned the office to accept an appointment as postmaster of 
Elizabethtown, a position which he filled most efficiently for eight and one-half 
years. He then bought the Elizabethtown Independent, which he published until 
1922, when he was elected assessor and treasurer of Hardin county, and again 
the prompt and faithful discharge of his duties gained him high commendation. 
On the 1st of September, 1933, he became state sales tax investigator in District 
41, and every office in which he has served has been most creditably filled, owing 
to his marked devotion to duty and his high standards of service. He has attended 
several of the state conventions of his party and is well known as a democratic 
leader in his section of Illinois. 



OSCAR ALBERT OLSON 

For more than a year and a half Oscar Albert Olson has been a membei 
of the state police, and his appointment to the office on the 6th of March, 1!*:!.;. 
is in itself indication of his connection with the democratic party. He makes 
his home in Elgin, where he was born November 2-3. 1895, a son of Oscar Albert 
and Josephine Olson. The father is now deceased, but the mother survives. 

The schools of his native city afforded Oscar A. Olson, Jr.. his educational 
opportunities and in his youthful days he became well known as a football and 
baseball player, taking a very active interest in those sports. He played in the 
semi-professional football teams and in the minor league baseball teams, play- 
ing football for Elgin and baseball in the West Canadian League. Later he 
became a watchmaker in Elgin and continued to work in the watch factory for 
fourteen years, his long connection therewith being proof of his capability and 
his fidelity to the interests which he represented. He thus continued to serve 
until March (i. 1933, when he became a member of the state police force. 

On the 30th of November. 1!»22. .Mr. Olson was united in marriage to Miss 
Dorothy McQueeny and they are the parents of a son, Thomas Graham, now 
in his second year. Mrs. Olson is a member of the Catholic Church. Mr. Olson 
is identified with the Fraternal Order of Eagles. In politics he has always been 
an active democrat, with firm faith in the party principles as factors in good 
government. 

OLIVER MARTIN COLWELL 

Toulon's postmaster, Oliver Martin Colwell, is recognized as one of the 
strongest supporters of the democratic party in Stark county. He was appointed 
to his present position on the 1st of January, 1934, and is now efficiently dis- 
charging the duties of the office. He was born in Naperville, Illinois, December 
17, 1888, a son of Marvin Henry and Mary | Kendig) Colwell, who were lifelong 
supporters of the democratic party. On two occasions his father was candidate 
for county superintendent of schools but was defeated with the entire ticket. 

Oliver M. Colwell was <rraduated from Naperville high school in ]!)()."> and 
for a year thereafter attended North Central College at Naperville, pursuing a 
business course. He is numbered among the veterans of the World war, having 
enlisted at St. Paul. Minnesota. -June 26, 1918. He was sent to Camp Grant at 
Kockford, Illinois, where he remained for a month, and on the 25th of August, 
1918, embarked at Hoboken, landing at Glasgow, Scotland, on the 9th of Sep- 
tember and reachin<r Le Havre. Prance, two days later. On the return voyage 
he embarked at St. Nazaire, May 14, 1919, and reached New York, May 27. re 
ceiving his discharge at Camp Dix, New .Jersey, on the 29th. He had been made 
a corporal and he now has membership in American Legion Post No. 416 of 
Toulon, of which he was the first commander, serving for two years. 

On the 6th of .January. 1920, in Toulon. Mr. Colwell was united in marriage 
to Miss Ruth Harding, representative of a well known democratic family of 
Wyoming. To them has been born a daughter, Gloria, who is now nine years of 
age. Mr. and Mrs. Colwell hold membership in the Congregational Church and 



328 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

he is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Toulon Civic Club. He 
lias always voted with the democratic party and has attended all of the state 
and national conventions for several years. On the 1st of .January, 1!)34, he 
became acting postmaster and received his official appointment on the 27th of 
April following, 1ml whether in office or out of it, he works consistently for the 
party and is always loyal to the best interests of the community. 



MRS. XAOMA (HUX) FISHER 



.Mi's. Naoma (Hux) Fisher, who resides at Villa Grove and who was post- 
mistress of the house of representatives at Springfield during the legislative 
sessions, is a native of southeastern Missouri and a daughter of William .1. and 
Frances (Bradford) Hux, who were natives of North Carolina and of Tennessee. 
respectively. Her father was a merchant and also operated several cotton gins 
in Stoddard county, Missouri, where he likewise took active part in democratic 
politics as a committeeman for several years. In fact he was a recognized leader 
of the party in his section of the state and he attended all the state, congressional 
and judicial conventions, oftentimes as a delegate. He was also a delegate to 
several democratic national conventions and was a well known figure among the 
leaders of the party in this section of the country. He died in 1932, having for 
a number of years survived his wife, who passed away in 1923. 

After completing a course in the grade and high schools of Stoddard county, 
Missouri, Naomi Hux attended Marion College for two years and afterward was 
graduated from Martha Washington College of Virginia as a member of the 
class of 1914, receiving the Bachelor of Arts degree and the degree in public 
speaking. In 1917 she became the wife of Carl P. Fisher, who was born in 
Douglas county, Illinois, a son of William Porter and Florence (Jones) Fisher. 
His father followed farming and was a stalwart advocate of democratic princi- 
ples. Carl P. Fisher attended the public schools of Douglas county and after 
leaving high school began railroading on the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad. 
He has since remained with that corporation and is now serving as a conductor. 
He, too, has always been a stanch democrat. He belongs to the Brotherhood of 
Railroad Trainmen and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

Mrs. Fisher has been active in democratic work since 1922 and served 
as county chairman from 1932 until 1934. She attends all the local democratic 
meetings and on several occasions has been in attendance at judicial and con- 
gressional conventions, while at all times she has given support to the entire 
party ticket. She was elected postmistress of the house of representatives in 
January, 1933. Both Mr. and Mrs. Fishr are members of the Douglas County 
Jeffersonian Club and they attend the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mrs. Fisher 
is a member of the Women's Federated Club of Villa Grove and is serving on 
the library board. Both give their active aid and cooperation to all movements 
for the public good, working assiduously for progress, reform and improvement 



CHARLES A. STANTON 

Charles A. Stanton, residing at Ingleside and serving as a sergeant of the 
state police force, was born at Long Lake, in Lake county, Illinois, January 26, 
1901, his parents being Henry and Harriette (Stratton) Stanton. The mother is 
a sister of William J. Stratton, who served as secretary of state of Illinois from 
1M29 until 1933. Henry Stanton was always an active democrat, regarded as 
one of the leading party workers of his township. Tom Stanton, the paternal 
grandfather of Charles A. Stanton, filled the office of township supervisor in 
Lake county for twenty years and was most actively interested in the public 
life of the community, doing much for general progress and improvement. Jack 
Stratton, the maternal grandfather of C. A. Stanton, served as supervisor when 
Lake Villa township was created. Frank Stanton, uncle of Mr. Stanton of this 
review, is now township supervisor, a position which he has occupied for twelve 




MRS. NAOMA FISHER 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 331 

years, and Harry Stratton, an uncle of Charles A. Stanton, also is supervisor 
of Lake Villa township. William Stratton was supervisor for twenty-two years, 
being only twenty-two years of age when first elected to the position. Various 
members of the Stratton and Stanton families have been supporters of the demo- 
cratic party, while others have been equally loyal advocates of republican prin- 
ciples, each manifesting unfaltering allegiance to the cause which he espoused. 

Charles A. Stanton, whose name introduces tnis record, was educated in 
the public schools and reared in Lake county, where he lias spent his entire Lfe. 
He became a building contractor and followed the business until 1932. On the 
loth of February, 1933, he was appointed a sergeant of the state police force, 
in charge of the second district, which includes Lake, McIIenry, Boone, Kane, 
Du Page, Kendall and De Kalb counties. He has always voted with the demo- 
cratic party and in 1932 he was a candidate for the state legislature on the Horner 
ticket, losing by a very small margin in a district which has always been strongly 
republican — a fact indicative of his personal popularity and the confidence re- 
posed in him by his fellow townsmen. He served for one term as chairman of 
the executive board of the county central committee and he organized the Horner 
campaign in Lake county and was a delegate to the state convention. His 
mother, Mrs. Harriette Stanton, is now a member of the executive board of the 
Women's Lake County Organization and was offered the chairmanship of the 
county organization but declined. Throughout her entire life she has been an 
active democrat. Her son, Charles A. Stanton, became a charter member of the 
original Lake County Democratic Club and he has never wavered in his allegiance 
to the party. 

In 1921 Mr. Stanton was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Lane and 
they are the parents of a son, Ralph. Mr. Stanton is a member of the Catholic 
Church and was formerly identified with the Knights of Columbus and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He is a descendant of two of the old and promi- 
nent families of northeastern Illinois — families that have always stood for prog- 
ress and improvement — and he has ever upheld the Stantons' record in this 
connection. As a business man and as a citizen he has gained a wide acquaintance 
and the circle of his friends is almost coextensive therewith. 



PATRICK HENRY McKEONE 

Patrick Henry McKeone, well known in Lacon, his native city, is now serv- 
ing as postmaster. He was here born January 1, 1871, a son of Patrick and Mary 
(Clark) McKeone, both of whom were supporters of the democratic party. The 
father served as city marshal and bridge tender and was alderman of the south 
ward of Lacon for the notably long period of eighteen years. He carefully and 
thoughtfully considered all the vital questions which had to do with municipal 
welfare and his work was entirely beneficial to the city. 

Patrick H. McKeone attended the grade schools of Lacon and also the high 
school of that place. He then pursued a private course in bookkeeping and thus 
qualified for life 's practical and responsible duties. 

Mr. McKeone was reared in the Catholic faith and is still a communicant 
of the church. His political support has always been given to the democratic 
party and he has been active as a worker in its ranks since casting his first vote. 
He served as a member of the board of review in 1916 and again from 1922 to 
1926 inclusive. From 1914 to 1916 he served the finance department in the 
matter of inheritance taxes and appraising estates for the federal government 
in Marshal county, and he served as precinct committeeman of Precinct No. 1 
of the city of Lacon for several terms covering approximately thirty-five years 
and at one time served all three wards as committeeman. He attended the first 
state convention held in Springfield in 1904 and has been present at various other 
state conventions. On the 1st of June, 1934, he was appointed acting postmaster 
of Lacon and is now filling the office. His entire life has here been passed, and 



332 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

that his record lias always been a creditable one is indicated in the fact that many 
of his stanchesl friends arc those who have known him from his boyhood days 
to the present. 

ALBERT W. SCHIMMEL 

Alberl \V. Schimmel, who became a member of the bar in 1925 and who for 
four years was state's attorney of Pike county, now practices his profession in 
Pittsfield. He was horn iii Marietta. Ohio, July 16, 1890, a son of Charles and 
Caroline (Marsh) Schimmel, who were also natives of Marietta, the former horn 
September 28, 1851, and the latter on the 13th of December, 1854. The father 
was a farmer and insurance man in Washington county, Ohio, and for over a 
half century he was very active in the affairs of the democratic party in his com- 
munity. For four decades he was a member of the democratic county central 
committee and for several terms he filled the office of county commissioner. He 
held membership in the Lutheran Church and in that faith passed away July 1!'. 
1931. 

The public school system of Marietta, Ohio, afforded Alberl W. Schimmel his 
caily educational opportunities. Later he entered Marietta College and on the 
completion of his literary course received the Bachelor of Arts degree. lie next 
attended Purdue University at LaPayette, Indiana, for a year as a graduate 
student ami also acted as chemistry teacher. Matriculating in the Illinois Wes- 
leyan University at Bloomington, he pursued his law course and won the LL. B. 
degree in 1925. In the same year he opened an office and beg'an practice in 
Pittsfield, where he has made continuous progress, being now accorded a liberal 
clientage. His professional duties have occupied the major part of his time and 
attention and the only office that he has filled has been in the direct path of his 
chosen calling, for he served as state's attornev of Pike countv from 1928 until 
1932. 

On the 6th of August, 1914, Mr. Schimmel was married to Miss Mary Helen 
Miller, a daughter of Dr. J. E. and Margaret (Goodin) Miller. They have be- 
come parents of two children, Margaret Mildred and Albert W., Jr. Fraternally 
Mr. Schimmel is a Mason, belonging to Pittsfield Lodge, No. 790, A. P. & A. M., 
and he also has membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is 
widely and favorably known, his record as a lawyer and a citizen commending him 
to the goodwill and confidence of his fellow- townsmen. 



JOHN H. STANTON 



John H. Stanton, a resident of Ingleside, is serving as a member of the demo- 
cratic county central committee of Lake county and in filling the office of auto- 
mobile license investigator for the state. He was born in Grant township, Lake 
county, in 1895, a son of Henry and Harriette (Stratton) Stanton. The father 
has passed away, but the mother is still living. The family has long been repre- 
sciited in northeastern Illinois, having been established here in pioneer times, 
and for the past sixty or seventy years some member of the Stanton family has 
been an incumbent in local township offices. Harry Stratton, an uncle of John 
H. Stanton in the maternal line, is serving as supervisor of Lake Villa township 
at this writing. 

In the township high school John H. Stanton completed his education, and 
for twenty-one years he was associated with members of his family in the opera- 
tion of a bus line to and from the various lakes in this vicinity. In fact his 
family has carried on this type of business from the early days when passengers 
were transported to and from trains in a light milk wagon drawn by horses. 
They have, moreover, been instrumental in the building of roads and highways 
and in the general development and improvement of this section. On the 1st 
of November, 1933, John H. Stanton became an automobile license investigator 
for the state and has since acted in this capacity. His appointment came to him 
as a follower of the democratic party. He has always been one of its stanch sup- 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 333 

porters since attaining his majority and lias served as a delegate to various party 
conventions for a number of years. He is now serving for the second term as 
precinct committeeman and lie is a member of the executive committee of the 
county central committee and also is serving on the patronage board. 

On the 18th of October, 1915, Mr. Stanton was united in marriage to Miss 
Loretta Ilobbs and they are the parents of two daughters: Ilarriette, who has 
recently graduated from high school; and Dorothy, a high school student. The 
elder daughter was state champion in a typewriting contest and won second 
place at A Century of Progress in Chicago. The religious faith of the family is 
that of the Catholic Church. The Stantons are indeed well known in Lake county, 
where the family has been represented for many decades, and John II. Stanton has 
at all times upheld the unsullied reputation associated with the family name. 
They have been loyal and progressive in citizenship, and he whose name intro- 
duces this review has ever held to the ideals of public service' which the family 
has followed. 



JEROME PALL HANNON 

The highway maintenance patrol in Kane county finds a representative in 
Jerome Paul Hannon, who has served in this connection since February 1-4. 1933. 
He makes his home in Elburn, Illinois, where he was born November 6. 1902. a 
son of Albert Jerome and Mary Hannon, who are still residents of Elburn. the 
father and all of the family being stanch advocates of the democratic party. 

Jerome Paul Hannon acquired his education in the schools of Elburn and 
afterward obtained a position with the Burred Engineering &. Construction 
Company of Aurora. He worked for that corporation all over the United States. 
working in reinforced concrete, constructing grain elevators. He continued to 
serve in that connection for eight years, a fact which indicates his faithfulness 
to the company which he represented and the efficiency of his work. He left the 
position to become a highway maintenance patrolman following his appointment 
February 14, 1933. Like the others of his family, he has always been an active 
democrat and an earnest party worker. Much of his life has been passed in 
Elburn, so that his record is as an open book, and he can claim the warm friend- 
ship of the great majority who know him. 

CLARENCE A. BAILEY 

Clarence A. Bailey, a well known resident of Monmouth, connected with the 
Illinois department of finance, was born in Mercer county, this state, January 7, 
1891, a son of George F. and Mary | Steen I Bailey. The father was born in 
Scotland county. Missouri, in 1858 and the mother's birth occurred in Mercer 
county, Illinois, in April, 1869. The former was a locomotive engineer on the 
Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad and he represented an old family from Ken- 
tucky. In politics he was a lifelong democrat and fraternally was affiliated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He passed away in 1929. 

Clarence A. Bailey acquainted himself with the usual branches of learning 
that constitute the public school curriculum in the schools of Monmouth and 
later became a student in the horological department of the Bradley Polytechnic 
Institute at Peoria. He later spent twenty-four years in the jewelry business, 
six years of this period being passed at Foil Wayne, Indiana, while during the 
remainder of the time he carried on business in Monmouth. He had a large and 
well appointed store and supervised his business affairs so carefully and intelli- 
gently that substantial success resulted. 

On the 30th of November, 1913, Mr. Bailey was married to Miss Marie Ryan 
and they became parents of a daughter. Rosemary. Mrs. Bailey passed away in 
1922 and on the 28th of May, 1927, Mr. Bailey married Doris L. Lee. They have 
two children, Martha Lee and George William. 

Mr. Bailey has always taken an active interest in democratic affairs since 
old enough to vote and has been especially active since 1930. He was one of the 
organizers of the Younjr Men's Democratic Club of Warren County and in 1932 



334 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

was elected senatorial committeeman, to which position he was reelected in 1934. 
being chosen during this term of office as chairman of the thirty-second senatorial 
district. Be served for a year and a half as precinct committeeman by appoint- 
ment and was also a member of the executive committee of the county central 
committee during this time. On the Kith of August, 1933, Governor Horner 
appointed him investigator of retailers' occupational tax for District 17 and lie 
is now acting in that capacity. He is an enthusiastic party worker and an 
efficient organizer, and democracy has greatly benefited by his labors. 

HUGH P. RIGNEY 

Hugh P. Rigney, postmaster of Arthur, was horn April 6, 1897, in the 
village where he still resides, his parents being Hugh M. and Ivy (Powell) 
Rigney, who are mentioned elsewhere in this work. His public school training 
was continued until he graduated as a high school pupil of the Arthur township 
high school. In 1917, when he was twenty years of age, he enlisted as a member 
of a machine gun company of the Nineteenth Infantry at Fort Sam Houston, 
near San Antonio. Texas. He was later detached to attend the only machine 
gun school ever conducted in the United States, this being at Camp Hancock. 
Augusta, Georgia. There he was graduated and was immediately made a com- 
pany commander, in which capacity he served until after the war. Out of 
every thousand officers one was eligible to take the oral examination for entrance 
into the regular army, and Mr. Rigney had the distinction of being the one 
chosen. He passed the examination, was transferred to the regular army and 
became an instructor at Petersburg, West Virginia, where he remained until 
March 27, 1919, when he was discharged. 

Mr. Rigney then returned home, and having learned the printer's trade in 
his father's shop in his boyhood days, he became associated with his father 
in business. In 1920 he and his brother, Harold W., bought out the father, who 
was owner of the Arthur Graphic-Clarion, and the following year Hugh P. 
Rigney became sole proprietor of the paper by purchasing his brother's in- 
terest, lie then edited the paper, which was a strict democratic publication, until 
his appointment on the 3rd of May, 1934, to the position of postmaster of Arthur 
by President Roosevelt and is now the incumbent in that office. He has been 
active in democratic politics since reaching the age of twenty-one years and 
has supported the entire ticket through the columns of his paper and through 
personal effort. He has attended various state, congressional and judicial con- 
ventions, both as a delegate and as a visitor, and he served for two terms as 
alderman of Arthur. He has always recognized the duties, obligations and 
responsibilities as well as the opportunities of citizenship, and his labors have 
been along progressive lines, looking ever to the benefit and welfare of the en- 
tire community. 

On February 14, 1922, Mr. Rigney was united in marriage to Miss Alma 
Perrott, a native of Illinois whose people were pioneer settlers of Clay county, 
this state. Mr. and Mrs. Rigney are the parents of three children: Hugh Richard, 
Harold Duane and Mary Jane. 

Mr. Rigney belongs to the Masonic fraternity, to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and to the Methodist Episcopal Church. He also has member- 
ship in the American Legion, in the work of which he takes an active and helpful 
part, now tilling the position of service officer. He has been very active in the 
legislative work of the organization and has sought the adoption of many legis- 
lative measures of benefit to the Legion. His interest in local affairs is manifest 
in his connection with the Chamber of Commerce. He belongs to the Southern 
Illinois Editorial Association, to the Illinois State Press Association, to the 
Democratic Editorial Association, the Illinois State Postmasters Association, to 
the Jeffersonian Club and to the Young Democrats Club of Douglas county, of 
which he is vice-president. He is at all times actuated by a spirit of enterprise 
and advancement and his aid and influence can always be counted upon to fur- 
ther measures for the general good. 




HUGH P. RIGXEY 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 337 

LAWRENCE MARION LINKER 

Lawrence Marion Linker, a member of the Illinois state maintenance pat ml 
anil a resident of Elmira, Stark comity, was born in Arenzville, Illinois, Novem- 
ber 18. 1897, bis parents being Luther M. and Margaret (Epler) Linker. He 
attended the grade scbools of Ashland, Illinois, and of Elmira and then entered 
the high schools of Toulon, from which he was graduated in 1915. He next 
entered Knox College at Galesburg. where he studied for four months. He took 
up farming in the vicinity of Elmira and gave his attention to general agricultural 
pursuits until October. 1933, when he was appointed maintenance patrolman 
for the state highways and is now acting in this capacity. 

On the 3d of May, 1923, in Toulon, Illinois. Mr. Linker was united in mar- 
riage to Gladys Eileen Brady and they are the parents of two children, Kathryn 
and Clifford, aged respectively ten and six years. 

Fraternally Mr. Linker is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America 
and his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian Church. From September 
until December, 1918, lie was a member of the Students Army Training Corps 
at Knox College and he received his honorable discharge in the latter month. 
His father was a democrat and he was reared in that faith, to which he has always 
loyally adhered. He has served as precinct committeeman of Elmira precinct 
since 1931 and he attended the state convention at Springfield as an alternate 
delegate. Never has he hesitated to support his honest convictions and his worth 
as a party worker is widely acknowledged. 



EARLE FUSSELM AN 

Earle Fusselman, of Plainville, Adams county, is a state food inspector. He 
was born in Richfield township, this county, May 22, 1888, his parents being 
Charles F. and Cora Ellen Fusselman. The father was also born in Richfield 
township, his natal day being December 5, 1865, and throughout the greater part 
of his life he followed farming in his native locality. He was also a rural mail 
carrier during the last four years of his life and in politics he was always a stanch 
democrat. He passed away in 1929, having for four years survived his wife, who 
was born in Payson township, Adams county, January 16, 1868, and died in 1925. 

After mastering the branches of learning taught in the rural schools of 
Richfield township, Earle Fusselman attended the high school at Plainville. He 
was a rural mail carrier for four years, from 1912 until 1916, and then established 
a store in Plainville, his connection with mercantile interests of the town cover- 
ing seventeen years. For six and onedialf years during the Wilson administration 
the post office was in his store and Mrs. Fusselman acted as postmaster. For 
three years after his retirement from the mercantile field Mr. Fusselman en- 
gaged in the insurance business and on October 2, 1933, he was appointed state 
food inspector with a territory that covers the four counties of Adams, Hancock. 
Pike and Brown. He is making an excellent record in office and has always been 
a loyal democrat. His service is a credit to his department and his official record 
commends him to the confidence and support of all. When twenty-two years 
of age he was elected precinct committeeman and he has served at intervals 
since that time, having been again elected in 1932 and once more in 1934. During 
the past four years he has been a member of the executive committee of the Adams 
county democratic central committee. He attends practically all of the state 
conventions of his party, either as a delegate or as a visitor, and he has been 
active in civic as well as political affairs. For two years he served as village 
treasurer, for four years as village clerk and for nine years as cleric of Payson 
township. In 1932 he was elected supervisor of Payson township, being the 
first democrat chosen to that position from the township in thirty years. He 
is still a member of the board. The public knows him as a thoroughly conscien- 
tious man, loyal to every duty, and his record has gained for him the highest 
commendation. 



338 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

< »n the 29th of May, 1913, Mr. Fusselman was united in marriage to Nellie 
L. Thompson and they became the parents of two children, Carroll M. and 
Warren E. The religious Eaith of the family is that of the .Methodist Church. 
Mr. Fusselman belongs to the Masonic fraternity and is a past master of Plain- 
ville Lodge, lit- is also connected with the Eagles and with the Elks of Quincy 
and he has been identified with the South Side Loat Club of Quincy. His entire 
life has been passed in Adams county, where he is widely and favorably known 
and where his circle of friends is almost coextensive with the circle of his ac- 
quaintance. 

HERMAN WOLFF 

Among the native sons of Lake county who still reside within its borders 
is numbered Herman Wolff, a well known member of the highway patrol force. 
He was here born on the 13th of December, 1904, his parents being Andrew and 
Eva Wolff. 

After mastering the elementary branches of learning Herman Wolff con- 
tinued his education in the high school at Ant inch. He was reared to the occupa- 
tion of farming, which he continued to follow until he was appointed to his pre- 
sent position as highway maintenance patrolman in February, 1933. He has 
worked diligently in the performance of his duties and has made an excellent 
record by his public service. 

Mr. Wolff proudly east his first vote in support of the candidates named 
on the democratic ticket and has always kept well informed on the questions and 
issues of the day. He has never seen occasion to change his political allegianee 
and has been an earnest party worker. He was elected precinct committeeman 
in 1932 and was again chosen for the office in 1934. lie served as a delegate to 
the democratic state convention in 1932 and also in 1934 and is well known to 
many of the party leaders of Illinois. He belongs to the Lake County Democratic 
Club and willingly assists in its organized efforts to promote party welfare and 
successes. He makes his home at Lake Villa. 



JOHN R. CONNELL 



In the death of John R. Council of "Sit. Carroll, Carroll county, Illinois, on 
the 6th of April, 1934, the democratic party of the state lost one of its most able 
and stanchest adherents, one who at the time of his passing was the democratic 
nominee for county judge and one who for many years had been a foremost 
member of the bar. 

John R. Connell was born February 22, 1873, in Thomson, Carroll county, 
and was a son of Daniel and Joanna (Reagan) Connell, both of whom were 
natives of Ireland. Daniel Connell was himself a loyal and active member of the 
democratic party and for fifty years worked for the Milwaukee Railroad. 

John R. Connell completed his studies in the public schools by graduating 
from the high school in Thomson and then, having decided upon the law as his 
life work, took up his professional studies at the University of Michigan, which 
conferred upon him the Bachelor of Laws degree in 1907. He immediately 
opened an office in Mt. Carroll and was successful from the beginning, having 
acquired a clientele of most satisfying proportions within very short time. He 
was state's attorney from 1918 until 1922, and in 1929 was further honored by 
being made assistant commercial counsel for the New York Central Railroad 
system in the Chicago office. In 1933 he was selected to become the democratic 
candidate for the office of county judge, with success at the polls practically 
assured. However, in Savanna, Illinois, on the 6th of April, while closing a 
political speech he was stricken. His career was one of real usefulness and his 
death was a distinct loss to the party to which he gave his allegiance. 

On October 16, 1905, Mr. Connell was united in marriage to Mrs. Harriett 
i Xase) Noyes, who was born in Mt. Carroll, and is a daughter of Major Adam 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 339 

Nase, who was a major in the Pnion Army during the Civil war. Mrs. Connell 
is a graduate of the Prances Shimer School of Mt. Carroll, and for a period of 
twenty-nine years was associated with her husband in his law office. Likewise she 
was an ardent worker for the democratic party and, after the death of Mr. 
Connell, friends of both of them persuaded her to become the democratic candi- 
date for county judge in his place. She was defeated at the election by the 
republican incumbent by a very narrow margin. Mrs. Connell was reared in 
the tenets of the republican party, but during the 1932 campaign she became a 
democrat, and is now regarded as one of the foremost women leaders of the 
party in Carroll County. Mr. Connell himself, during a portion of his life, was 
active in republican affairs of the county, but with the advent of the new deal, 
his great admiration for President Roosevelt, and the success of the democratic 
party, firmly believing in its value to the country, he changed his political 
allegiance. 



CHESTER LEO HOLLEMBACK 

Chester Leo Ilollemback, a resident of Keithsburg who is serving as highway 
maintenance patrolman, was born in Mercer county, Illinois, "December 28, 1890, 
ami is a son of II. II. and Mabel (Chamberlin) Hollemback. The father is now 
deceased, but the mother is living. II. II. Ilollemback was a harness maker at 
the arsenal at Rock Island for a number of years and in politics was an active 
democrat. 

Chester L. Ilollemback pursued his education in the Aledo high school and 
when his textboks were put aside turned his attention to the occupation of farm- 
ing, which he has followed until recently. In February, 1933, he was appointed a 
member of the highway maintenance patrol and is now serving for the second year 
in this position. He has always been an unfaltering supporter of the democratic 
party and utilizes every opportunity to further its victories. 

In 1915 Mr. Ilollemback was united in marriage to Miss Ruth Edgington 
and to them have been born five children, as follows : Leo, who is a graduate of 
the Keithsburg high school ; Richard ; Don W. ; Anna May ; and Robert L. Mrs. 
Hollemback is a member of the Catholic Church, while Mr. Hollemback holds 
membership in the Presbyterian Church. Like her husband, she is much inter- 
ested in the success of democracy and is now chairman of the Mercer County 
Women's Democratic Organization, which position she has filled since it was 
formed. L. C. Hollemback, an uncle of our subject, is a committeeman at Mon- 
mouth, and his mother is a committeewoman at Aledo. The family is thus 
closely identified with democratic activity in this section of the state, its various 
members having been called to positions of leadership in connection with the 
work of directing the destinies of democracv in Illinois. 



DANIEL II. DESMOND 

Daniel H. Desmond is the efficient postmaster of Woodstock and is also 
connected with agricultural interests in McHenry county. He was born March 
21, 1882, on the farm where he still lives in Hartland township, McHenry 
county, his parents being William and Margaret (Nolan) Desmond, the latter 
born in 1848. The father was born in 1819, on the farm where his son Daniel 
now resides, and in the acquirement of an education attended the public schools 
of Hartland township and the high school of Harvard, from which he was 
graduated. In young manhood he took up teaching, which he followed for ten 
or fifteen years in McHenry county. He then concentrated his attention upon 
farming throughout the remained of his active career. During the last twenty- 
four years of his life he and Mrs. Desmond made their home in Woodstock, 
where he passed away October 14, 1934, and where his widow still resides. 
William Desmond was always a very prominent and outstanding figure in the 
public life of the community and was ever a stalwart advocate of the principles 
of the democratic party. He served on the board of review of McHenry county 



340 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

for more than thirty years, cither as ;i member thereof or as secretary of the 
board, and in 1900 was elected to the state legislature, proving an able member 
of the house. He belonged to the Catholic Church and also to the Foresters. 

His son. Daniel H. Desmond, attended the public schools of Hartland town- 
ship and then entered the high school at Woodstock, from which he was graduated 
in 1111)0. He taught school for a year and since that lime has engaged in farming, 
carefully and systematically tilling the soil, from which he produces excellent 
crops, 

On the 8th of October, 1911, .Mr. Desmond was united in marriage to Miss 
Maude Hayes and they are the parents of four children, namely: Lyle, Rose 
Mary. Lucille and Daniel II., Jr. The family are communicants of the Catholic 
Church. Mr. Desmond has always voted with the democratic party and has 
ever been an active worker in its ranks. In 1926 he was elected precinct com- 
mitteeman and has been re-elected at each biennial period since that time, being 
chosen secretary of the committee in 1!):>4. His efforts as a party worker and 
organizer have been most efficient and he well deserved the appointment which 
came to him October 1"), 1934, making him acting postmaster of Woodstock. He 
took charge of the office on the 1st of November. His wife has been committee- 
woman of her precinct and has always been active in party affairs. They are 
widely and favorably known in McIIenry county, where they rank high both 
socially find as citizens. 



H. A. FOSTER 



Experience proves that the best educated men are those who have to fight 
for each educational opportunity. The boy who is given every advantage tor 
acquiring an excellent education does not appreciate his opportunities or take 
advantage of them as does the boy who can only obtain them through hard 
work and privations. The pioneer boy of four score years ago had little or no 
chance to gain more than the most primitive of educations. Schools were very 
few in number, and poor in quality, and yet the men who have developed from 
these boys, rank easily among the best infonned men of the land. 

In 1854, on the 2d of September, there was born to George B. and Martha 
(Jones) Foster, a son, Henry A. Foster, in Oswego township, Livingston county. 
Illinois. George Foster was born in Tioga county, New York, August 17. 1824, 
and came to Livingston county in 1888. Martha Jones was born in Indiana. 
February 25, 1834, and came to Oswego township, this county, in 1846. They 
were pioneers in Oswego township after their marriage, and their son, Henry 
A., lived the life of most pioneer boys, working hard on the farm and securing 
what education lay within his power. For pleasure, he went hunting and 
fishing, and enjoyed himself at both pursuits, although he always worried 
because he was not becoming better educated. 

At the age of eighteen years, he came to the conclusion that an educated 
farmer was likely to succeed better than an uneducated one, even if he cared 
to remain on the farm ; and so he bent all his efforts toward securing a teacher's 
certificate, and as soon as this was accomplished, began teaching. Every penny 
was carefully hoarded, so that he might study in higher schools. As soon as 
he was able, he entered the Northern Indiana Normal, and attended several 
terms, and once more resumed his teaching to earn more money for his studies, 
finally finishing, after eight years of alternate studying and teaching, in the 
Lincoln University, in Lincoln, Illinois, in 1880. His first school was a rural 
one, but at the close of his work in Lincoln, he taught in Reading township, for 
one year in Ancona, and then for a period of six years in Pontiac — three years 
in the grammar grade and three years as principal of the high school. At the 
expiration of that period, he thought the matter over carefully and decided 
that the profession of teaching was the most poorly paid for the money invested 
in long training, so he resigned his position in the Pontiac schools. He was 
offered and accepted the job of auditing the books at the reformatory. That 




H. A. FOSTER 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 343 

finished, he finally decided to engage in the electric lighting business, then in 
its infancy. In April, 1889, he began the electric plant at Pontiac, and in 1890, 
when the plant had been firmly established, the work on the plant at Fairbury 
was begun. Later, Forrest was added to Fairbury, and the system developed Oor 
the two places was not exeeeded by any for efficiency. 

In 1890 Mr. Foster was again called to work in the educational field by 
virtue of being nominated and elected comity superintendent of schools of 
Livingston. He ran on the democratic ticket. It now became Mr. Foster's 
duty to carry on both electrical and educational duties concurrently. This he 
accomplished successfully. It may not be amiss in this connection to remark 
that the school work was in a chaotic condition when he was elected county 
superintendent — no worse than generally prevailed in other counties, hut there 
was no system. He decided that systemization should begin at once. His prede- 
cessors, Matthew Tombaugh and (i. W. Ferris tried it and did not succeed and he 
was warned it could not be accomplished. He determined he could bring order 
out of chaos, so took the matter direcetly to the people, pleading for their 
support, and promising one hundred percent more efficient schools if they would 
give him uniform books for the county. Strenuous times were on in school 
circles. Township after township was told the benefits to be derived from the 
superintendent's program, which was as follows: 

(1) A uniform system of text books. (2) A course of study. (3) Monthly 
and term reports from teachers. (4) Monthly and term examinations of district 
schools. (5) The education of the teachers — how to use his course of study and 
conduct the examinations. (6) The annual issuance of county diplomas and 
holding of graduation exercises for the country schools. He boldly announced 
his plan and determination, and, through the medium of township meetings, 
presented the matter to the people for their approval, and, the wonder of it 
all, secured it. The people having chosen their delegates to the county con- 
vention to consider the matter and seled the books, instructed each delegate, 
if he found himself in the minority at any time, to change his vote to the 
majority, thus making the action of the convention unanimous. 

Thus a uniform system w r as provided, the books chosen, terms arranged, 
and the day set — December 1, 1891 — when the exchange should be made. The 
people did not wait for the directors to sign contracts, but changed anyway. 
Thus, in ten days the exchange was effected, and school books were uniform in 
Livingston county. 

It was now up to the county superintendent to make good. Institutes were 
called and careful papers prepared, instructing teachers how to use the new 
books. These papers were published in one of the county papers and freely 
distributed to teachers and directors. All this was ably seconded by "The 
School News,"' a monthly publication issued from the superintendent's office. 
Then came the building of the course of study, which was placed in the teachers' 
hands in August, 1892. The teachers were now plainly told their fitness to 
teach would be measured by their success in using the course of study, holding 
examinations and making prompt report to the superintendent. Thus was a 
long forward step taken — a step that riveted the eyes of the entire state on 
Livingston county. The superintendent was ably supported by the following 
persons, as well as by a host not mentioned: C. R. Tombaugh, C. M. Hamilton 
(assistant county superintendent), C. E. Slaughbaugh, C. E. DeButts, Margaret 
Powell, J. B. Hangs, Ada Peart. Amanda Hubbard and the entire county press. 
Everything worked out as planned, and the success was more complete than 
the most ardent had hoped for. Mr. Tombaugh succeeded .Mr. Foster and he 
ably carried on the work, thus firmly established. 

Returning to his electrical activities, we refer briefly to the fact thai .Mr. 
Foster's station at Fairbury was the first generating station in the United 
States to serve current to a distant town. The venture was so successful that 
the electrical press of the nation gave much space to this innovation. Soon 
combinations were formed, current produced at a much lower figure to con- 



344 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

sumers. Mr. Poster was elected presidenl of the Illinois Electrical Association 
in 1911, and in the following year he brought about the formation of the Central 
Illinois Public Utilities Company, which was later taken over by the Central 
Illinois Public Service ( 'onipany. 

In November, 1912, Mr. Foster was elected to the forty-eighth general 
assembly, in which session he did outstanding work. He was responsible for 
pulling the woman's suffrage bill out of the bands of a committee and piloted 
it through the house to passage. At the close of the session in 1913, .Air. 
Poster lefl for his rice farm in Arkansas and for the next five years devoted his 
time to thai industry. In 1920, having sold his southern interests, be returned 
to bis home in Pairhury to live a life of retirement. Notwithstanding his many 
business interests, Mr. Foster has always found time for the manifestation of 
a proper public spirit, and he has always been in the foremost ranks of those 
who have been active in promoting the welfare of the various communities in 
which he has lived. A Democrat, and a member of the party because it advocates 
a low tariff and those principles are in accordance with Mr. Foster's own views. 

On the first of September, 1892, Mr. Foster was united in marriage to Miss 
Ada iM. Peart of Braidwood, Illinois, and they became the parents of two 
sons : George Peart, born in 1896, who is now purchasing agent for the Sinclair 
Refining Company in the northeastern division of the United States, with head- 
quarters in New York City, and Henry Hamilton, who is associated with the 
firm of Hart, Schaffner & Marx, Chicago. 

A. B. Foster, a nephew of H. A. Foster, was born in Pairbury, Livingston 
county, Illinois, December 25, 1896, a son of N. J. and Sarah (Van Dorn) Foster, 
also natives of this state. N. J. Foster, an electrician, and H. A. Foster, built 
the first electric plant in Pairbury in 1890. A. B. Foster attended the public 
schools of his native city until he graduated from the Fairbury high school 
and then entered the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. At the time of the World 
war, he spent one year overseas as a member of the One Hundred and Twenty- 
ninth Infantry Machine Gun Company, Thirty-third Division, with which he 
participated in three major offensives and one major defensive. He was gassed 
in the service and was honorably discharged in June, 1919. He has since been 
an active member of the American Legion and has attended several of its 
state ami national conventions. After leaving the army, he conducted a garage 
in Fairbury in association with his father for three years, then the business 
was sold. Since that time he has devoted his attention to commercial art and 
and advertising in Fairbury with merited success. Aside from his business 
activities, he has followed in the political footsteps of his father and his uncle, 
succeeding the latter as a member of the democratic county committee in 1932. 
At present he is holding the position of auto investigator in the automobile 
department of the secretary of state. He was also a delegate to the judicial 
conventions in Champaign and Bloomington, Illinois. 

In 1921, Mr. Foster married Miss Mildred Compton. of Fairbury, Illinois, 
and they are the parents of a daughter, Barbara, twelve years of age. 



JOSEPH EDWARD HARTMAN 

Joseph Edward Hartman, of Batavia, is one of the state's employes, serving 
as a highway helper. He was born April 28, 1903, in the city in which he yet 
makes his home, his parents being John and Anna Hartman, who are now resi- 
dents of Aurora. Illinois, to which place they removed dur'ng the early boyhood 
of their son Joseph, who there attended the granimer schools. After completing 
his education he worked on the railroad, also engaged in highway construction 
and worked at the building trade. He likewise at one time occupied a position 
in connection with a golf course and then took up the occupation of farming, 
making a specialty of truck gardening. He has likewise done landscaping, has 
engaged in peddling milk and has carried on business as a teaming contractor. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 345 

He has thus led a very busy, useful and active life, working diligently to advance 
his interests along legitimate lines. On the 1st of April, 1933, he was made a 
highway maintenance helper, receiving appointment to this position by reason 
of his affiliation with the democratic party, with which he has voted since age 
conferred upon him the right of franchise. 

In 1926 Mr. Hartman was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Sesselmann 
and they are the parents of four children, as follows: Eugene, Charles, Nicholas 
and William. The family attends the Catholic Church and Mr. Hartman is 
identified fraternally with the Loyal Order of Moose. His entire life has been 
passed in Batavia and vicinity, where he is well known. 



JOSEPH A. NAGEL 

Joseph A. Nagel, of West Chicago, who has been connected with the highway 
niiiintenance department since May 2, 1934, was born in the city where he still 
lives, March 23, 1908, a son of Theodore and Mary (Dieter) Nagel. At the usual 
age he attended the public schools of West Chicago and in 1927, when a youth of 
nineteen years, entered the employ of the Chicago & North Western Railway as 
a freight brakeman. He remained in the railroad service for five years. 

In 1932 Mr. Nagel began taking an interest in local democratic affairs and 
in April, 1934, was elected precinct committeeman and as such is active in party 
work. His appointment to his present position came to him in May, 1934, and 
was a merited reward for loyal political service. Mr. Nagel is a member of the 
Catholic Church and also belongs to the Knig'hts of Columbus. 



MRS. NELLIE (GOCGII) STEWART 

Mrs. Nellie (Cough) Stewart is holding the responsible position of assistant 
superintendent of the Illinois State Reformatory for Girls at Dwight, and by 
reason of what she has accomplished in this connection, as well as by reason of 
her service in behalf of democracy, she is entitled to representation in this work. 
Her father, Edward Gough, was born in England and on coming to the United 
States settled in Jacksonville, Morgan county, Illinois, where he had a sister 
living. He afterward removed to Waverly, where he resided until about 1906, 
when he established his home in Girard, Illinois, but subsequently returned to 
Waverly, where he passed away in 1923. In young manhood he engaged in the 
butchering business and later followed farming, while subsequently he became 
proprietor of a hotel and so continued until his death. His wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Florence Ashbaugh, was born on a farm near Waverly. They 
were married April 14, 1881, and became parents of two children, but one died 
in infancy. 

Their daughter Nellie attended the public schools of Waverly, passing 
through consecutive grades to the high school. On the 31st of December, 1908, 
she became the wife of Dr. Frank A. Stewart, a dentist of Waverly, who was 
born on a farm near Pawnee, Illinois, a son of T. A. and Maria L. (Colean) 
Stewart. He was educated in the grade and high schools of Springfield, Illinois, 
and in the Chicago College of Dentistry, from which he was graduated in 1905. 
He afterward practiced for a year in Virden, Illinois, and then removed to 
Girard, where he still follows his profession. During the World war he enlisted 
in the Dental Corps at Springfield and was called for action May 16, 1918. He 
left for duty ten days later at Camp Sherman, near Chillicothe, Ohio, and served 
there for six months with the rank of first lieutenant, after which he was trans- 
ferred to Fort McIIenry, Baltimore, Maryland, where he remained until October 
31, 1919, when he was mustered out. He now holds the rank of major in the 
Reserves of his home city. 

Dr. Stewart has always been keenly interested in politics and has served as 
a member of the county committee for eighteen years and on the executive com- 
mittee for a number of vears. He is now a member of the fiftv-eighth general 



::tii ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

assembly of Illinois as representative from the thirty-eighth district, having 
been elected in 1932. From the time that the franchise was conferred upon women 
.Mrs. Stewart lias also been an active party worker and has served as committee- 
man in her precinct, and for eight years has been county chairman of the demo- 
cratic women of Macoupin county. In December, 1!).'!:'., she was appointed to 
her present position as assistant superintendent of the Illinois State Reformatory 
for Girls at Dwight. She has a firm belief that personal contact is a most potenl 
element in political work and has accomplished much by her efforts in that 
connect ion. 

Dr. and Mrs. Stewart, prompted by a broad humanitarian purpose, took two 
girls into their home whom they reared and educated. Mrs. Stewart has alwavs 
been very active in the Legion Auxiliary and was president of the Girard unit for 
four years, while for one year she was county president and for two years was 
district chaplain. She is a member of the Methodist Church of Girard, belongs 
to the Eastern Star and has always been active in everything of a civic nature 
pertaining to the welfare and upbuilding of her community. During the World 
war she was a very earnest worker in the Red Cross. The Doctor is a thirty- 
second degree Mason and for two years served as master of the blue lodge at 
Girard, while for a similar period he was high high priest of the chapter. He was 
also president of the Chamber of Commerce, and both Dr. and Mrs. Stewart are 
members of the Oak Leaf Country Club at Girard. They are in entire harmony 
in their activities for the benefit of the individual or for the advancement of 
community welfare as well as in their political ideals. They occupy an enviable 
social position and are numbered among the leading and representative people 
of their part of the state. 

L. L. BOYLE 

L. L. Doyle, acting postmaster of Roberts, has been a member of the demo- 
cratic county committee of Ford county during the past eighteen years and 
its chairman since 1932. He was born in Shenandoah, Iowa, September 17, 
1872, his parents being Daniel and Lizzie (Burns) Boyle, who removed to 
Roberts, Illinois, in 1878. Daniel Boyle, a farmer and drayman, was a lifelong 
supporter of the democratic party and held a number of local offices in the 
village of Roberts. His wife is still living in Roberts at the age of seventy- 
nine years and is well known and highly esteemed throughout the community. 

L. L. Boyle, who was six years of age when he came with his parents to 
Roberts, Illinois, here acquired his education in the public schools and has 
remained a resident of the community to the present time. In young manhood 
he learned the barber trade, which he followed in Roberts for several years. 
He was afterward engaged in business as a stockman for many years, breeding 
line studs, and he also conducted a general mercantile establishment and a 
meat market in Roberts. Aside from his business activities he has been an 
efficient public servant and a leader in the local ranks of the democratic party. 
He has served as assessor of Lyman township for the past eight years, has 
been a member of the township board for five years and was tax collector of 
Lyman township for one term. He was appointed postmaster of Roberts by 
President "Wilson in 1016, thus serving until 1922, and in March, 1934, again 
received appointment to the position of acting postmaster, which he is now- 
filling. Since 1916 he has been a member of the democratic county committee, 
of which he has served as chairman since 1932. He was a delegate to the state 
convention at Springfield, in 1924, when Norman L. Jones received the demo- 
cratic nomination for governor, and he served on the senatorial committee for 
one year. He is affiiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America and enjoys 
high standing in fraternal and social as well as political circles of Ford county 
and this part of the state. 

In 1914 Mr. Boyle married Naomi Newman, who passed away leaving 
a son. Rovce. now emploved in the welfare department at the state Capitol. 
Tn 1926 Mr. Bovle married Mrs. Minnie Resting Carr. 




L. L. BOYLE 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 349 

EUGENE V. FARRELL 

Eugene V. Farrell, a veteran of the World war and now connected with the 
board of health of Peoria, has ever been keenly interested in all that makes for 
good citizenship and for public progress. Born at Monett, Missouri, June 7. 
1895, he is a son of Lee and Nancy (Manning) Farrell, the former a native of 
Carbondale, Illinois, and the latter of Virginia. The ancestry can be traced 
back to the Old Dominion, where representatives of the family enlisted for 
service in the Revolutionary war. James Farrell, the paternal grandfather 
of Eugene V. Farrell, was a veteran of the Civil war and for many years was 
a preacher of the Christian Church in southern Illinois, devoting his life to the 
work of the gospel. His son, Lee Farrell, became a general contractor, follow- 
ing the business in Peoria and in Texas. He wedded Nancy Manning and their 
family numbered two children, but their son, Earl G., is now deceased. 

Eugene V. Farrell, the surviving son, completed his education in St. Basil 
College in Waco, Texas, where he studied literature, Latin and Greek. Coming 
to Peoria, Illinois, he was here associated with his father in the contracting 
business, but at the time of the World war he entered the military service of 
his country and was sent to Camp Logan. Later he went overseas, where he 
participated in the hotly contested engagements of St. Mih'iel, the Argonne and 
the Meuse. Following the signing of the armistice he returned to the United 
States and was mustered out at Camp Grant, June 8, 1919. Later he was em- 
ployed as a salesman by various oil companies, so continuing until he was ap- 
pointed milk inspector in the department of public health by Mayor O'Brien and 
has since served in this position. 

In early manhood Mr. Farrell was united in marriage to Marie Von Seeger, 
of Elgin, Illinois, and they are the parents of two children, Robert and Kathleen. 
In polities Mr. Farrell is keenly interested and is especially active in the party 
work of the fifth ward. He never neglects an opportunity to aid in the ad- 
vancement of democracy and to further every project that has to do with pro- 
gressive citizenship in Peoria. 



CONRAD C. MILLER 

On the 5th of July, 1934, Conrad C. Miller received his commission as post- 
master of Chadwiek and has been in charge of the office since the 1st of February 
of the same year. Carroll county numbers him among her native sons, his birth 
having occurred in Fairhaven township, February 9, 1880. His father, Conrad 
G. Miller, was a native of Germany and died in 1884. The mother, who lion' 
the maiden name of Caroline Hoffman, was born in Jo Daviess county. Illinois, 
and passed away in Chadwiek in 1917. 

Conrad C. Miller attended the rural schools of Fairhaven township and 
continued his education in the high school of Chadwiek, being numbered among 
its alumni of 1898. When his school days were over he learned the carpenter's 
trade, which he followed until 1915, when he was appointed postmaster of 
Chadwiek, filling the office continuously until 1922. For the past seven years 
he has been engaged in the insurance business, being agent for several of the 
old-line companies. Then he was again called to the office of postmaster, being 
appointed acting postmaster on the 1st of February, 1934, and receiving his 
commission on the 5th of July. He brought to the duties of the position the 
benefit of previous experience and his record in office is worthy of all commen- 
dation. 

On the 12th of June, 1906, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Marie X. 
Geisz and they are the parents of three sons, namely: Leo B., who is connected 
with the Dixon National Bank of Dixon, Illinois; Eugene ('.. an attendant at 
the Dixon State Hospital; and Arthur ('.. at home. 

Mr. Miller never fails to manifest his political preference at the polls ami 
has long been recognized as an active party worker. He has served at various 



350 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

Tillies, for at least ten years, as a member of the democratic central committee 
of Can-nil county. For lour years he was village treasurer of Chadwick ami 
for two terms a member of the village council. For one term he served as 
village clerk and has made an excellent official record in all of these capacities. 
Hi' is a member of Chadwick Lodge, No. 857, A. F. & A. M., in which he has 

1 n active, advancing to bul no1 through the office of master of the lodge, and 

lie belongs to the chapter at Atlanta. He is also a member of the Modern Wood- 
men of America. The family are members of the Lutheran Church. There 
has been nothing spectacular in his career and his entire life has been passed in 
Carroll county, where he lias a large circle of warm friends. 



PRANK W. KRAUSE 

(•'or more than a third of a century Frank \V. Krause has been working for 
the democratic party because of a linn belief in its principles. Making his home 
in Elmhurst, he is now serving as a member of the highway maintenance police 
force and cont'nues his work for democracy as a member of the county central 
committee, lie was horn in Baltimore, Maryland, July 2'-), 1883, a son of William 
Krause, deceased. The father was a lifelong democrat, active during his time 
in his ward in Baltimore. In 1891 he removed to Illinois and spent the remainder 
of his days in Elmhurst. 

His son, Frank W. Krause. attended the public schools of Elmhurst and 
after his textbooks were put aside spoil ten years as ;i clerk in a general store. 
He next became cashier for the Chicago & North Western Railway at Elmhurst. 
continuing in the position for seven years. The succeeding twelve years he spent 
in the employ of the Elinhurst-Cliicago Stone Company. 

Mr. Krause has also been a democrat and his study of political conditions 
and problems confirms his belief in the party. In 1900 he was elected precinct 
committeeman and with the exception of two terms he has sTved on the county 
central committee since that date and never was defeated when a candidate for 
the office. In February, 1933, he was appointed highway maintenance patrol- 
man and has since served. He makes his home with his mother in Elmhurst, 
where he has spent the greater part of his life and where he is well known, having 
many friends here. 

HARRY GUY WALTON 

Harry Guy Walton, master mechanic at the Illinois State Farm at Yandalia, 
lias held various important positions to which he has been entitled by reason of 
his well developed powers in the field of engineering and construction. His entire 
life has been passed at Vandalia. where he was horn October 12, 18!)."). a son of 
Joseph Willard and Lucinda (Morton) Walton. His grandfather in the paternal 
line was ;i soldier with the Union forces in the Civil war. Joseph W. Walton was 
an ardent democrat of the Jeffersonian type, and while he never held political 
office or desired political preferment, he was called the wheel horse of his party 
in Ins precinct and county. 

The public schools of Vandalia accorded Harry Guy Walton his educational 
opportunities and when he had completed the work of the <jrades he spent one 
year as a high school pupil. Tn young manhood he took up the study of engineer- 
ing and fitted himself for the position of city engineer, to which he was appointed 
in 1921, serving in that capacity for six years. He then accepted a position as 
engineer with the Illinois Power & Light Company in Vandalia and held the 
job for about a year, when he resigned in order to enter the contractin»' business 
on his own account. In this he was actuated by a laudable ambition and he soon 
developed a suhstantial business to which he devoted his time and energies imtil 
made master mechanic at the Illinois State Farm at Yandalia on the 1st of 
March, 1933. 

There is an interesting military chapter in the life record of Mr. Walton, 
who in earlv manhood enlisted in the Illinois National Guard. When the country 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 351 

became involved in the great World war he offered his services in 1917 and after 
brief training- was sent to France, being a member of Company I, Illinois Volun- 
teers. Later he was transferred to a supply company and saw active service on 
five battlefields — the Meuse-Argonne, Verdun, Trionne, Alvers and St. Mihiel. He 
was discharged in 1918 and became a member of the army of occupation in 
Luxembourg. He belongs to the Veterans of Foreign Wars and to the American 
Legion. 

On the 20th of January, 1918, in Vandalia, Illinois, Mr. Walton was united 
in marriage to Miss Rohima Squibb and they have two children, Harry G., Jr., 
and Katherine Clair. The parents are members of the Christian Church. Mr. 
Walton always votes with the democratic party and has attended several of the 
county conventions. In all matters of citizenship he is as true and loyal to the 
best interests of community, commonwealth and country as he was when he 
followed the stars and stripes to the battlefield of France. 



THOMAS WILLIAM GUBBINS 

Thomas William Gubbins is one of the state maintenance patrolmen, having 
been appointed in February, 1933. He makes his home at Wyoming, Stark 
county, and has always been a resident of Illinois, his birth' having occurred at 
Campgrove, in Marshall count}*, June 16, 1887. His parents were Joseph W. 
and Mary (Blackburn) Gubbins, both of whom gave political support to the 
democratic party. The father is now deceased. 

Thomas W. Gubbins acquired his education in the public schools of his 
native county and throughout his entire life he has given considerable attention 
to farming. He owns and operates a farm in Marshall county and has brought 
his fields under a high state of cultivation. For eight years he engaged in the 
hardware business, continuing to conduct his store until 1926. From 1928 until 
1932 he had a Standard Oil station at Wyoming and since February, 1933, he 
has served as state maintenance patrolman, the duties of which office claim much 
of his time and attention. 

On the 21st of November, 1906, at Campgrove, Illinois, Mr. Gubbins was 
united in marriage to Miss Margaret Moran and they are the parents of a daughter 
and a son, Mary Darlene and Paul Robert, aged respectively twenty-five and 
seventeen years. The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic Church. 
Mr. Gubbins is well known throughout the section of the state wdiere he has always 
lived and where his activities and interests have ever been of a character that have 
won for him the respect and goodwill of his fellow townsmen. 



MRS. HARRIET J. SUMMERS 

Mrs. Harriet J. Summers, probation officer at East St. Louis, was born in 
Chicago, Illinois, a daughter of Derick and Elizabeth (Kingdon) Janse. Her 
father was born in the state of New York and was of Holland descent. He 
removed with his family to East St. Louis when his daughter Harriet was tw r elve 
years of age and here became connected with the packing industry. He was 
also a w^ell known figure in political circles, always supporting the democratic 
party, and he served on the county board of supervisors and as public weigh- 
master in East St. Louis, where he was well and favorably known. His wife 
was a native of England. 

Attending the public schools of East St. Louis, Harriet Janse in due time 
was graduated from the high school and in young womanhood became the wife 
of Cornelius A. Summers, who spent the greater part of his life in this city. 
He was in the sheet metal business. He was also an active democrat and he 
served for two terms as county recorder of St. Clair county, while for one 
term he was tax collector of Centerville township. He also acted as superin- 
tendent of the special assessment of East St. Louis and he served for many years 
as a member of the county committee and managed the county campaigns on 
various occasions, his intelligently directed effort and powers of organization 



352 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

enabling him to do most effective work in winning democratic victories. He 
passed away in November, 1927. 

Mrs. Summers has been very active in political affairs since 1912, when 
slie wits made secretary of the Woodrow Wilson Club. In 1928 she was ap- 
pointed deputy county recorder under Walter Flannigen and served for three 
years, or until 1930, when she was appointed probation officer of St. Clair 
county by Judge Paul Farthing. In this position she has since continued. 
covering an incumbency of four years. In 1932 she was one of the organizers 
of the Easl St. Louis Democratic Women's Club and became its vice president, 
mi remaining until l!i:>4, when she was elected president. 

Mrs. Summers is the mother of a son and a daughter, Archie and Eleanor, 
the latter the wife of William Thompson of East St. Louis. Loth Archie 
Summers and William Thompson are democratic precinct committeemen. Mrs. 
Summers belongs to the Order of the Eastern Star and she is an active and 
faithful member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, in the work of which she 
is helpfully interested. 

.MRS. ROSE .MOSS SCOTT 

Mrs Rose .Moss Scott, living on the Willrose Farm near Chrisman and a well 
known representative of agricultural interests in Edgar county, was born near 
Paris, Illinois, December 3, 1869, a daughter of John and Nancy (Sousley) Moss. 
Her father was born in Fleming county, Kentucky, and in young manhood 
came to Illinois, settling upon a farm near Paris, Edgar county, in 1S52. Here 
he prospered by reason of his capable management and business ability and be- 
came a worthwhile business man, a farmer and cattle man. owning several 
hundred acres of land. He was closely associated not only with the agricultural 
but with the political and moral development of the county throughout his re- 
maining days. In 1869 he was elected the first democratic county treasurer 
after the war. Keenly interested in politics, he worked untiringly for the party. 
He was a member of the first town council of Chrisman ami served for six years, 
and served as trustee for ten years, lie was supervisor from Ross township in 
1874 and was elected mayor of Chrisman in 1889, and during his term of office 
the principal streets were gravelled, which was quite a change from the mud 
streets. John Moss was prominent in the councils of his party and frequently 
was sent as a delegate to the various conventions. He was a member of the 
building committee of the schoolhouse erected in Chrisman in the year 1S77. and 
for fifteen years served on the school board. He was a loyal member of the 
Presbyterian Church, served as one of its elders for several years and was on 
the building committee when its first house of worship was erected. He died 
in 1915, while his wife, who was born in Kentucky and lived there until her 
marriage in 1867, departed this life in 191 (i. 

Their daughter. Rose Moss, acquired her early education in the grammar 
and high schools of Chrisman and then attended a private school. In 1894 she 
became the bride of William T. Scott, a sou of .lames T. and Mary E. I Ryan - 
Scott, who were natives of Ohio and became pioneer farming people of Edgar 
county. William T. Scott was educated in the Chrisman schools and has always 
engaged in farming, having for the past eighteen years had charge of the Epps 
farms, comprising several farming properties in Edgar county, which he wisely 
and profitably manages. lie is very active in civic affairs and is interested in 
all that pertains to general welfare and improvement. 

Mr. and Mrs. Scott have one son, John Robert, who is a graduate of the 
Chrisman high school and attended I)e Pauw University at Greencastle, Indiana, 
until he entered the World war. In 1917 he enlisted in Company of the Fifty- 
ninth Infantry of the Fourth Division and went overseas. He was in the St. 
Mihiel drive and for several months was in a hospital, receiving his discharge at 
Camp Grant on the 6th of February. 1919. He is now operating his father's 
farm. 




MRS. ROSE Moss SCOTT 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 355 

Mrs. Scott has been a stanch believer in the democratic party from her girl- 
hood days to the present time and has been an active party worker since 1922, 
participating: in every campaign. She does her work quietly and is not a member 
of any committee but wields a considerable influence among those who know 
her. In the Daughters of the American Revolution she holds membership and 
was state historian from 1827 until 1929, during which time she compiled a his- 
tory of The Daughters of the American Revolution of Illinois, for which work 
she has been highly complimented by people from all over the state. She has 
also compiled a history of the Moss family which has been published and she is 
well known as a writer of both prose and poetry, which is published in various 
magazines of the United States and England. She belongs to the League of 
American Penwomen and to the Sons and Daughters of Pilgrims, and in connec- 
tion with the latter she has edited and published the News Letter. She also 
has membership in the Huguenot Society of Pennsylvania, Mayflower Society, 
Daughters of the American Colonists, Founders and Patriots of America, and 
the Daughters of 1812. She is a member of the Presbyterian Church, in which 
she is an active worker, having for sixteen years taught the ladies' Bible class. 
She studied writing privately after her marriage and her ability and talent 
along this line have made her widely known. After completing the high school 
course in Chrisman, she took a four years' course in literature and art, later 
completing the Delphian course of six years, 1922 to 1928 inclusive. In 1927 she 
published a book of poems — ' ' Back Home. ' ' 

Mr. Scott and his son are members of the Masonic fraternity and of the 
Mystic Shrine, and the family is prominent socially. 

ANDREW J. HUGHES 

Andrew J. Hughes, a resident of Villa Park since 1926 and now serving as 
a highway maintenance patrolman, was born in Pittston, Pennsylvania, January 
18, 1887, his parents being Owen and Mary Hughes. The father died in 1888 
but the mother still makes her home in Chicago, to which city she removed 
following her husband's death. 

Andrew J. Hughes was at that time a very young child and at the usual age 
he entered the public schools, being graduated in due time from the McLaren 
grammar school. In 1926 he removed to Du Page county, settling in Villa Park, 
where he has since made his home, and since 1928 he has taken an active part in 
local democratic affairs, working consistently and effectively for the party. In 
1932 he was elected precinct committeeman and was re-elected in 1934, so that 
he is now a member of the county central committee and aids in shaping the 
policies and guiding the destiny of the party in Du Page county. On the 18th 
of November, 1933, he was appointed highway maintenance patrolman of Section 
109, District 64, and is now acceptably filling this position. 

Mr. Hughes married Mamie Lennon and they have a family of eight children. 
Their religious faith is that of the Catholic Church. 



JOHN ENDRES 



Among the public officials of Peoria is numbered John Endres, who is 
now food inspector of the board of health of the city. This is a position of 
much importance and responsibility and he measures up to the highest standards 
of service. Mr. Endres was born in Peoria, October 24, 1894, a son of Michael 
and Yetta (Baer) Endres, both of whom are natives of Germany and for many 
years have been esteemed and useful residents of this city. Michael Endres is 
particularly well known in Peoria and to thousands of persons who have 
visited here, for more than forty years ago he established the Endres Hotel, 
noted for its air of hospitality and its fine old German cooking. In fact it is 
one of the real institutions of Peoria and its proprieter is a most popular citizen. 
To him and his wife were born five children, namely : John, Hubert, Anna, 
Matilda and Lillian. 



356 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

John Bndres acquired ;i public school education and then became the 
active assistanl of liis father, with whom he lias been associated in the hotel 
business for a number of years. They have made theirs a most dehghtiul 
hostelry, ever carefully Looking after the comfort of then' guests, arm many 
there are who have come to them again and again on visits to Peoria. John 
Endres served for fifteen months in the World war, holding the rank of 
second lieutenant, and his lirothcr, Hubert, is also a veteran of thai conflict, 
having been a member of a hospital unit. He is a musician by profession and 
was connected with the famous Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra for some time 
hut is now a member of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, one of the outstand- 
ing musical organizations of the country. 

In early manhood Mr. Endres was united in marriage to Miss Veda Tre- 
uiont Schneider, daughter of Virgil and Lois Schneider, and they are the 
parents of a daughter, Lois Joanne. Mr. Endres belongs to the American 
Legion and thus maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades. He 
also is a member of the Masonic Order. lie has been a consistent democrat 
through all the years since he attained his majority and has done what he could 
to further the interests id' the party, never faltering in his support of its prin- 
ciples oor in his allegiance to its candidates. In 1!):!:! he was appointed food 
inspector by Mayor O'Brien and his official record reflects credit and honor 
upon the party which he represents. 



ROBERT 11. BEVERLY, M. 1). 

Dr. Kobert II. Beverly, who is district health superintendent for the colored 
people id' the state and has his offices in Springfield, was born in Fairfax county, 
Virginia, January 27, 1*77, and is a son id' Ezekiel Beverly. He obtained a public 
school education in his native county and then attended the Hampton Normal 
and Agricultural Institute at Hampton, Virginia. Later he pursued a special 
preparatory course in medicine at Loyola Institute of Chicago and then studied 
medicine at Loyola, which was at that time known as the Dennett Medical College. 
He was graduated in 1912 with the M. I), degree. He spent part of the following 
year m Virginia and the remainder of the year in Cleveland, Ohio, in the attempt 
to get together enough money to enable him to begin practice. Locating in 
Jacksonville, Illinois, he there followed his profession for seven years, during 
which time he was a candidate for alderman on the republican ticket. He after- 
ward resided in Peoria for a year and since that time has been in Springfield, 
successfully following his profession among the people of his own race. Here 
he has taken quite an active part in politics as a supporter of democracy and is 
a member and director of the Roosevelt Horner Democratic Organization of 
Sangamon county. He was founder and president of the Downstate Democratic 
League, a colored organization, and president of the Colored Democratic Club of 
Sangamon county, of which he has been practically the head since its organiza- 
tion in 1928. In that year he led the colored democrats in the national campaign 
in Sangamon county. In 1 !):>() he was an unsuccessful candidate for the board of 
supervisors. He is now district health superintendent and also has charge of 
public health among the colored people for the entire state, working under Dr. 
Prank Jirka, director of public health for Illinois. On the twentieth anniversary 
of the National Negro Health Week in 1934, the state recognized the celebration 
and he was made the director of that function for Illinois. In the fall of 1933 he 
was a delegate to the judicial convention at Carrollton. 

In June, 1913, Dr. Beverly was married to Miss Lillian Williams, of Lynch- 
burg, Virginia, and they have six sons, namely: Robert, dr., and Ralph, twins; 
Raymond ; Milton ; Gerald ; and dames. Dr. Beverly has always been a student of 
the Bible and is well versed on Holy Writ. He is a member of Capital City Lodge 
of the Knights of Pythias, is also affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and along 
strictly professional lines has membership in the Sangamon County Medical 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 357 

Association and the Illinois State Medical Association. Through his own efforts 
he has accomplished much, gradually advancing in his profession until his ability 
lias brought him wide recognition as a physician of worth to the colored people 
of Illinois. 



•JAMES 0. KELLEY 



James O. Kelley. head farmer at the Illinois State Farm at Yandalia, is 
well qualified for the duties and responsibilities that devolve upon him in this 
connection, for his entire life has been devoted to agricultural and kindred pur- 
suits, so that he brought broad experience to his present position. Mr. Kelley was 
born in Alton, Illinois, -June 24, 1876, a son of James and Margaret (Lungton) 
Kelley. lie acquired his education by pursuing the work of the public schools 
up to and including the eighth grade. In his youth he engaged in farming and 
his entire attention was given to the work of the fields until 1906, when he removed 
to Alton and entered the grocery and poultry business. In this he engaged until 
1930, remaining one of the enterprising business men of the city through almost 
a quarter of a century. 

On the 12th of August, 1920, in Alton, Illinois, Mr. Kelley was united in 
marriage to Miss Sophie Meyer. They are communicants of the Catholic Church 
and politically Mr. Kelley has always been a democrat. While living in Alton he 
served as one of the alderman of the city from 1920 until 1924 and became street 
commissioner in 1928, filling the office for a two-year term. He was then made 
road commissioner in Jersey county, serving from 1916 until 1918. On the 1st 
of March, 1933, he was appointed head farmer at the Illinois State Farm at 
Vandalia and at once took up his duties, since which time he has rendered a good 
account of his activities to those above him. The farm presents a most attractive 
appearance, being carefully and systematically cultivated, while excellent crops 
are annually garnered. Mr. Kelley has attended several of the county conventions 
and he remains an earnesl and zealous supporter of democratic principles. 



JOSEPH JOHN MATHIEU 

On the list of those who constitute the county central committee of the 
democratic party in Du Page county appears the name of Joseph John Mathieu, 
of Villa Park, who is also occupying a position as a member of the highway main- 
tenance patrol. His loyalty in citizenship was further indicated by his response 
to the colors during the World war when he joined the United States Navy. 

Mr. Mathieu was born in Chicago, •June 27, 1892, a son of Joseph J. and 
Clara (Heller) Mathieu, the latter still a resident of Chicago. The father, who 
died in 1909, was a standi democrat who worked earnestly for his party in the 
old thirty-fifth ward of Chicago and was a member of the ward democratic cluh 
for a number of years. 

•Joseph J. Mathieu attended the parochial schools of his native city and on 
the 6th of April, 1917, volunteered for service in the United States Navy, be- 
coming a first-class seaman on the U. S. S. Montana. Throughout the duration 
of the war he was on active duty in the convoy service. 

Mr. Mathieu had become a resident of Villa Park in 1915 and has lived here 
ever since. In young manhood he learned the pattern maker's trade in Chicago 
and continued to follow that line of work until he became connected with the 
highway maintenance department, following his appointment to his present 
position as a patrolman in November, 1933. 

In 1916 Mr. Mathieu was united in marriage to Miss Agnes Smith and they 
are the parents of two children, Geraldine and Donald. The family are Catholics, 
and Mr. Mathieu is a member of the Holy Name Society. He belongs to Villa 
Park Post of the American Legion and he was the organizer of the Democratic 
Club of Villa Park. At the present time he is vice president of the York Town- 
ship Democi'atic Organization. In 1930 lie was appointed precinct committee- 
man, was elected to the position in 1932 and re-elected in ll»:!4. He is the com- 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

mitteeman of the fifth precincl of York township. There were only aboul fifty 
democratic votes in his precincl in L930, and in 1934 two hundred and thirty- 
seven democratic votes were east in the primary. He bad done active and effec- 
tive work in building up the party organization in his precincl and his fellow 
political workers acknowledge his worth. 

ralph Mclaughlin 

Ralph McLaughlin, who is filling the office of postmaster at Baylis, Pike 
county, was born in Fairmount township, this county, October 27, 1894, his 
parents being J. A. and Sarah E. (Chamberlain) McLaughlin. Throughout his 
entire life the lather has engaged in fanning in Fairinount township and the 
land upon which he resides has been in possession of the family since 1M6, 
showing that the McLaughlins are among the earliest of the pioneer settlers 
of the state, for this was two years before Illinois' admission to the Union. In 
politics he has always been a stanch democrat, thus following in the footsteps 
of his ancestors, who have given support to the party through many generations. 

Ralph McLaughlin attended the public schools of Fairmount township 
and for one year was a pupil in the high school in Pittsfield. He afterward 
took up teaching, which he followed for four years in Fairmount township, 
and since that time he has given his attention to farming. During his boyhood 
days he had worked in the fields with his father and early became familiar 
with progressive methods of tilling the soil and handling the crops. His work 
as a farmer has been a valuable contributing element to the agricultural prog- 
ress of the community. 

On January 21, 1915, Mr. McLaughlin was united in marriage to Miss Eva 
E. Martin and they are the parents of four children: Elsie Geraldine, Florence 
Ellen. Wayne Loraine and Ralph Merle. Mr. McLaughlin is well known in 
fraternal circles, belonging to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and also 
to the Masonic lodge. He has membership in the Methodist Church and his 
entire life has been actuated by high and honorable principles, making him a 
man whom to know is to esteem and respect. Mr. McLaughlin has been active 
in democratic affairs since old enough to take up party work and in April, 
1934, he was elected precinct committeeman. On the 11th of May, 1934, he 
was made acting postmaster of Baylis and on the 30th of May he received his 
commission confirming his appointment for a four-year term. 



JOHN P. RUSSELL 



John P. Russell, secretary of the Ford county central committee, has 
been actively engaged in business as manager of the Roberts Grain Company 
of Roberts since 1925. He was born in Roberts, Ford county, Illinois, Febru- 
ary 13, 1895, his parents being Joseph T. and Nora (Riordon) Russell, who 
still live on the home place. Patrick Russell, the paternal grandfather of 
our subject, became a resident of Chicago when a youth of eighteen years and 
obtained a position at the old Tremont Hotel, where Stephen A. Douglas was 
a frequent guest. Later he came to Roberts, Illinois, where he turned his 
attention to farming pursuits. Joseph R. Russell, the father of John P. 
Russell, was born in Roberts and has here been successfully engaged in farm- 
ing. Following in the political footsteps of his father, he is an active worker 
in the local ranks of the democratic party. 

The public schools of Roberts afforded John P. Russell his educational oppor- 
tunities. In young manhood he was chosen at a special election to fill an unexpired 
term as circuit clerk and recorder of Ford county, which office he filled most 
acceptably. When the United States entered the World war he was detailed to 
Camp Dodge, Iowa, where he was mess sergeant for eight months and was then 
commissioned second lieutenant, thus serving until honorably discharged. He has 
since been a member of the reserve force and now holds the rank of first lieu- 
tenant. An active member of the American Legion, he has served as commander 




ralph Mclaughlin 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 361 

of Roberts Post, No. 641, for two terras. Since 1925 lie has been connected with 
the Roberts Grain Company in a managerial capacity and has contributed in 
substantial measure to the steady growth and success of the business. 

Mr. Russell has been an influential factor in the local ranks of the democratic 
party since attaining his majority and has served as secretary of the Ford 
county central committee since 1932. He was a candidate for the house of 
representatives of the state legislature in 1924 and 1926, and he has attended 
practically all the state conventions of his party. He is now serving as a member 
of the Ford county debt conciliation committee by appointment of Governor 
Horner. 



JACOB JOHN WEBER 

The highway patrol service is a most important branch of state activity 
and it is in this field of public work that Jacob John Weber is active, having 
been made a member of the highway maintenance patrol February 25, 1933. 
He makes his home at Manhattan, Will county, and was born at Greengarden, 
Illinois, September 24, 1886, being a son of Pinnet and Catherine Weber, both 
of whom have passed away. The father was a democrat throughout his entire 
life and was very enthusiastic in support of the party. 

The common schools afforded Jacob J. Weber his educational opportunities 
and when his textbooks were put aside he became a farmer, following agricultural 
pursuits until about five years ago. In 1929 he retired and removed to Manhattan, 
where he has since lived. 

In 1906 Mi'. Weber was united in marriage to Miss Anna Leppin. They 
attend and hold membership in St. Paul's Evangelical Church and Mr. Weber is 
also a consistent member of the Masonic fraternity. In politics an active demo- 
crat, he has served as precinct committeeman and has been an earnest and 
effective worker in the campaigns. He therefore deserved his appointment as 
highway maintenance patrolman on the 25th of February, 1933, since which time 
his official record has won him high commendation. 



JOHN THOMAS BERGIN 

For a quarter of a century John Thomas Bergin has resided in Toulon, where 
he is conducting a successful business as a master plumber. He is also recognized 
as one of the most prominent of the leaders of the democratic party in this section 
of the state. A native of Ireland, he was born in Loughrea, March 19, 1882, a 
son of William and Katherine (Madden) Bergin, who were born, reared and mar- 
ried in Ireland. The father came to the new world in 1883, landing at Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, on the 4th of July, after which he immediately took out 
his first naturalization papers. On becoming an American citizen he voted the 
democratic ticket and was alwavs a faithful follower of the party to the time of 
his death in 1916. 

John T. Bergin attended St. Mary's school in Canandaigua, New York, 
where he pursued the regular common school course, while later lie took a high 
school course in Canandaigua Academy, from which he was graduated in 1900. 
He then began learning the plumber's trade, which he has followed for thirty- 
four years, and throughout the intervening period he has made steady progress 
along business lines. Twenty-five years ago he came to Toulon, where he has 
since resided, and throughout the entire time he has carried on a plumbing busi- 
ness which has steadily grown in volume and importance. 

On the 25th of June, 1911, in Galva, Illinois, Mr. Bergin was united in mar- 
riage to Effie Adams Henderson, who is also ;m active supporter of tin- democratic 
party, Mr. and Mrs. Bergin are the parents of two sons, John Madden and 
Samuel Adams, who are nineteen and seventeen years of age, respectively. The 
religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic Church and Mr. Bergin 
manifests his interest in community welfare as a member of the Toulon Civic 
Club. During the World war he belonged to the Home Guards. As a democratic 



362 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

voter be has worked consistently and untiringly for the support of the party. 
In 1!U7 stark county was overwhelmingly republican, and Mr. Bergin, witn firm 
faith in democratic principles, organized the lirst democratic committee and was 
its chairman. He lias labored unceasingly for the party organization ever since 
and in 1931 be was elected alderman of the first ward of Toulon, in which capa- 
city he has served to the present time. He attended the state convention in 1!K52 
and his labors in behalf of the party have been most effective. As a business man 
he enjoys an unassailable reputation and Toulon classes him with her representa- 
ti\ e and honored citizens. 



JOSEPH KENNETH BAKER 

Joseph Kenneth Laker, a member of the state police, making his home at 447 
Last Main street in West Chicago, was horn September 11, 1898, in the city where 
he still resides, his parents being Charles Y. and Jane Laker. The father was 
a stanch advocate of democratic principles. He died at the age of seventy-nine 
years and is still survived his widow, who has reached the age of seventy-two 
years and is now living with a daughter in Chicago. 

Joseph K. Baker completed a grammar school education and also the high 
school course in West Chicago, after which he learned and followed the black- 
smith's trade, being employed by the National Supply Company. He worked 
in that way until called to office. 

On the 25th of dune, 1925, Mr. Baker married Miss .Mae Parrel] and they 
are the parents of three children, John, Joseph and Maureen. Mr. Baker belongs 
to the Knights of Columbus and the family are communicants of St. Mary's 
Catholic Church. His fidelity to the interests of democracy is always above 
question and he is now serving for the second term as precinct committeeman. 
Some years ago there were only four democratic votes in the precinct but today 
it numbers one hundred and ninety, due largely to the effective organization 
work of Mr. Baker and others of his political faith. He was sergeant at arms for 
the Du Page county central committee and he was a delegate to the last state 
convention which was held in Springfield. 



WILLIAM J. SULLIVAN 

William J. Sullivan, a hardware merchant who is regarded as one of the 
leading business men of Hanover, was born in Warren county, Missouri, Sep- 
tember 8, 1871, a son of Jerry and Helen (Collins) Sullivan. In his youthful 
days he attended the public schools of St. Louis, Missouri, and of Washington 
township, Carroll county, Illinois, the family home being established in the 
latter locality. In young manhood he engaged in farming and also followed 
various other pursuits. He was then appointed postmaster of Hanover under 
President Wilson, occupying the position for six years, or from 1914 until 1920. 
In the latter year he established the hardware business which he has since con- 
ducted and in the intervening period of fourteen years he has built up a good 
trade as the result of his progressive and reliable business methods. 

In 1898 Mr. Sullivan w T as united in marriage to Miss Eda Seeger and they 
are the parents of seven children, namely: Cecile, w r ho is the wife of H. Earl 
Ballein, postmaster at Hanover; Emma, the wife of Ralph Sheridan, an attor- 
ney of Freeport, Illinois ; Helen, who is a school teacher of Hanover ; John W. ; 
Jerry; Bert; and Roger. The family are communicants of the Catholic Church 
and Mr. Sullivan is a member of the Knights of Columbus. For many years 
he has taken a helpful interest in the work of the democratic party, doing all 
in his power to promote its growth and win victories for its candidates. For 
the past twenty years he has served as precinct committeeman, so that he has 
voice in shaping the policy of the party and directing its destinies in Jo Daviess 
county. Since 1932 he has been a member of the executive committee of the 
Jo Daviess countv central committee. 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 363 

BERNARD GROVER FINNEGAN 

Bradford's democracy finds a worthy representative in Bernard G rover 
Finnegan, who is the present postmaster and who has supported the democratic 
party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He was born on a 
farm three and one-half miles northeast of Bradford in November, 1892, a son 
of John and Mary (Hearn) Finnegan. The father has been a lifelong democrat, 
always supporting the men and measures of the party. 

At the usual age Bernard G. Finnegan entered the public schools of Brad- 
ford, attending the Sharkey school and afterward the Bradford high school, where 
lie pursued his studies for three years. He spent the following year as a student 
in St. Mary's College at St. Marys, Kansas, and in 1914 he was graduated from 
the Michigan State Auto School at Detroit, thus preparing for activity in the 
business world. From 1926 until 1931 he was engaged in the automobile and radio 
sales business in Bradford and he has also engaged in the cultivation of a farm 
near the town. On the 1st of March, 1934, he was appointed acting postmaster 
and on the 18th of June was regularly appointed to the position. 

On the 14th of June, 1918, in Toulon, Mr. Finnegan enlisted for service in 
the World war and went to the Camp Rahe Army School in North Kansas City, 
Missouri, where he remained until August. From the 11th of that month until 
the 14th of September he was at Camp Holabird, near Baltimore, Maryland, 
and later was in camp at Newark, New Jersey. On the 29th of September, 1918, 
he embarked for Europe, landing at Brest, France, on the 7th of October and 
there remaining for a week. He was with Water Tank Train No. 302 of the Motor 
Transport Corps and was sent from Brest to Commercy. From the 16th of 
October to the 11th of November he was on constant duty in the Meuse-Argonne 
sector but was never wounded. He was made a corporal and from the signing 
of the armistice until the 16th of February, 1919, was at Commercy, France. 
He was then transferred to the graves registration service with which organi- 
zation he served until the 1st of June, 1919, and assisted in burying twenty-two 
thousand of his comrades in that period at the United States cemeteries of 
Romagne and Beaumont. On the 19th of June he embarked from St. Nazaire 
for the United States, arriving in New York ten days later, and was mustered 
out at Mitchell Field, Long Island, July 7, 1919. Mr. Finnegan is a member of 
American Legion Post, No. 445, of Bradford, of which he is at present sergeant at 
arms, and Peoria Voiture No. 529 of the Forty and Eight. He belongs to St. 
John's Catholic Church of Bradford and is a third degree member of the Knights 
of Columbus. lie is now concentrating his efforts and energies upon the dis- 
charge of his official duties as postmaster of Bradford and is rendering a valuable 
service to his fellow townsmen. He has been an active party worker in Bradford 
and vicinity and has taken an active interest in state political affairs, attending 
several state conventions as a visitor. 



CLAYTON LAY HOLDERNESS 

De Kalb numbers among her native sons Clayton Lay Holderness, who was 
here born September 12, 1893. His father, James C. Holderness, was a native 
of Canada and on crossing the border into the United States made his way to 
De Kalb county, Illinois. When the country called for troops to aid in the preser- 
vation of the Union he joined the army as a member of the Seventeenth Illinois 
Cavalry and served through the duration of the war. He married Katherine 
Bray, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Bray, who came to America from Ireland. 

The schools of De Kalb accorded Clayton L. Holderness his educate ial 
opportunities. He completed his studies by graduation with the class of 1912 
and is therefore numbered among the high school alumni. He afterward took 
up plumbing, learned the trade and became a journeyman, working at that 
business altogether for twenty-two years. On the 25th of April, 1933, he was 
appointed one of the state highway police and is still serving in that capacity. 

On the 4th of December, 1915, at Geneva, Illinois. Mr. Holderness was 



364 ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 

united in marriage to Harriet Hart, of l)<- Kail), and they are the parents of four 
children, as follows: Margaret, who is thirteen years of age; .Mary, eleven years 
old; John, aged nine years; and Paul, who is two years of age. 

.Air. Holderness is a member of De Kail) Post No. <>(> of the American Legion. 
He enlisted at Sycamore. -Inly 12, 1918, as a member of the Signal Corps No. 424 
and was on duty as sergeant of Company I). From Sycamore lie went to Chicago, 
where he was a student at the Lewis Institute for four weeks. He was then sent 
In Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, where he remained for eight weeks, and was 
afterward at Camp I'pton, Long Island, for two weeks. He embarked November 
10, 1918, hut returned to Camp Upton and thence went to Camp Meade, .Mary- 
land, receiving his discharge at Camp Grant, .January 18, 1919. In politics he 
has always been a democrat and is an active worker in the party, belonging to 
thi' Young Peoples Democratic Club of De Kalb. 



H. EARL BALLEIN 



II. Karl Ballein, postmaster at Hanover, was born in this town April 8, 
1899, his parents being Louis and Olive (Wolcott) Ballein, the former a native 
of Warsaw, Illinois, and the latter a native of Hanover, Illinois. At the usual 
age II. Karl Ballein entered the public schools and passed through consecutive 
grades to his graduation from high school with the class of 1918. As soon as 
he had completed his course he entered the employ of the Hanover Railway 
Company, as motorman, with which company he remained for fourteen years, 
working his way steadily upward as he gained experience and efficiency, until 
he was station agent. This railway is now extinct. 

On the .'30th of June, 1924, Mr. Ballein was united in marriage to Miss 
Cecile Sullivan, daughter of W. J. and Eda (Seeger) Sullivan, the father, a 
well known hardware merchant ami prominent democrat of Hanover, whose 
biography appears elsewhere in this work. Mr and Mrs. Ballein are the parents 
of a daughter, Patricia. 

Mr. Ballein has been an earnest worker in democratic circles since 1928 
and was very active in the campaign of 1932. His allegiance to the party re- 
ceived recognition when on the 1st of August 1934, he was appointed acting 
postmaster of Hanover and he is now serving in that position. His fellow towns- 
men are satisfied with the way in which he administers the office and his course 
receives public endorsement. He was active in organizing the Young Peoples 
Democratic Club of Hanover, of which Mrs. Ballein is also an active member. 



GEORGE W. ROHRER 

George W. Rohrer, assessor of Chatham township and manager of the 
Chatham Grain Elevator Corporation, was born in Ball township, Sangamon 
county, February 11, 1872. His parents, Andrew and Minnie (Schmidt) Rohrer. 
were natives of Germany, whence they came to the new w y orld at an early age, 
casting in their lot witli the farming community of Ball township. The father 
always devoted his life to agricultural pursuits. On becoming an American 
citizen he endorsed the principles of democracy and continued a stalwart sup- 
porter of the party. He held the position of road commissioner for twelve years 
and for sixteen years served on the school board, the cause of education ever 
finding in him a warm friend. 

The youthful days of George W. Rohrer were divided between the ac- 
quirement of a public school education in his native township and work upon 
his father's farm. He continued at home until he had attained his majority, 
when he began working by the month for others, spending a year in that way. 
He afterward took up farming on his own account and for thirty-five years 
was active in the tilling of the soil in P>all and Woodside tOAvnships, his intelli- 
gently directed efforts resulting in the harvesting of good crops. He then 
removed to Chatham, where he engaged in trading in live stock for two years. 




GEORGE W. ROIIRER 



ILLINOIS DEMOCRACY 367 

and next accepted the position of manager of the Chatham Grain Elevator 
Corporation, with which he has since been identified. 

On the 13th of September, 1900, Mr. Rohrer married Miss Georgia Bridges, 
a daughter of George and Rebecca Bridges, both natives of Woodside township 
and both supporters of the democratic party. Her father was at one time 
collector of Woodside township and was a deputy sheriff under Colonel Sam 
Shoup of Civil war fame Mr. and Mrs. Rohrer now make their home in 
Chatham, and our subject has always lived within five miles of his birthplace. 
They attend St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church and are well known so- 
cially, having many warm friends in this community. Mr. Rohrer largely 
devotes his leisure to reading, from which he gleans much enjoyment. He was 
one of the fifteen original members of the Sangamon County Farm Bureau 
and its affiliated organizations, and he is a member of the National Grain Cor- 
poration, the Illinois Grain Corporation and the Cooperative Buyers. Always 
a democrat, he served as collector in Ball township for two years and was one 
of the precinct committeemen of the township for twenty years. He acted 
as precinct committeeman in Woodside township for three years,. was assessor 
there for two years and in 1933 was elected assessor of Chatham township. He 
is an organization man, was a charter member of the Roger Sullivan organiza- 
tion and was one of the early members of the Roosevelt-Horner organization. 
He never wavers in his allegiance to the party and his activities have had more 
than local influence. 



A. MORRIS WILLIAMS 

Among the able, thinking men who have been converted to the demo- 
cratic party in recent years is A. Morris Williams, who has become widely 
known in Springfield and Illinois as a successful lawyer, business man, and a 
leader in fraternal affairs. 

Mr. Williams was born in Hampton, Virginia, on the 14th of December, 
1879. and is a son of Robert H. and Martha (Brown) Williams. He studied 
in the public schools of Hampton, also in Lincoln Academy of that city, and 
then went to Providence, Rhode Island, for a period, there working in a shoe 
factory. In this capacity he had the opportunity to learn the Italian language, 
which has been a distinct asset to him in subsequent years. In 1902 he opened 
a shoe shop in Springfield, and also engaged in the junk business. Ambitious 
to make a success of his life, he attended the Ambidexter School and the 
Harlem Law School, which latter is now the Lincoln Law School, and then, 
for one year, studied law at the University of Michigan. Mr. Williams was 
admitted to practice in Illinois in 1907, and was soon afterward admitted 
to practice in the federal courts. Immediately he opened a law office in 
Springfield, and for a short interval was associated in the practice with 
Octavius B. Royal, but is now engaged alone, with offices situated at 120 
South Eleventh street. He is also the executive head of The Williams Com- 
pany, a family organization which lends money and deals in real estate. 

Mr. Williams was originally a republican in his political faith but in 1930 
was converted to democracy and is now one of the most prominent workers 
in the party ranks. Especially among the colored people and the Italians, 
whose language he speaks fluently, he wields much influence. He is a member 
of the management of the Roosevelt-Horner Regular Democratic Club, and he 
lias organized locally and throughout the state many democratic clubs and 
has likewise covered the state on speaking tours in the Roosevelt-Horner 
campaign. Mr. Williams has been a candidate for legislator and for city 
commissioner, but was unsuccessful. 

Mr. Williams is the founder and the president of The Knights and 
Daughters of Honor, which is now a national organization and in character 
is a fraternal beneficiary society. He is a member of the blue lodge of Masons 



368 ILLINOIS DEMO